Art

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Art

Mesmerizing New Collages by Lola Dupré Distort the Human Form into Gravity-Defying Shapes

May 21, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

For Satellite Journal / Photography and styling: Tre and Elmaz / Model: Genevieve Welsh

Collage artist Lola Dupré (previously) continues to create mind-boggling manipulations of photographs in her surreal style. The Scotland-based artist cuts images into thousands of shards and arranges them to create her intricate collages. In rearranging the photo fragments, Dupré adds unusual elongations of faces and limbs, multiplies eyes and mouths, and bends bodies in defiance of gravity and anatomy. Her work is often commissioned for magazine editorials—included here are several examples of recent projects. You can see more of the artist’s surreal creations on her website (where originals are for sale), as well as on tumblr and Behance. She also shares her process on Instagram.

For Satellite Journal / Photography and styling: Tre and Elmaz / Model: Genevieve Welsh

For Satellite Journal / Photography and styling: Tre and Elmaz / Model: Genevieve Welsh

Diptera / Photography: Denef Huvaj

For Le Mile Magazine / Photography: Alexandre Felix / Model: Nala Luuna Diagouraga

For Agapornis Magazine / Photography: César Segarra / Styling: Laura Mata / Model: Salva Lopez

Reinvention of the Soul II – Anticlone Embodied for Glassbook / Creative Director and Model: Sade English / Photographer: Warren King

For Eye Republic Magazine / Photography: Lisa Carletta / Model: Bee

Charlie I

Emmanuel Macron

 

 



Art

Polygon-Wrapped Floral Arrangements by Norihiko Terayama

May 18, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Japanese designer Norihiko Terayama suspends simple floral arrangements in polygonal forms, contrasting the organic material with straight, meticulous lines. With the simple addition of pins and thread his series Crust of the Polygon reframes the dried plants as poetic sculptures. Another one of his series, Polygon of Tree Branch, features full branches encased in a similar geometric style.

Terayama studied at Design Academy Eindhoven where he trained under designer Richard Hutten and was immersed in Dutch conceptual design. His company Studio Note designs home and lifestyle products which often incorporate natural elements. You can see more projects by the Japanese designer on his website.

   

 

 



Art Design

Luscious Handmade Glass Orchids by Laura Hart Reflect Plants’ Exotic Beauty

May 17, 2018

Anna Marks

Glass Miltonia Orchid

Colorful orchids, identical in size, bloom in UK artist Laura Hart’s studio. From their bilateral symmetry to their splashes of pigment, the glass designer’s perfectly crafted forms illustrate the strange exotic beauty of the plant species. With their soft and fleshy glass petals, Hart’s botanical sculptures appear as fully bloomed flower heads, each of which has a different pattern to reflect the diversity of the species. “My fascination with orchids spans decades and at one point I had nearly seventy in my conservatory,” Hart tells Colossal. “The explosion of color and perfume during the flowering months intoxicate the senses.”

Hart’s route to making glass sculptures has been a convoluted path alongside many creative pursuits. “Beginning with oils and canvas at around the age of twelve, treading the boards at seventeen, video production in my twenties and thirties, heritage building renovation, 3D animation design in my forties, and, at last, the glorious world of glass in my fifties,” she says.

Hart was unexpectedly brought to glass when asked to design a sculpture in steel and glass for a concept artist, and hasn’t looked back since. “I needed to better understand the glass making process in order to achieve the design, so I observed some wonderfully talented glass artists at work. I was utterly captivated and there the obsession began.”

Glass Phalaenopsis Orchid

Each flower is about twelve inches (thirty cm) in diamteter, and takes Hart up to ten days to make. She tries to recreate the species as faithfully and authentically as possible, whilst imbuing them with her artistic interpretation.

The artist creates orchid-shaped moulds using 3D modeling and animation software. “The templates for each flower are animated into shapes to simulate glass flow within the kiln to ensure that every flower will slump into the correct shape without stressing the glass in the process,” Hart explains.

Glass Fuciflora Bee Orchid

Hart then cuts each petal individually and uses glass powders and frits for the first firing. “Veining is then applied from hair fine strands of glass created by pulling thin shards of glass through a flame.  There can be as many as six firing processes to achieve the final result. The flowers are then sandblasted to create a satin sheen, and coated with a waterproof spray to bring out the color and prevent finger marks.”

The three-dimensional details in Hart’s glass orchids are added from cutting sheet glass which are applied to the petals and re-fired. “Once all the detail and color is applied to each petal they are fused together to create the flat flower shape. Finally, the flower is placed on the mould and fired to slump position.”

To view more of Hart’s delicate floral sculptures visit her website, Facebook, and Twitter.

Glass Caulocattleya ‘Chantilly Lace’ Orchid

Glass Ballerina Orchid

Glass Oncidium Orchid

Glass Phalanopsis Lindenii Orchid

Glass Thelymitra Pulcherrima Orchid

Glass Vanda Loki Orchid

Glass Phalaenopsis (moth) Orchid

 

 



Art Design

Swing House: A Three-Story Swing Suspended from the Ceiling of a Gutted Cincinnati Home by Mark deJong

May 17, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All images © Hailey Bollinger

All images © Hailey Bollinger

From the outside, artist Mark deJong’s contemporary installation, Swing House, doesn’t particularly stand out from the other residences lining the street of Cincinnati’s Camp Washington neighborhood. The blue 19th-century building is narrowly built, and features charming architectural details that cap its windows and roof. The interior however, is remarkably different. All three levels of the home have been completely gutted to create an open floor plan void of any interior walls or floors, with a single swing positioned at the center of the space.

