Light Cycles: Bicycle Wheels Rigged with LEDs Create Tron-Like Light Trails 


Filmmaker Mike Gamble and VFX creator Tom Wood had the wild idea of rigging up a few mountain bikes with LEDs and trying to create light trails similar to the lightbikes in Tron. The resulting video is pretty fantastic, both the straight footage of the circular light wheels rolling through the woods and the post-production special effects that stack the frames to make spirograph-like light designs. Watch the video below. (via Colossal Submissions)




See related posts on Colossal about , , .

A Spectacular Close-Up View of a Fiery-Throated Hummingbird 



Photographer Jess Findlay recently captured this amazing shot of a firey-throated hummingbord while shooting in the Talamanca Mountains in Costa Rica. The image is a result of hundreds of photos taken over several hours with a telephoto lens as he waited patiently for one of the small birds to perch at just the right angle. Findlay shares with Colossal:

Several of these hummingbirds were visiting a nectar feeder. As they fed hungrily, often quarrelling with one another, occasionally one would get displaced onto a nearby branch. I waited by the branch for a couple hours, staying very still. I used a telephoto lens with a special attachment that allowed me to focus on close subjects. What made this a challenge was how fidgety these birds can be and the fact that the full spectrum of colour is only seen when they pause at a very specific angle.

Findlay is a native of Vancouver where he’s extremely active in the photography community, offering a wide variety of workshops. You can see more of his work on Instagram.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Digital Artist Mike Winkelmann Creates Daily Conceptual Illustrations Spanning Nearly a Decade 


For over 9 years, graphic designer and digital artist Mike Winkelmann (aka Beeple) has endeavored to create a new digital illustration every single day. From abstract blobs of metallic goo to fully-realized science fiction landscapes, Winkelmann shares every creation he makes in an uninterrupated stream online via Tumblr, Facebook and elsewhere. While some pieces are more successful than others, he says the daily act of creation is less about producing consistently solid work, and more about working through ideas, quickly working through the bad ones, and learning new tools or methods. The vast majority of what he imagines simply defies explanation or genre, and themes change dramatically from image to image. Winkelmann shares more about his process and tools in this interview with iO9. (via Behance)









See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

A Mass of Tangled Red Yarn Unravels from a Loom to Overtake a Brazilian Chapel 


Tatiana Blass, “Penelope” (2011), carpet loom, wool yarn, chenille at the Chapel of Morumbi. Photos by Everton Ballardin

In 2011, Brazilian artist Tatiana Blass pierced the walls of a Sao Paulo chapel with large masses of red yarn, letting the bright material trail into the surrounding grasses, landscape, and trees. The installation, titled Penelope, was named after Odysseus’s wife in Homer’s Odyssey, a character who kept herself away from suitors while he was at war by weaving a burial shroud by day, and secretly taking pieces of it apart at night.

Inside the chapel the work continued with a 45-foot-long carpet leading to a loom into which it was stuck. Immaculate on one side of the loom and in pieces on the other, strings of the dismantled rug traveled outside of the chapel through preexisting holes that made their way into the yard. The piece, just like the epic poem, leaves us to wonder whether the work is in a state of construction or unraveling, if the carpet is being built, or slowly torn apart. (via Design Milk)







Penelope, before and after 6 months

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Explore the Role of Dynamic Media in Communication Design at MassArt (Sponsor) 


Image: Andrew Ringler: Music Sequencing, 2016

The MFA: Design (Dynamic Media Institute) at MassArt explores the role and possibilities of dynamic media in communication design. Each student’s vision for design develops into an original body of ideas and fresh practice.

Students come to DMI from diverse backgrounds: architects, industrial designers, programmers, engineers, filmmakers, musicians, anthropologists, photographers, fine artists, and graphic designers. They come from all over the world, including Central and South America, Asia, Europe and the United States. The student body reflects the program’s cross-disciplinary approach to dynamic media design.

Admission to DMI is highly selective. The 60-credit MFA: Design program is offered in three tracks: a two-year track in four semesters; a three-year track in five semesters; or a three-year track in six semesters, the difference being the distribution of elective credits. DMI also offers a one-year fellowship “non-matriculating track” to which candidates are accepted based on specific project proposals.

For more details and application info, visit

Airportraits: Composite Flight Path Photos Capture Planes Landing and Departing from Worldwide Airports 


For his ambitious Airportraits series, photographer Mike Kelley sets up camp outside of airports and meticulously photographs planes as they takeoff and land—shooting thousands of photos per location. He then uses Photoshop to isolate the planes and combines the images into the composite “portraits” you see here. Each image tells a fascinating story about the nature of each airport and the many unseen variables that affect the flight paths of each airport like noise regulations, plane size, and air traffic patterns.

When he initially began the project two years ago, Kelley’s plan was relatively straightforward: fly to 10 or so cities around the globe and spend a day or two at each airport scouting the location, taking photos, and then off to the next destination. This plan worked well in Europe where the weather was consistent, but soon he faced the reality that seasonal weather in places like Japan was completely unpredictable. In Tokyo he left without a single usable photo after days of trying. Some cities he had to return to 2-3 times in hopes the weather would improve, and in other places it would take nearly a week to photograph enough planes to make an image.

During editing, most planes are left “as is” in the location they appeared in the sky while taking off. Planes in the processes of landing proved to be more difficult. “For the landing images, I did take slight artistic liberty with the position of the aircraft, because in real life the planes follow a very specific glidepath to the touchdown point,” Kelley shares with Colossal. “If I hadn’t moved them, all the planes would be directly on top of one another and there’d be no real dynamics or movement in the image.”

In all, Kelley created 19 composite images you can explore on his website, all of which are available as limited edition fine art prints. You can see more of his photography on Instagram. (via Boing Boing, Kottke)










See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Page 1 of 7721234...»