Art

Banksy Hits Paris with Sharp Political Criticism and Several Mischievous Rats

June 24, 2018

Sasha Bogojev

All photos courtesy @WhereTheresWalls, used with permission.

Against the backdrop of Paris Fashion Week which introduced several collaborative projects between high fashion brands and big names from the art world (Dior partnered with KAWS and Takashi Murakami continued collaborating with Virgil Abloh, the new artistic director of Louis Vuitton’s menswear collection), the French capital was for the first time hit by the world’s most elusive street artist—Banksy.

Without previous announcement or warning—and to this moment without official confirmation—Parisans began to discover several new street pieces that materialized in the urban/street art galaxy of the social media universe.

The first piece was found near the Porte de la Chapelle metro station, where Paris’ official refugee centre “La Bulle,” was located until August 2017. A city within a city, it was home to a makeshift camp of some 2,700 refugees, and was dismantled an estimated 35 times before 2,000 migrants were bussed to temporary shelters. This was done as part of Emmanuel Macron’s wish to remove the refugees “off the streets, out of the woods,” as stated during his campaign.

With this in mind, Banksy revisited his “Go Flock Yourself” piece from 2008, and created a new version as commentary on the current political situation in France and throughout Europe. Depicting a black girl painting a Victorian wallpaper pattern over a swastika, the artist is commenting on the way politicians are concealing wrongdoing and potentially fascist policies.

The second and third pieces appeared soon thereafter. One depicts a suited man luring a three-legged dog with a bone while hiding a saw behind his back, a metaphor for politicians tricking people with promises that often have a masked, devastating agenda. The other is Banksy’s take on the iconic painting “Napoleon Crossing the Alps” by Jacques-Louis David, a symbol of French power and influence. By covering the rider with his own cape, the artist is commenting on the current misguided way the government is leading the country, blinding people with propaganda and false promises.

The last three pieces introduce Bansky’s signature rats to their genesis—Parisian artist Blek Le Rat and his rat stencils were a great influence on the Bristol-born artist. Placing them around the city in ways that interact with local graffiti and building facades, it may appear as though they’re having fun blowing things up. But in reality, they are a reminder of a volatile period of civil unrest that took place in May 1968 when the government temporarily ceased to function.

In one piece a rat is propelled by a popping champagne bottle cork. Using this symbol of affluence as their vehicle to overtake obstacles, the rodents are once again Banksy’s metaphor for working class people making significant change when they join together and fight for similar cause.

All photos courtesy WhereTheresWalls.

 

 



Photography

Lovely Photo Manipulations Utilizing Stock Photography by Justin Peters

June 23, 2018

Christopher Jobson

Graphic designer Justin Peters has an uncanny ability to compose fantastical landscapes and creatures by combining stock imagery using Photoshop. The 22-year-old German digital artist says that he’s often driven by the famous Picasso quote “Everything you can imagine is real,” choosing to use photography found on stock imagery sites as the source material for his digital collages. You can see more of his recent work on Instagram.

 

 



Amazing Design Science

MIT Engineers Design Responsive 3D-Printed Structures Remotely Controlled by Magnets

June 22, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

A new concept for 3D printed structures designed by engineers at MIT can be remotely controlled with magnets. The innovative gadgets include a smooth ring that wrinkles up, a long tube that squeezes shut, and a sheet that folds itself. The most impressive structure is a spider-like “grabber” that can crawl, roll, jump, and snap together fast enough to catch a passing ball or wrap up and carry small objects. Each piece is created using 3D printable ink infused with tiny magnetic particles that are directed into a uniform orientation via printer nozzle retrofitted with a electromagnet.

