Ephemeral Environmental Sculptures Evoke Cycles of Nature

Ephemeral Environmental Sculptures Evoke Cycles of Nature nature land art

Ephemeral Environmental Sculptures Evoke Cycles of Nature nature land art

Ephemeral Environmental Sculptures Evoke Cycles of Nature nature land art

Ephemeral Environmental Sculptures Evoke Cycles of Nature nature land art

Ephemeral Environmental Sculptures Evoke Cycles of Nature nature land art

Ephemeral Environmental Sculptures Evoke Cycles of Nature nature land art

Ephemeral Environmental Sculptures Evoke Cycles of Nature nature land art

Ephemeral Environmental Sculptures Evoke Cycles of Nature nature land art

Ephemeral Environmental Sculptures Evoke Cycles of Nature nature land art

Ephemeral Environmental Sculptures Evoke Cycles of Nature nature land art

Ephemeral Environmental Sculptures Evoke Cycles of Nature nature land art

For over 20 years environmental artist and photographer Martin Hill has been creating temporary sculptures from ice, stone, and organic materials that reflect nature’s cyclical system. Often working with his longtime partner Philippa Jones, the duo create sculptures and other installations that “metaphorically express concern for the interconnectedness of all living systems.” Speaking specifically about the use of circles Hill shares:

The use of the circle refers to nature’s cyclical system which is now being used as a model for industrial ecology. Sustainability will be achieved by redesigning products and industrial processes as closed loops—materials that can’t safely be returned to nature will be continually turned into new products. Of course this is only one part of the redesign process. We need to use renewable energy, eliminate all poisonous chemicals, use fair trade and create social equity.

You can see much more of Hill’s work in his online gallery, on Flickr, and over on his blog where you can learn about new projects including a major new show titled Watershed for the McClelland Sculpture Park and Gallery that opens in Melbourne in February. (via My Modern Met)