Art

Section



Art Dance

Wild Balloon Creatures Overtake the Streets of New York in Jason Hackenwerth’s Animal Soul

July 17, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

All photos by Jason Hackenwerth except as noted

In Animal Soul, a fleeting exhibition at Brookfield Place in New York City, artist Jason Hackenwerth (previously) brought to life a menagerie of inflatable creatures. Born from his wild imagination, the interactive inflatable artworks included wearable “Megamite” costumes sported by professional dancers, and towering fabric creatures that soared above the crowds. You can see more from Hackenwerth on Instagram.

Photo: Charles Lenoir

Photo: Charles Lenoir

The Diety. #Woooohooo @bfpl_ny #gitit @klkitchen

A post shared by Jason Hackenwerth (@hackenwerth) on

 

 



Art Illustration

A Centuries-Old Art Form Hides Within the Gilded Pages of Antique Books

July 17, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Martin Frost creates paintings in places that people can’t see, or can only find if they know exactly where to look. The UK-based artist is a fore-edge painter, which means he produces elaborate designs and scenes along the edges of gilded books. The works are discovered only when you fan the pages in a certain way, and become hidden by the book’s gold edges as soon it is closed. “It is a discrete painting,” Frost tells Great Big Story. “It is only there when you know how to unlock it.”

Vanishing fore-edge painting dates back to about 1660, but didn’t become popular until the 18th-century. Frost has practiced the rare art form for the last 40 years, and as far as he knows, is the last commercial fore-edge painter in the world. You can view more of his hidden paintings, in addition to a series of illuminated miniatures, on his website. (via Great Big Story)

 

 



Art Craft

Complex Cuts Form New Detailed Paper Sea Creatures, Flowers, and Reptiles

July 17, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Japanese cut paper artist Riki Fukuda (previously) continues to create mind-bogglingly detailed designs using simple tools: a cutting mat, blade, and paper. The artist shares her in-progress and finished works on Twitter, including the pencil sketches that she cuts into for her final works. More recently, Fukuda has been working on smaller-scale creations and experimenting with holographic paper. You can stay up to date with new work by following her on Twitter.

 

 

 



Art Photography

Temporary Installations Create Winding Paths Through a Forest in the South of England

July 17, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

For her 2011 series Come With Me, UK-based artist Ellie Davies (previously) constructed pathways through the New Forest in the South of England where she grew up. The pathways, built from wool, powder, paint, and mounds of dirt, follow the natural curvature of the trees and create a weaving line through space. The installations are each created with an intuitive spontaneity, and incorporate the labor as a central concept to the work. Davies carefully cleans up all the materials after she documents each trail. The photographer recently had a solo exhibition titled Into the Woods with A. galerie in Brussels. You can see more of her forest-based installations and digital compositions on her website and Facebook. (via Ignant)

 

 



Art

Organic Shapes Emerge in New Installations of Intertwined Rope by Janaina Mello Landini

July 13, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Ciclotrama 115 (writing) (Homage a Baron Marcel Bich). 2018. Dimensions: 180x260cm Materials: 80m of 24mm nylon rope, sailcloth Photo: Emilie Mathé Nicolas

Using lengths of colored nylon rope, installation artist Janaina Mello Landini (previously) creates complicated networks of intertwining threads. The unwound rope ends tangle and reach in a giant game of Twister, resulting in sculptural installations that bring to mind the natural patterns found in neural networks, blood vessels, and tree roots. One recent piece, Ciclotrama 50, is a permanent installation at Foundation Carmignac, a French island museum that opened this spring.  You can explore more of Landini’s portfolio on her website and Instagram.

Ciclotrama 115 (detail)

Ciclotrama 115 (alternate view)

Ciclotrama 50. Permanent Site-specific Foundation Carmignac, Porquerolles, France. Photo: Janaina Mello Landini Dimensions: 5,5m x 1,4m x 12m. Materials: 20m of 24mm diameter nylon rope, golden nails

Ciclotrama 50 (alternate view)

Ciclotrama 50 (alternate view)

Ciclotrama 50 (alternate view)

CICLOTRAMA 114 (2018) Photo: Gui Gomes. Dimensions: 2 x 3m. Materials: 15 m of nylon rope 24mm diameter on embroidered sailcloth, stainless cleat

 

 



Art

Swaths of Old-Fashioned Fabric Obscure Faces and Bodies in Unsettling Portraits by Markus Åkesson

July 13, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

“Now You See Me” (2018), oil on canvas, 180 x 140cm

In his paintings, Swedish artist Markus Åkesson depicts ornately patterned fabrics like toile, chintz, and silks wrapped around female subjects. Instead of using the old-fashioned textiles simply as signifiers of wealth and tradition, he uses the materials to take on a more sinister tone. In some of the paintings you can see expressions of sadness in the subject’s faces, while in others, the textiles completely overtake the figures beneath, obscuring their identity and emotions.

“As a child, I often sat and looked at the different patterns in textiles and tapestries,” Åkesson shares with Colossal. “I would find my own images in them, my own world, and I would dream away. For me, the pattern as a concept has a built in feeling of safety and stability, because it repeats itself over and over again. I think the use of patterns in images that depicts more melancholic or even disturbing scenes makes a interesting feeling of duality.”

The artist is represented by Galerie Da-End in Paris and VIDA Museum in Öland, Sweden, where he recently had a solo show. You can see more of Åkesson’s work on Instagram. (via I Need A Guide)

“Now You See Me (Opium)” (2018), oil on canvas, 180 x 140cm

“No One Can See You (Dysmorphia)” (2017), oil on canvas, 50 x 60cm

“No One Can See You (Dysmorphia II)” (2017), oil on canvas, 50 x 60cm

“Palmistry” (2016), oil on canvas, 100 x 120cm

“I Never Wanted You To Leave” (2016), oil on canvas, 210 x 180cm

“The Unicorn Hunt ll” (2017), oil on canvas, 200 x 170cm

 

 



Art Craft

Felted Wildlife Perch on Found Objects in Charming Sculptures by Simon Brown

July 11, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Simon Brown sources worn-out household tools like brushes and thimbles and turns them into miniature scenes for his felted wildlife. A short, stiff brush becomes a tree branch for a perching owl, and a dense hair brush with swirling bristles forms a meadow for two rabbits. Brown, who is based in Northumbria, United Kingdom, uses needle felting to create his realistic forest creatures. You can see more of his finished and in-progress work on Instagram. (via Bored Panda)

 

 

A Colossal

Highlight

Advanced Yoga Joes