Children’s Drawings Turned into Finely Crafted Jewelry 

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Tasarım Takarım (I Wear Design) is a Turkish jewelry company that converts children’s illustrations into finely crafted silver and gold jewelry. The project was first started two years ago by artists Yasemin Erdin Tavukçu and Özgür Karavit, who saw the opportunity to turn a simple doodle into timeless decorative object, not unlike bronzing a child’s baby shoes or capturing their handprints in clay. Each piece is one-of-a-kind and often requires special tools or means of production to faithfully replicate the intricacies of a child’s scribbles. You can follow their work on Instagram and Etsy. (via HuffPo)

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Collapsible Furniture That Transforms From Two to Three Dimensions Designed by Jongha Choi 

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Inspired by our perception of flattened images, Korean designer Jongha Choi decided to build a set of furniture that collapses into two-dimensions, conveniently hanging on the wall when not in use. These tables and chairs were produced for his thesis at Eindhoven Design Academy in The Netherlands, and are collectively titled De-Dimension.

“In our current situation, in which modern society experiences the image, in relation to advertising, image circulation and the internet, why do we not question an image’s confinement to a flat surface,” said Choi in his thesis. “Why don’t we try to get more stereoscopic and attempt for direct experience with the image. My question started with this point, and I tried several experiments in order to realize this idea from a personal point of view.”

You can see the collapsible models in action below and read more about Choi’s project on his website. (via Twister Sifter)

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Mandalas Formed From Foraged Wood and River Stones Designed by Matt W. Moore 

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All images via MWM Graphics

Graphic designer Matt W. Moore has always been attracted to the infinite possibilities of mandalas, spending a great deal of time producing graphically-oriented grids on both canvases on walls. When Moore had the chance to take an artist residency in Eden, Utah he decided that he would like to reconsider the motif, gathering elements found scattered on the mountains and nearby valley. The result of his foraging is a series of neatly organized designs, concentric elements composed of bark, cattails, shale, and river stones.

“At first it felt like playing caveman Tetris, somewhat of a flashback to building block castles I made as a child, but as the configurations evolved to be more complex I very much felt like a graphic artist or bricklayer, every measurement had to be dialed and every pebble or twig needed to be carefully placed,” said Moore in a description of the project. “By the end of the series it no longer felt like assemblage art, instead it was more of a painterly process, with the palette to my left and my paintbrush replaced with elemental expressions and flourishes, kind of like painting with mother nature’s paintbrush.”

You can see Moore’s painted mandalas on his website and see a selection of both his natural and graphic work on his Instagram. (via Synaptic Stimuli)

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New Laser-Cut Wood Relief Sculptures by Gabriel Schama 

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Oakland-based artist Gabriel Schama (previously) continues to produce intricate relief sculptures by layering pieces of laser-cut mahogany plywood. Some of his most impressive new works see mandala-like shapes contained within the silhouettes of people’s faces, a striking idea that imbues each portrait with an unusual sense of motion and personality. Other pieces seem to utilize religious iconography or patterns from nature like reptile scales or leaves. Schama is soon to release a new collection of work for sale and you can learn more via his website.

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Pirate Printers: Shirts and Totes Printed Directly on Urban Utility Covers 

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Using public street fixtures as printing elements, the artist collective behind Berlin-based Raubdruckerin (pirate printer) produces shirts and bags imprinted with manhole covers, vents, and utility grates. The overlooked geometric patterns and typographic forms of urban signage make surprisingly nifty graphics for shirts. The collective applies ink directly to the streets and prints on-site in locations like Amsterdam, Lisbon, and Paris and then sell their creations through an online shop. It would be amazing to see something like this come out of Japan. (via Quipsologies)

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Artist Loris Cecchini Turns Gallery Walls into Vibrating Pools of Liquid 

In his ongoing series of relief sculptures titled “Wallwave Vibrations,” artist Loris Cecchini appears to liquify the walls of art galleries by turning them into pools of undulating waves caused by sound. Each piece is first digitally produced and then fabricated with polyester resin before being seamlessly applied to a flat surface. He remarks about the pieces:

In my most recent sculptures, the ‘Wallwave Vibrations’ series, one loses the element of the object proper. The concern for alteration is concerned more particularly with the physical manifestation of the vibrations, expressed each time with different frequencies and intensities, wherein the visual pattern becomes “echo” of a phenomenon like a succession of waves on a liquid surface. In this direction it is as if the architecture, or a portion of it, is modified by the relationship between the sculpture and the wall.

You can see much more of Cecchini’s organic and environment-influenced sculptures and installations on his website. (via Synaptic Stimuli, Juxtapoz)

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