Alive Without Breath: Three Dimensional Animals Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye

Alive Without Breath: Three Dimensional Animals Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye  sculpture resin paint fish animals

Alive Without Breath: Three Dimensional Animals Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye  sculpture resin paint fish animals

Alive Without Breath: Three Dimensional Animals Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye  sculpture resin paint fish animals

Alive Without Breath: Three Dimensional Animals Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye  sculpture resin paint fish animals

Alive Without Breath: Three Dimensional Animals Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye  sculpture resin paint fish animals

Alive Without Breath: Three Dimensional Animals Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye  sculpture resin paint fish animals

Alive Without Breath: Three Dimensional Animals Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye  sculpture resin paint fish animals

Alive Without Breath: Three Dimensional Animals Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye  sculpture resin paint fish animals

Alive Without Breath: Three Dimensional Animals Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye  sculpture resin paint fish animals

Singapore-based artist Keng Lye creates near life-like sculptures of animals relying on little but paint, resin and a phenomenal sense of perspective. Lye slowly fills bowls, buckets, and boxes with alternating layers of acrylic paint and resin, creating aquatic animal life that looks so real it could almost pass for a photograph. The artist is using a technique very similar to Japanese painter Riusuke Fukahori who was featured on this blog a little over a year ago, though Lye seems to take things a step further by making his paint creations protrude from the surface, adding another level of dimension to a remarkable medium. See much more of this series titled Alive Without Breath over on deviantART. (via ian brooks)

Update: I have some additional details from the artist that I’d like to add here, as this post seems to be getting a lot of attention. Via email Lye shares with me:

I started my first series in 2012 where all the illustrations were “flat” and depth was created using the layering of resin and acrylic over the different parts of the illustration. This year, I started on the octopus and it was purely an experiment; I just wanted to see whether I could push this technique to a higher level. After applying acrylic paint straight onto the resin, I incorporated a 3-D element in this instance, it was a small pebble for the ranchu and octopus. For the turtle, I used an egg shell for the turtle shell and acrylic paint for the rest of the finishing. The whole idea here was to give the art work an even more 3D effect therefore you can have a better view from any angle. I think there are still many other techniques to explore.

So to be clear the elements that extrude from the top of the resin are actually physical pieces that have been painted to match the layers of acrylic and resin below.

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