New Trash and Found Object Murals by ‘Bordalo II’ on the Streets of Lisbon

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Artist Bordalo II (previously here and here) uses old tires, bumpers, and other scraps of painted found trash to form towering 3D murals of animals on the streets of Lisbon, Portugal. Collected here are several pieces from the last few months, and you can see much more on Facebook. (via Beautiful/Decay)

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You Are Here Umbrella

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Multi-disciplinary artist Nadiah Alsagoff designed this fun shadow umbrella that never fails to remind you exactly where you are. These shots are stills of a larger video art piece exploring Alsagoff’s interest in “relationship between the body, the self and its position the everyday world.” (via Fubiz, This Isn’t Happiness)

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Edible and Stackable DIY LEGO Gummy Candy

Grant Thompson of the King of Random just shared a great tutorial on how to make completely edible gummy LEGO bricks and figures using a mixture of corn syrup, Jello, and gelatin. Using the right molds, the pieces are so precise you can actually build with them. Unlike the chocolate LEGO bricks we featured a few months ago, these look somewhat simple to make. (via The Awesomer)

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Avocado Love Wool Sculpture by Hanna Dovahan

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Ukranian crafter Hanna Dovahan makes some pretty fantastic wool objects including animals, arthropods, and food which she sells in her Etsy shop. This avocado love piece is on a slightly higher plane of amazing.

Anish Kapoor’s Perpetual Black Water Whirlpool Installed in the Floor of a Former Movie Theater in Italy

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Churning and frothing just below the old wooden floor of a former movie theater in San Gimignano, Italy, a mysterious vortex of ominous black water seems to perpetually drain into nothingness. The artwork is a new iteration of artist Anish Kapoor's Decension installation that appeared earlier this year in India. The former cinema and theatre space is now the home of Galleria Continua that hosted the exhibition. Kapoor shared about the piece:

All my life I have reflected and worked on the concept that there is more space than can be seen, that there are void spaces, or, as it were, that there is a vaster horizon. The odd thing about removing content, in making space, is that we, as human beings, find it very hard to deal with the absence of content. It’s the horror vacui. This Platonic concept lies at the origin of the myth of the cave, the one from which humans look towards the outside world. But here there is also a kind of Freudian opposite image, that of the back of the cave, which is the dark and empty back of being. Your greatest poet, Dante, also ventured into a place like that. It is the place of the void, which paradoxically is full – of fear, of darkness. Whether you represent it with a mirror or with a dark form, it is always the “back”, the point that attracts my interest and triggers my creativity.

Descension was on view through May 9th of this year. (via My Amp Goes to 11)

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Wet Fold Origami Technique Gives Wavy Personality to Paper Animals by Artist Hoang Tien Quyet

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Often one associates origami with sharp and precise folds, miniature works that have a crisp perfection. Origami artist Hoang Tien Quyet shies away from this rigidity, instead folding his small objects with a technique called “wet-folding,” which allows curves to be created instead of the typical straight lines. With this technique Vietnam-based Quyet creates posed animals bounding with personality, their heads tilted and wings ready for flight.

The technique of wet folding was created by the late origami master Akira Yoshizawa, and involves dampening the paper so it easily accepts folds. Wet-folding gives the paper works a more realistic appearance, adds a rounded quality to the origami, and allows it to appear malleable even though the pieces dry into hardened forms. Wet-folding also involves using a thicker paper, as traditional origami paper would easily tear if wet.

Quyet is co-author of two books, “50 hours Origami +” and “VOG2 – origami.vn,” both published by Passion Origami. Quyet’s skill and has lead to him being invited to several international origami conventions, including Germany, France, Italy, and Japan. You can see more images of Quyet’s animals on his Flickr. (via My Modern Met)

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Perfect Home: An Immersive Tour of Do Ho Suh’s Massive Silk Architecture Installations

Korean artist Do Ho Suh (previously here and here) is interested in how we interact with public space. Directed, shot, and edited by Nils Clauss, “Perfect Home” brings together several exhibitions from 2002-2012 to examine the breadth of Do Ho Suh’s immersive works. Due to the thin nature of the fabric Do Ho Suh often uses to construct his installations, the pieces are extremely difficult to capture without standing directly next to, or within. Perfect Home manages to look at the artist’s work as one might if physically in the space, producing angles that imitate a natural way of absorbing the work.

Clauss allows the audience to at first be alone with Do Ho Suh’s work, examining both minuscule details and the works from afar. At the very end of the film scenes that include others interacting with the work are introduced. These shots give the viewer a sense of how others interact with the space, and force us to share these now public works.

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Do Ho Suh was born in 1962 in Seoul, and studied painting at the Rhode Island School of Design and sculpture at Yale University. Do Ho Suh’s work examines the malleability of space, both physically and how it is perceived metaphorically. The artist’s large scale and site-specific instillations often compare the individual to the collective. Do Ho Suh’s work is included in a number of museum collections internationally, and in 2013 was named WSJ Magazine’s Innovator of the Year in Art. Do Ho Suh now splits his work and residence between New York, London, and Seoul.

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