Makoto Azuma Uses the Stratosphere as a Backdrop For His Latest Floral Art

Makoto Azuma Uses the Stratosphere as a Backdrop For His Latest Floral Art space plants photography flowers

Makoto Azuma Uses the Stratosphere as a Backdrop For His Latest Floral Art space plants photography flowers

Makoto Azuma Uses the Stratosphere as a Backdrop For His Latest Floral Art space plants photography flowers

Makoto Azuma Uses the Stratosphere as a Backdrop For His Latest Floral Art space plants photography flowers

Makoto Azuma Uses the Stratosphere as a Backdrop For His Latest Floral Art space plants photography flowers

Makoto Azuma Uses the Stratosphere as a Backdrop For His Latest Floral Art space plants photography flowers

Makoto Azuma Uses the Stratosphere as a Backdrop For His Latest Floral Art space plants photography flowers

Makoto Azuma Uses the Stratosphere as a Backdrop For His Latest Floral Art space plants photography flowers

Makoto Azuma Uses the Stratosphere as a Backdrop For His Latest Floral Art space plants photography flowers

Last week Japanese botanic artist Makoto Azuma attempted to go where most artists only dream of going: to space. In a project titled Exbiotanica, last week Azuma and his crew traveled to Black Rock Desert outside Gerlach, Nevada. In the dead of night Azuma’s project began. The team launched two of Azuma’s artworks – a 50-year old pine suspended from a metal frame and an arrangement of flowers – into the stratosphere using a large helium balloon. The entire project was documented, revealing some surreal photographs of plants floating above planet earth. “The best thing about this project is that space is so foreign to most of us,” says John Powell of JP Aerospace. “So seeing a familiar object like a bouquet of flowers flying above Earth domesticates space, and the idea of traveling into it.” (syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

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