Category: Art

Illuminated Portraits of Live Portuguese Man o’ War Captured by Aaron Ansarov 

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An ex-military photographer, Aaron Ansarov retired from the Navy in 2007, transforming his skills to create commercial work for magazines and focus on his own practice. Fascinated with marine life since his days growing up in Central Florida, his series “Zooids,” focuses on detailed images of Portuguese Man o’ War. Ansarov photographs the creatures on a homemade light table while alive, then immediately releases them back into the wild where they were found.

Once shot and the Man o’ War are returned, each image receives minimal manipulation, as Ansarov makes only slight adjustments to the photograph’s exposure, contrast, and vibrancy to highlight the vivid details of each venomous siphonophore. The completed works are otherworldly, appearing like alien illustrations rather than portraits, with deep blues, purples, and pinks unfurling in every direction. You can see more of Ansarov’s illuminated images on Facebook and Instagram. (via Fubiz)

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Organic Creatures Crafted from Plastic Cable Ties by Sui Park 

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Amoeba. Fish. Sea anemone. Aliens. These are all fair interpretations of Korean artist Sui Park's sculptures and installations made from interlocked cable ties. Weaving together the plastic fasteners she creates undulating organic surfaces or swarms of creatures that swim in schools and cluster together like eggs. Park recently had a solo exhibition titled ‘Playing with Perception’ at Denise Bibro Fine Art and currently has work on view at Summer Sculpture Showcase 2016 in Connecticut. You can see more of her work on Behance.

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Technicolor Rainbow Tape Floor Installations by Jim Lambie 

Collectively titled Zobop, Jim Lambie's vinyl tape installations mark off floors and stairs with colorful and repeating patterns, typically consisting of seven to nine rotating hues. The site-specific works conform to the architectural outline of each space, tracing the sharp edges of moulding or square bases of monumental columns. To begin each new work Lambie first outlines the widest possible edge, typically starting where the floor meets the wall. From here, he alternates widths for his lines, mixing up thin strips with those that are a couple of inches thick until he reaches the center of each space.

Lambie’s first work in Zobop was completed in 1999 during a solo exhibition of the same name at The Showroom in London. Since this first exhibition, Lambie has continued to make the concentric works, using materials that could be easily accessed at any office supply store. You can see more of his colorful installations at Anton Kern Gallery. (via Contemporary Art Blog)

Image via My Pet Buffalo

Image via My Pet Buffalo

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An Antique Piano Cut in Half, Connected Only by a Wishbone 

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We’ve long marveled at artist Maskull Lasserre's masterful ability to carve anatomical details into everyday objects. One of his recent sculptures, titled Improbable Worlds, is no exception. For this piece the Canadian artist split an old upright piano in two, slicing through every last component leaving only a single point of connection: a tiny wishbone carved from the wooden piano back. The visual tension created by the piece is astounding, let alone the head-scratching question of how he technically accomplished it, knowing that if the weight of the piano shifted just slightly the piece would snap in half.

You can see more of Lasserre’s recent artworks in his portfolio.

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Hand-Cut Mandalas and Other Intricate Paper Works by Mr. Riu 

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All images via @mr_riu

Japanese artist Mr. Riu takes paper cutting to an intricate extreme, crafting mandalas and elaborate figures with a precision work tool called the swivel knife. This tool allows him to cut curves more fluidly, as the head of the knife can turn 360 degrees. With this movement, Riu produces asymmetrical imagery that is often filled with hidden details—winged horses that sprout from points in a star and snakes that wrap themselves around the eyes of his figural works.

Riu’s captions for his Instagram images are often inspirational and speak to the dedication and patience he has developed during his paper cutting practice. “It’s not that I can do it because I originally have a great patience,” says Riu in one of his captions, “I think that my patience grows stronger gradually because I want to do it.”

You can see more of Mr. Riu’s work on his Instagram and blog.

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