Swing House is a piece of art in itself,” deJong tells Colossal. “All of my major decisions were based on the arc of the swing, which started by emptying out everything on the inside. The arc of the swing then dictated where the stairs to the basement went, as well as the placement of the bed and kitchen. While swinging, your feet miss those things with a considered clearance. You are able to swing way over both the bed and kitchen.”

The seat of the swing was formed from reddish pine salvaged from inside the home. Its natural-fiber rope attachments extend 30-feet into the air, and are secured into a metal beam from the home’s three-story ceiling. It is here that deJong painted a black and white hour glass shape, a nod to the motif of passing time represented in the pendulum-like swing.

The installation took three years to build, but had been a dream of deJong’s for nearly thirty. He originally thought of the idea shortly after finishing art school. “I stopped making art for 20 years, so this house was my leap back into the art world,” he explains. He has worked in construction for the past several decades, so this art-based house was a way for him to marry his formal training with his lifelong career. 

DeJong is currently renovating another house on the same street which will also be mostly gutted, except for as set of freestanding stairs which will serve as the main focus. Objects created from salvaged elements of the Swing House are currently on view at his solo exhibition of the same name, which runs through September 2, 2018 at the Cincinnati Contemporary Arts Center. Tours of the home will occur throughout the duration of the exhibition. (via CityBeat)

The outside of Swing House in the Camp Washington neighborhood of Cincinnati, Ohio. Since the photo was taken, the home has been renovated with landscaping and other details that preserve the home's original character.

The outside of Swing House in the Camp Washington neighborhood of Cincinnati, Ohio. Since the photo was taken, the home has been renovated with landscaping and other details that preserve the home’s original character.

 

 



Art

Multi-Layered Lettering Challenges the Aesthetics of Graffiti in New Works by Pref

May 16, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

British graffiti artist Pref explores words and common phrases through unique multi-layered murals. His 3D text is used to create amalgamations of quippy sayings, often placing one word inside of another to give a piece multiple perspectives. In the work below a turquoise “more” subtly shifts into a salmon “less” simply by a twist of the viewer’s head.

Since he got his start nearly two decades ago, Pref has been interested in challenging graffiti’s aesthetic, working with typography to bring a more accessible appearance to painted text. At first the street artist worked with the negative space between letters, which eventually became letters themselves. This transformed into his signature style of combined texts, which he has been exploring since 2010.

“Since then I have pushed and experimented with this idea of overlapping words, seeing how many I can fit into the space of one word, and then slowly boiling it down and simplifying this idea to become more legible,” he tells Colossal. “This in turn lead more to the use of ‘typography’ throughout my style as you see today. I have always been interested in the idea of graffiti speaking to the general public, rather than just other graffiti writers, and readable letters or a more ‘typographic’ approach has been a good route to that.”

Recently Pref partnered with fellow typographic street artist Gary Stranger to launch a collective titled Typograffic Circle. The group unites artists working in the type-based street art subgenre, and their first self-titled group show is on view through June 3, 2018 at London’s StolenSpace. The exhibition features work by Georgia Hill, Saïd KinosAll Type No Face, along with Pref and Stranger. You can see more of Pref’s recent work on his Instagram and buy select prints through his Big Cartel.

 

 



Art

Unusual Animals Brought Together in New Hyperrealistic Paintings by Lisa Ericson

May 16, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Flock

New work from Lisa Ericson (previously) continues the Portland-based artist’s hyperrealistic compositions of animals. Set on deep black backgrounds, her paintings showcase unusual combinations of peacefully co-existing fauna. Pelicans support rabbits, snakes, and ocelots, while tree frogs and songbirds find homes on the shells of turtles. Her most recent paintings are on view through May 25 at Antler Gallery in Portland, in a show titled Invisible Promise, alongside work from Scottish artist Lindsey Carr. You can see more from Ericson on Instagram.

After The Flood

Stowaway

Distant Shore

Uneasy Truce

Oasis

Haven

 

 



Art

Waterline: Pejac Unveils New Drawings to Be Exhibited in a Floating Gallery on Paris’ Seine River

May 15, 2018

Sasha Bogojev

Continuously secretive and unexpected when it comes to revealing his projects, Pejac (previously) once again surprised the art world by announcing an upcoming self-produced pop-up solo exhibition in Paris. Roughly a year since his last showing at an old gondola workshop on the canals of Venice, and a month since his surprise visit to NYC, the Spanish artist just announced this new show titled Waterline.

To exhibit this selection of new work, Pejac found an old péniche boat that will be transformed into an unconventional floating art gallery from June 20-24th, 2018. Moored right next to Notre-Dame cathedral, this vintage vessel will host his most intimate show to date, presenting a large series of accomplished studio drawings. Works on paper are a crucial part of Pejac’s creative process and are usually the first step toward large public interventions or canvases, but are truly artworks in their own right.

“What people get to see on paper, on canvas, on a wall, or as a finished sculpture, is the end of a very long trip that starts inside of you.  When I start painting or drawing, that is the end, not the beginning of the process. Before that happens, I have already tried so many different ideas and made so many choices.” —Pejac for Spring issue of Juxtapoz Magazine

By showcasing previously unseen works, Waterline will grant the most direct look at the unmediated stage of the artist’s practice. Created mostly with charcoal or pencil on paper, these images are the early stages of concepts we’ve already seen turn into large pieces, or might still evolve into their final versions. Poetic and despairing, these striking pictures propose an unconventional future focused on the ways in which humans treat resources and the environment, as well as current socio-political issues and “modern society” values. You can see more of Pejac’s recent work on Instagram.