Wire Animal Sculptures that Look Like Scribbled Pencil Drawings by David Oliveira


Artist David Oliveira (previously) works with wire in an unconventional way by cutting and twisting the material into sculptures that could be mistaken for 2D sketches. Despite the apparent difficulty of shaping wire into a recognizable form, Oliveira manages to achieve uncanny proportions of his animal subjects in this series of sculptures from 2014. Viewed from one angle the pieces could be mistaken for a chaotic jumble, but a shift in perspective reveals the squinting eyes of lions, or the spread wings of a pelican. The Lisbon-based artist also creates vast interior installations of birds and thoughtful examinations of the human form. You can scroll through an archive of his work over on Facebook. (via Cross Connect)







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Glistening Snail Shells Painted on a Crumbling Croatian Facade by ‘Lonac’




Croatian artist Lonac recently finished work on this trio of snails painted on a dilapidated building in his hometown of Zagreb. Titled “Xenophora,” the mural depicts three photorealistic carrier snails pinned to the edges of the old building creating a compelling contrast between old and new. The piece was created for the Rendezvous Festival and you can see more views and process shots on his website. (via StreetArtNews)

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Fluxos: A Mesmerizing Experimental Claymation Short by Diego Akel

When watching this short animation by Brazilian animator Diego Akel, you get the distinct feeling he covered a table with clay, turned on some music, and just started messing around while snapping a photo every minute or so, almost like a kid in a sandbox. You wouldn’t think abstract experimentation with clay would result in anything particularly compelling, but in this instance it happens to be amazing. Titled Fluxos, Akel says the piece is “an essay about the constant flows of life, a self-portrait of its own process, an improvise [sic] on Bach, an investigation on plasticine.”



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Awesome Aquariums: Winners of the 2015 International Aquatic Plants Layout Contest

#1 (Grand Prize) Takayuki Fukada, Japan / Courtesy IAPLC & Aquabase

While most people are satisfied with giving their pet goldfish some colorful gravel, a plastic plant, and maybe one of those bubbly treasure chests, the entrants to the International Aquatic Plants Layout Contest (IAPLC) have turned aquarium design into an artform. The massive tanks require years of preparation and are focused almost entirely on the aesthetic presentation of plants using only natural elements.

The art of aquascaping is still a fledgling endeavor, first started in the 90s by Japanese wildlife photographer Takashi Amano. The annual IAPLC competition has grown dramatically since, with the 2015 contest seeing 2,545 entries from 69 countries. Japan, China, Brazil, and France dominate the top finalist spots (only 13 entries were from the United States). Finalists were announced in September.

The scoring of each aquarium is based on a complex matrix of six criteria: the recreation of natural habitat for fish; the creator’s technical skills; the long-term maintenance of the habitat; the originality and impression of the layout; presentation of natural layout; and the overall composition and planting ‘balance’. Participants face severe penalties for reconfiguring elements from their own past entries, stealing ideas from others, and using plants that may not last long-term in the environment presented.

This year’s grand prize winner was Takayuki Fukada from Japan with his aquarium titled Longing. You can see our previous coverage of the IAPLC here. All images courtesy IAPLC and AquaA3. (via Vice)

#2 范博文, China / Courtesy IAPLC & AquaA3

#4 Paulo Pacheco, Brazil / Courtesy IAPLC & Aquabase

#5 叶毅, China / Courtesy IAPLC & Aquabase

#7 刘勇, China / Courtesy IAPLC & Aquabase

#8 タナカカツキ, Japan / Courtesy IAPLC & Aquabase

#10 Luis Carlos Galarraga, Brazil / Courtesy IAPLC & Aquabase

#12 Ana Paula Cinato, Brazil / Courtesy IAPLC & Aquabase

#16 张大东, China / Courtesy IAPLC & Aquabase

#19 薛海, Taiwan / Courtesy IAPLC & Aquabase

#21 Andre Longarco, Brazil / Courtesy IAPLC & Aquabase

#22 Olivier Thebaud, France / Courtesy IAPLC & Aquabase

#23 Michaël Leroy, France / Courtesy IAPLC & Aquabase

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Sprawling Tattoo-Inspired Ink Drawings by ‘Benze’

Stop Whispering

Stop Whispering

Stop Whispering

Stop Whispering

Hungarian artist Benze produces intensely detailed ink drawings by fusing aspects of tattoo art and objects from the natural world, components the artist views as an important way to continuously open his work to new meanings and interpretations. The excruciating detail achieved through stippling and cross hatching with fine pens is stunning whether viewed in its entirety or zoomed in on various sections—simultaneously existing on a macro and micro level.

“Each work has its own gravitational field which irresistibly forces us to zoom in, explore more, discover new aspects within the whole,” says Benze.

The content of his drawings typically involves female faces with ornate head pieces adorning the women’s hair. Natural elements make up these decorative pieces, including objects like flowers, grasses, twigs and posed animal skeletons.

You can see more work from the artist on his Behance page here. (via Scene360)

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Stop Whispering

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Stop Whispering







Famous Oil Paintings Add a Modern Twist to Limited Edition Boards


Famous oil paintings cover the surface of limited edition boards in both triptych and diptych variations in Boom-art and UWL's newest collaboration. The French skate and surf gallery teamed up with surf company UWL to produce the ‘504’ series that includes the work of Jan Davidsz. de heem (1606-1684), Hieronymus Bosch (1450-1516), Jan van Huysum (1682-1749), and more.

The centuries old twist adds a modern pop of rich colors and patterns to the surf and skateboards, each board handmade and individually numbered by UWL. For the series, each skateboard has been produced in an edition of 80, and the surfboards come in an edition of just 10. (via Designboom and This Isn’t Happiness)






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New DIY Geometric Halloween Masks by Wintercroft


Marianne and Steve over at Wintercroft (previously) spent the last year dreaming up several new geometric paper masks that you can download as DIY templates. Last year they just had a handful of great designs, but now they have over 50, some of which have multiple components and even moving parts like an articulated elephant’s trunk, or the long body of a fish. All you have to do is download, print, and assemble, and paint or color as you see fit. See more on their Etsy site.










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