Researches believe these magnetic concepts could one day find applications in the realm of medicine similar to implanted stents or pacemakers. “We think in biomedicine this technique will find promising applications,” explains Xuanhe Zhao, the Noyce Career Development Professor in MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. “For example, we could put a structure around a blood vessel to control the pumping of blood, or use a magnet to guide a device through the GI tract to take images, extract tissue samples, clear a blockage, or deliver certain drugs to a specific location. You can design, simulate, and then just print to achieve various functions.” (via digg)

 

 



Art

The Mind Reimagined in Paper Brains by Elsa Mora

June 21, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Paper artist Elsa Mora (previously) contemplates the brain in a new series titled Mindscapes. The collection of eight paper works show birds-eye views of the brain, rendered in different techniques. Carefully layered grey dots, intricate nets of delicate floral designs, embossed squiggles, and colorful stripes that leap off the page all offer a different interpretation of the heady world that is our mind. Mora’s Mindscapes will be shown in her solo exhibition at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art in Eugene, Oregon this fall. The show runs from August 29, 2018 to January 20, 2019. You can see more of the artist’s diverse array of paper art on Instagram.

 

 



Photography

Toy Stories: Portraits of Children and their Toys Around the World

June 21, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Cun Zi Yi, age 3 – Chongquing, China. All photographs provided by and © Gabriele Galimberti

Gabriele Galimberti spent more than two years traveling the world, visiting over fifty countries to photograph young children with their toys. The Italian photographer shares in a statement on Toy Stories, “I recorded the spontaneous and natural joy that unites kids despite their diverse backgrounds. Whether the child owns a veritable fleet of miniature cars or a single stuffed monkey, the pride that they have is moving, funny, and thought provoking.”

In addition to documenting the socioeconomic range of families around the world, Galimberti’s colorful portraits capture the unique personalities of each young person before his camera lens. The photographer has published a book, also called Toy Stories, which compiles all of the portraits from this series. His other titles include My Couch is your Couch, about how people live around the world, and In Her Kitchen, which documents grandmothers and their culinary traditions. You can see more of Galimberti’s work and travels on Instagram. (via Booooooom)

Maudy Sibanda, 3 – Kalulushi, Zambia

Gabriel Pascoal, age 3 – Sao Paulo – Brasil

Norden Brahke – age 5 age – Morocco

Alessia Pellegrini, age 5 – Castiglion Fiorentino, Italy

Virginia May Salisbury, age 5 – American Fork, Utah

Radhika Vachani, age 6 – Mumbai, India

Noel Hawthorne, age 5 – South Dallas, Texas

Abel Sientes Armas, age 4 – Nopaltepec, Mexico

Naya Gutierrez, age 3 – Managua, Nicaragua

Arafa and Aisha Saleh Aman, age 4 – Bububu, Zanzibar

Ralf Mazulis – age 4 – Riga, Lettonia

 

 



Art Photography

The Graceful Movement of Dancing Tulips Showcased by Carl Kleiner

June 20, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Carl Kleiner creates sleek editorial content for fashion and lifestyle brands, and that sensibility shows in his photo and video series Postures which features artfully arranged tulips. Using minimal metal rods, bent at strategic ends and angles, Kleiner showcases the graceful curves of the flowers’ long necks and gently ruffled petals and leaves. A further sense of movement is instilled through the stop-motion video, which combines still photos of the blossoms’ subtle changes into a dramatic dance. You can see more from the Swedish photographer on Instagram and Vimeo. (via Yellowtrace)

Film credits: Editing by @josephcolley Sound by @ekstrajournal. With assistance from @andrea_portoles

 

 

 



Art

New Prismatic Murals by Xomatok Cover the Streets of Lima With Bursts of Color

June 20, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Purificación (2018)

Visual artist and art director Xomatok (previously) has been busy in Lima, Peru, where he’s outfitted several walls, building facades, and random rock piles with his signature full-spectrum color gradients. The vivid interventions are in the district of Lima called Villa el Salvador, Xomatok shares with Colossal. And although the artist is often commissioned to add his color pops to outdoor areas, the pieces seen here are part of his personal work. You can see more from Xomatok on Instagram.

Detail, Purificación (2018)

Detail, Purificación (2018)

Oscilación (2017)

Luz del Sur (2018)

Espectro de luz Maxin (2018)

Detail, Espectro de luz Maxin (2018)

Detail, Espectro de luz Maxin (2018)

Detail, Espectro de luz Maxin (2018)

Desktop (2016)

Desktop 2 (2016)

Conexo (2018)

 

 

A Colossal

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