Art

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Art

Organic Shapes Emerge in New Installations of Intertwined Rope by Janaina Mello Landini

July 13, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Ciclotrama 115 (writing) (Homage a Baron Marcel Bich). 2018. Dimensions: 180x260cm Materials: 80m of 24mm nylon rope, sailcloth Photo: Emilie Mathé Nicolas

Using lengths of colored nylon rope, installation artist Janaina Mello Landini (previously) creates complicated networks of intertwining threads. The unwound rope ends tangle and reach in a giant game of Twister, resulting in sculptural installations that bring to mind the natural patterns found in neural networks, blood vessels, and tree roots. One recent piece, Ciclotrama 50, is a permanent installation at Foundation Carmignac, a French island museum that opened this spring.  You can explore more of Landini’s portfolio on her website and Instagram.

Ciclotrama 115 (detail)

Ciclotrama 115 (alternate view)

Ciclotrama 50. Permanent Site-specific Foundation Carmignac, Porquerolles, France. Photo: Janaina Mello Landini Dimensions: 5,5m x 1,4m x 12m. Materials: 20m of 24mm diameter nylon rope, golden nails

Ciclotrama 50 (alternate view)

Ciclotrama 50 (alternate view)

Ciclotrama 50 (alternate view)

CICLOTRAMA 114 (2018) Photo: Gui Gomes. Dimensions: 2 x 3m. Materials: 15 m of nylon rope 24mm diameter on embroidered sailcloth, stainless cleat

 

 



Art

Swaths of Old-Fashioned Fabric Obscure Faces and Bodies in Unsettling Portraits by Markus Åkesson

July 13, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

“Now You See Me” (2018), oil on canvas, 180 x 140cm

In his paintings, Swedish artist Markus Åkesson depicts ornately patterned fabrics like toile, chintz, and silks wrapped around female subjects. Instead of using the old-fashioned textiles simply as signifiers of wealth and tradition, he uses the materials to take on a more sinister tone. In some of the paintings you can see expressions of sadness in the subject’s faces, while in others, the textiles completely overtake the figures beneath, obscuring their identity and emotions.

“As a child, I often sat and looked at the different patterns in textiles and tapestries,” Åkesson shares with Colossal. “I would find my own images in them, my own world, and I would dream away. For me, the pattern as a concept has a built in feeling of safety and stability, because it repeats itself over and over again. I think the use of patterns in images that depicts more melancholic or even disturbing scenes makes a interesting feeling of duality.”

The artist is represented by Galerie Da-End in Paris and VIDA Museum in Öland, Sweden, where he recently had a solo show. You can see more of Åkesson’s work on Instagram. (via I Need A Guide)

“Now You See Me (Opium)” (2018), oil on canvas, 180 x 140cm

“No One Can See You (Dysmorphia)” (2017), oil on canvas, 50 x 60cm

“No One Can See You (Dysmorphia II)” (2017), oil on canvas, 50 x 60cm

“Palmistry” (2016), oil on canvas, 100 x 120cm

“I Never Wanted You To Leave” (2016), oil on canvas, 210 x 180cm

“The Unicorn Hunt ll” (2017), oil on canvas, 200 x 170cm

 

 



Art Craft

Felted Wildlife Perch on Found Objects in Charming Sculptures by Simon Brown

July 11, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Simon Brown sources worn-out household tools like brushes and thimbles and turns them into miniature scenes for his felted wildlife. A short, stiff brush becomes a tree branch for a perching owl, and a dense hair brush with swirling bristles forms a meadow for two rabbits. Brown, who is based in Northumbria, United Kingdom, uses needle felting to create his realistic forest creatures. You can see more of his finished and in-progress work on Instagram. (via Bored Panda)

 

 



Art

Lifelike Eyes Clustered Together in Striking Abstract Portraits by Emilio Villalba

July 11, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

San Francisco-based painter Emilio Villalba creates abstract portraits inspired by the precision of master works from the past. His paintings are set against white backgrounds that partially cover or obscure large clusters of diverse, hyperrealistic eyes, which are each painted from photographs of posed family members or friends. Villalba feels more comfortable capturing the feelings in familiar subjects’ faces rather than strangers, an element which he presents in his emotive work.

“Subtle shifts, repetition, (re)placement, or absence of facial features are attempts to create a feeling of dissonance and pressure in the viewer,” explains Villalba in an artist statement. “I want someone to be drawn in by the uncanny nature of a piece and still feel safe to explore the feelings and reactions the pressure gives rise to.”

You can see more of the artist’s paintings of eyes and other facial features on his website and Instagram.

          

 

 



Art Craft

New Miniature Lace Scenes by Ágnes Herczeg Capture Quiet Domestic Moments

July 11, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Hungarian fiber artist Ágnes Herczeg (previously) continues to create delicate depictions of quiet moments. Formed from colorful lace and found wood, each small scene floats in mid-air and is attached to a piece of wood. Whereas in previous work, Herczeg used unusually shaped wood fragments as part of the figural elements of the scenes, in her more recent pieces the wood acts as a frame. You can see more of the artist’s work on her website and Instagram.

 

 



Art

Towering Portraits by Ryan Hewett Mix Blocks of Bright Colors with Gestural Impasto

July 10, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

South African painter Ryan Hewett creates striking portraits through a Cubist lens, breaking the subject’s face and body into a amalgamation of brightly colored shapes and thickly painted marks. His impasto technique contrasts with his smoothly painted lines and surfaces, bringing a chaotic element  to the crisp edges of his figural works.

Hewett’s solo exhibition, The Garden, runs through July 22, 2018 at Unit London. You can see more of his recent paintings for this exhibition and more on his Instagram. (via INAG)

 

 



Art Craft

Massive Circular Weavings by Tammy Kanat Combine Intuitive Pattern-Making and Natural Fibers

July 10, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

“Young Heart” (2018), wool, linen, silk, mohair, fibers and copper frame, 120 x 80 cm. All photographs by Emily Weaving, courtesy of the artist

Australian fiber artist Tammy Kanat uses unique combinations of richly textured fabrics and materials to form large-scale abstract wall weavings. The former jewelry designer began weaving in 2011, when she trained at the Australian Tapestry Workshop. Using an organically shaped ovoid metal frame, Kanat works in colorful natural materials like wool, mohair, silk, hemp, and jute to create her sculptural pieces. You can see more of creations on the artist’s Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

“Blue Topaz” (2017), wool, linen, silk, fibers, and copper frame, 100cm diameter

“Circle of Color” (2017), wool, linen, silk, fibers, and copper frame, 100cm diameter

“Brave Heart” (2018), wool, linen, silk, fibers, and copper frame, 150 x 210 cm

“Destiny” (2017), tapestry wool and copper frame, 100cm diameter

“Pattern Play” (2018), wool, linen, silk fibers, and copper frame, 100cm diameter

“Wilderness” (2018), wool, linen, silk, fibers, and copper frame, 150cm diameter