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New Environmental Street Art by ROA

December 9, 2013

Johnny Strategy

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photo © ROA

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photo © Jaime Rojo/BrooklynStreetArt.com

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photo © Jaime Rojo/BrooklynStreetArt.com

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photo © Jaime Rojo/BrooklynStreetArt.com

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photo © Jaime Rojo/BrooklynStreetArt.com

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photo © ROA

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photo © ROA

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photo © ROA

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photo © ROA

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photo © ROA

It’s hard to keep up with Belgian street artist ROA (previously here and here), who has been bringing his spray-painted monochromatic depictions of animals to all corners of the globe. This year he’s been to Portugal, Austria, Canada and the U.K. (just to name a few), and then to the U.S.

“I wanted to draw attention to how they and many other species become a victim of hunting and pollution,” says ROA, referring to a piece he did in Sweden of a narwhal caught in a fishing line. Indeed, ROA’s works are often accompanied by an environmental narrative that highlights the ruthless, man-made world animals are forced to live in. You can see much more of ROA’s work over on Brooklyn Street Art.

 

 



Art

Metazoa: Mixed-Media Cabinets by ‘ROA’ Reveal the Hidden Anatomy of Animals

April 14, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Composition II: Lutrinate, Salmonidae, Anguilliformes

Belgian artist ROA (previously) just opened his first solo show at Jonathan LeVine Gallery in NYC titled Metazoa. The new series of mixed media works feature the artist’s familiar black and white depictions of animals painted on various cabinet-like furniture pieces that can be opened or shifted to reveal anatomical details. ROA often chooses to depict animals native to where he is working, specifically species that have been forced from their native habitats and now live on the outskirts of urban areas. Here’s a comment about ROA’s decision to depict the beaver, New York’s state animal, via Jonathan LeVine:

ROA views the beaver, the state animal of New York, as a metaphor for the idea that nature has the ability to reclaim itself. The recovery of the beaver in New York City after it was previously thought extinct is exemplary of how humans and animals affect each other and reflects the artist’s interest in how animals evolve within urban landscapes. Wherever man settles, the desire to explore beyond the borders of survival leads to the extinction of species. This extermination due to mankind’s impact not only disrupts the natural balance but also leads to drastic cosmic changes, which ROA aims to convey by depicting the life, transience and carrion of animals.

Metazoa will be on view through May 2, and you can see plenty more gallery views and an interview with the artist during a studio visit on Arrested Motion from earlier this year.

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Composition I: Castor, Didelphimorphia, Sciuridae

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Composition I: Castor, Didelphimorphia, Sciuridae (DETAIL)

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Cervidae Tableau Dormant

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Composition III: Alligatoridae, Testudinidae, Gastropoda

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Erethizon Dorsatum

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NY Canidae

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Sylvilagus Audubonii

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Cabinet Specula Crania

 

 



Art

Lenticular Street Art by Roa

April 15, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Back in 2009 artist Roa (previously here and here) painted this amazing lenticular street artwork on Curtain Road in London. Depending on the angle of viewing the art shifts between the fuzzy exterior of a rabbit to an illustrated interior of its circulatory system, a trick he used late last year here in Chicago to pretty gruesome effect. You can see much more of Roa’s work over on Flickr which seems to be updated most frequently. (via twisted sifter)

 

 



Art

ROA Stacks African Animals on a Building Facade in Johannesburg

October 30, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Street artist ROA was recently in Johannesburg where he created this epic new work featuring six enormous African animals lounging on the side of a building. ROA’s work has been popping up everywhere lately including a stop here in Chicago just last month. See many more photos of this latest piece shot by Martha Cooper over on I Art Joburg.

 

 



Art

Fun New Murals by ROA Utilize Tunisia’s Domed Architecture

August 1, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Belgian street artist ROA (previously) is currently in Tunisia along with 150 other participating artists for Galerie Itinerrance’s Djerbahood open air museum project in Djerba, Tunisia. The artist cleverly took advantage of the many domed buildings in the city for several of his monochromatic spray paint murals that spread across multiple surfaces. You can see more recent pieces on the Djerbahood website. (via Savage Habit, Street Art News)

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Art

Gargantuan Street Murals by Aryz

April 9, 2014

Johnny Strategy

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“Overprotection” | Linz, Austria 2014

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“Double Tie” | Sanlúcar de Barrameda, Spain 2013

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Oslo, Norway 2013

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“Grateful death” | Köln, Germany 2013

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“feat. OsGemeos” | Lodz, Poland 2012

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“Rotten apples” | San Francisco, USA 2013

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“Monkey Business” | St. Denis, Reunion Island 2012

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“love letter” | Lodz, Poland 2012

If you’re trying to find the globe-trotting Spanish street artist Aryz, you’ll have to look up. Because in whatever city he happens to be in, the prominent artist will typically be hoisted 100ft above street level converting large building facades into public canvases. And buildings aren’t the only thing he’s climbed. At just 25 years of age, Aryz (pronounced “Areez”) has risen to be amongst the top ranks of world-renowned street artists like Banksy and ROA.

Aryz was born in Palo Alto but moved back to Spain when he was just three. He began painting (in the form of graffiti) as a teenager, and his style evolved – in part, from his art studies in college – to what it is today. Bones are a recurring motif in the artist’s work, and so are skin-like muted colors. “I feel it’s really aggressive when you paint in a public space, so I don’t really want to play with bright colors,” said Aryz. “It would be too much.”

Have a look at some of his latest pieces, which includes the artist’s most latest: “Overprotection,” painted in late March, on a large industrial building in Linz, Austria. You can follow the artist on Facebook or Instagram.