Handmade Ceramic Blooms and Succulents by Owen Mann 

Self-taught artist Owen Mann creates ceramic blooms from dozens, and sometimes hundreds of petals, each hand-formed to mimic the appearance of peonies, dahlias, and spiraling succulents. Simply painted in cool shades of blues and greens, the porcelain flowers look as if they were freshly plucked from the garden. You can see more of Mann’s faux flora on his Instagram, and purchase the pieces on his Etsy shop. (via So Super Awesome)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Wire Mesh Figures of Children Appear to Dissolve into Thin Air 

Norwegian artist Lene Kilde seeks inspiration in the emotions of children, deftly capturing brief moments in their lives distilled into minimalistic wire mesh sculptures. The pieces focus almost entirely on the hands and feet of her subjects that dissolve into nothingness as they go about various activities. This is not to suggest anything is inherently missing, but rather to invite the viewer to complete the rest of each sculpture in their mind, perhaps substituting the missing fragments with their own memories or stories.

Kilde completed a masters degree in product design in 2012 and was subsequently awarded a three-year work scholarship from the Norwegian Arts Council. She is currently represented by Galleri Ramfjord where you can find more of her figurative sculptures.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Street Kintsugi: Artist Rachel Sussman Repairs the Roads with Gold 

“Study for Sidewalk Kintsukuroi #01 (New Haven, Connecticut),” photograph with enamel paint and metallic dust.

As part of an ongoing series titled Sidewalk Kintsukuroi, artist Rachel Sussman (previously) brings the Japanese art of kintsugi to the streets. We’ve long been enamored by the ancient technique that traditionally involves the process of fixing broken pottery with a lacquer dusted or mixed with powdered gold, resulting in an a repair that pays homage to the object’s history. In the same way, Sussman’s kintsugi series highlights the history under our feet, bringing attention to the imperceptible changes that take place over time in the world around us. Though even the repairs are impermanent and will eventually be lost to wear and tear.

Several photos from Sidewalk Kintsukuroi are currently on view as part of the Alchemy: Transformations in Gold at the Des Moines Art Center through through May 5, 2017. (via Hyperallergic)

“Study for Sidewalk Kintsukuroi #09 (SoHo, New York),” photograph with enamel paint and metallic dust.

“Study for Sidewalk Kintsukuroi #02 (MASS MoCA),” photograph with enamel paint and metallic dust

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

The Rise of the Image: Every NY Times Front Page Since 1852 in Under a Minute 

The New York Times published its first issue on September 18, 1851, but the first photos wouldn’t appear on the cover until the early 1900s over 60 years later. This visual timeline by self-described data artist Josh Begley captures the storied newspaper’s approach to layout and photography by incorporating every NY Times front page ever published into a single one-minute video. The timelapse captures decades text-only front pages before the newspaper began to incorporate illustrated maps and wood engravings. The liberal usage of black and white photography begins a century later and finally the first color photo appears in 1997. What a fascinating way to view history through image, over 60,000 front pages in all. If you liked this, don’t miss Farewell — ETAOIN SHRDLU. (via Kottke)

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

A Homemade Multipoint Pinhole Camera Made from 32,000 Drinking Straws 

Using 32,000 black drinking straws, collaborators Michael (Mick) Farrell and Cliff Haynes created the Straw Camera, a homemade camera they began experimenting with in 2007. Despite the connection one might draw to a pinhole camera, the Straw Camera actually functions quite differently, producing a multipoint perspective from an array rather than a single point perspective.

The direct analogue process records the light collected from each straw onto a piece of paper secured to the back of the camera. The camera gives a direct 1:1 view of the subject that is placed before it, however it translates the image to one that mirrors that of pointillist painting, breaking the subject into thousands of little dots.

“In a world beset by selfies with their immediate gratification, and HD television in all its glory feeding our visual appetite, a Straw Camera image of an individual, with its engineering projection and disappearance of the subject into the near fog of visual capture, gives the viewer a glimpse of just how transitory perception is,” said Cliff about the camera.

To read more about the project, check out the photography duo’s website for the Straw Camera, or their book which was published earlier this month. (via PetaPixel)

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Unique Stool Design Utilizes Offcut Wood Combined With Resin to Eliminate Construction Waste 

Seeking a way to reduce waste as part of their industrial design practice, South Korean design studio HATTERN conceived of a hybrid resin and wood seating concept called Zero Per Stool. As part of the construction process the waste offcut from creating the legs are saved and then combined with resin to form the stool’s seat. The resulting objects have almost zero waste and appear visually unique from piece to piece—each stool subtly paying tribute to its own construction process. HATTERN also adopted the same process for a series of resin coasters that make use of scrap wood materials. You can follow more of their recent work on Facebook. (via Design Milk)

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Page 1 of 8031234...»