Art Photography

Swirls of Electrifying Ink and Found Crystal Formations Transformed into Hair by Lorna Simpson

May 23, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Brooklyn-based artist Lorna Simpson combines images of black men and women pulled from vintage advertising photos with bright ink washes to give her subjects kaleidoscopic hairstyles erupting with color. The photographs are snipped from old issues of Ebony and Jet magazines and are either layered with ink or found textbook imagery like crystalized growths to explore the deep and varied language of hair. In one piece the subject is adorned with a thick slab of rock, while in another a cross-section of a human brain acts as the subject’s coiffed hairstyle.

Over 150 of these collages have been compiled in her recent book Lorna Simpson Collages, out early next month through Chronicle Books. The volume contains an artist’s statement and an introduction by poet, author, and scholar Elizabeth Alexander who explains, “Black women’s heads of hair are galaxies unto themselves, solar systems, moonscapes, volcanic interiors.”

You can currently preorder the book on Amazon, and view more collages by Simpson on her website.

 

 



Photography Science

A New Aerial Video Captures Staggering Flows of Lava Heading Toward the Pacific in Hawaii

May 23, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Hawaii’s Kīlauea volcano has been erupting since May 3rd, and currently shows no signs of slowing down. The powerful flow of lava is emerging from fissures below the Big Island, pouring over homes, roads, and forests as it rushes downhill towards the sea. The true scope of the eruption is revealed in this aerial footage shot by videographer Mick Kalber. In the video one can hear the roaring of the lava against the helicopter’s whirring blades, creating an ominous soundtrack to the fiery liquid pooling on the ground below.

Kalber has filmed nearly three decades of volcanic eruptions during his time on the island. You can view several more of his videos, including updates on Kilauea’s latest eruption, on his website and Vimeo channel.

 

 



Art

Satirical Images of Virtue and Vice Painted by Toni Hamel

May 23, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"The Impostor (George's Zebra)" (2017), oil and alkyd on cradled panel, 24 x 24 x 1.5 inches, all images via Toni Hammel

“The Impostor (George’s Zebra)” (2017), oil and alkyd on cradled panel, 24 x 24 x 1.5 inches, all images via Toni Hammel

Toronto-based artist Toni Hamel works across mediums to create drawings, paintings, and sculptures that analyze human behavior. In her two-dimensional work the artist often incorporates animals and icebergs being treated as art objects by men in lab coats and smocks. The male subjects are seen analyzing or altering the zebras, giraffes, and whales, painting over their spots or pinning on stripes with a marked precision.

Hamel describes her art practice as an “illustrated commentary of human frailties,” seeking to highlight peculiar behavior in humans. “Drawing from personal experiences and outward observations, I point to historical, social, and psychological references,” she tells Colossal. “Virtues and vices, the holy and the profane, the good and the bad, all share equal weight and supply as infinite source material for my investigations.”

Hamel received her BFA from the Accademia di Belle Arti of Lecce in 1983, and a post-graduate certificate in Computer Graphics from Sheridan College in 1991. You can see more of her satirical works on human behavior on her website and Instagram.

"The Heist" (2017), oil and alkyd on cradled panel, 24 x 24 x 1.5 inches

“The Heist” (2017), oil and alkyd on cradled panel, 24 x 24 x 1.5 inches

"The Watch" (2017), oil and alkyd on cradled panel, 24 x 24 x1.5 inches

“The Watch” (2017), oil and alkyd on cradled panel, 24 x 24 x1.5 inches

"Now You See Me" (2016), oil on Arches oil paper, 15 x 22 inches

“Now You See Me” (2016), oil on Arches oil paper, 15 x 22 inches

"Opening night"(2016), oil on canvas, 24 x 24 inches

“Opening night”(2016), oil on canvas, 24 x 24 inches

"The Pretender" (2016), oil on Arches oil paper, 15 x 22 inches

“The Pretender” (2016), oil on Arches oil paper, 15 x 22 inches

"Ceci n'est pas un arbre (pour Charlie)" (2016), oil on canvas, 16 x 20 inches

“Ceci n’est pas un arbre (pour Charlie)” (2016), oil on canvas, 16 x 20 inches

"Weathermen" (2016), oil on canvas, 24 x 24 inches

“Weathermen” (2016), oil on canvas, 24 x 24 inches

 

 



Design

A Plush Rug Recreates the Grids and Greenways of Manhattan in Colorful Wool

May 22, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

To make it a bit less exhausting to walk across New York City, South African furniture designer Ollie de Wit has recreated the island of Manhattan in a plush, colorful rug. Different pile heights are incorporated to create a sense of dimension, differentiating low-pile streets and waterways from medium-pile housing blocks and tall-pile treetops. The 2 x 3 m (approximately 6.5 x 10 feet) wool rugs are limited to an edition of 25 and are available in Shift Perspective’s online store. You can see more of the studio’s projects and design inspiration on Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art

Richly Textured Portraits of Native Arctic Residents and European Explorers by Preta Wolzak

May 22, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

In her series Ma Petite Inuite and Everybody Needs A Hero, artist Preta Wolzak explores the parallel histories of people on the earth’s poles. Her colorful portraits are constructed of leather, embroidery thread, wool, and glow-in-the-dark twine, combined to depict faces of both the first people of the North and 19th century explorers of the South, including Robert Falcon Scott and Ernest Shackleton.

Wolzak shares with Colossal that she uses her artistic practice to draw attention to the impact that tourism, manifest destiny, and climate change has had particularly on both the North and South Poles. Our exploratory interest in these seemingly far-off places has direct impacts on the people who live close to the Arctic and Antarctic.

Wolzak is represented by Rademakers Gallery in Amsterdam, where her solo show opens on May 24 and is on view until June 17, 2018. You can see more of her work on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Swarovski Crystal Sculptures by Daniel Jacob Immortalize Popsicles, Sneakers, and Other Pop Culture Icons

May 22, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist Daniel Jacob began making art in Chicago in the early 1990s, channeling his ideas into sculptures and works on paper. After spending most of his career in business, he has returned to his love of art. His current practice experiments with crystals and stones to create pop culture-inspired sculptures of dripping popsicles, Air Jordan sneakers, animals, and elements of city infrastructure, like sewer grates.

Each of Jacob’s works begin as three-dimensional scans which are then sculpted into cast resin and finally topped by hand with hundreds of thousands of multi-colored Swarovski crystals. A few of Jacob’s sculptures are currently on view at the recently opened Nonfinito Gallery in New York through May 31, 2018. You can see more of the artist’s work on his website and Instagram.

 

 



Design

Uplift: An Endlessly Rotating Stair Sculpture Powered by the Sun

May 21, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Uplift is a architecturally-minded desk sculpture that slowly rotates using the power of the sun. The walnut work hovers inside a glass bell jar, powered by a steel and brass mechanism that allows the staircase endlessly rotate. The mesmerizing design was invented by friends Tom Lawton and Ben Jandrell, seasoned inventors who spent the last two years optimizing the technology behind the spinning object.

The first generation of Uplift sculptures are currently produced by the pair in Lawton’s home town of Malmesbury, UK, and are being funded through Kickstarter. You can see more of Lawton’s inventions, like this motion-activated running light he co-invented with Jandrell, on his website.