Category: Art

Colorful New Architectural Watercolors by Maja Wronska

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Polish watercolor artist Maja Wronska continues to paint explosively colorful depictions of European architecture, most recently in Poznań, Poland. Wronska is an architect herself, a skill that greatly enhances her artwork. She first renders each piece as a detailed drawing and then adds layers of watercolor, an unpredictable medium that can be difficult to control, making her paintings all the more incredible. You can see much more over on Behance, and several of these are currently available as prints.

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Unsettling Ceramic Tableware by Ronit Baranga Incorporates Realistic Mouths and Fingers

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Israeli ceramicist Ronit Baranga‘s “body of work” is unsettling, to say the least. Sculpted from clay, realistic fingers emerge from plates while mouths lurk inside cups. The gnarled fingers and lips seem poised for action. We would most certainly hesitate before using any of these for fear of being bitten.

The mouth is an interesting element for ceramic tableware as its main purpose, at least conventionally, has been to carry food and drink until it reaches the mouth. “I chose to deal with ‘mouth’ as a metaphoric connotation to a border gate,” said Baranga in an interview late last year. “A border between the inner body and the external environment surrounding it.”

Ronit Baranga’s curious works, which blur the border between living and still, were most recently part of the two group exhibitions at Bet-Binyamini Contemporary Ceramics Center in Tel-Aviv. (via I Need A Guide)

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Breath: A Stunning New Collection Film Exploring How We Breathe

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Over the past few years the production team at The Mercadantes (formerly known as Everynone) have created a legendary reputation for their unique brand of collection films, where similar objects, ideas, or actions are gathered into a video montage. If you haven’t seen Words, Ball, or especially Symmetry, I recommend spending the next 20 minutes of your life doing that. Their latest film is Breath, a meditation on the myriad ways in which people breath. While it may not sound like much in a description, the short packs an emotional wallop, bouncing between the extremes of life and death to fear and passion. Directed and edited by Daniel Mercadante.

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New Moon: An Interactive Light Installation Made from 5,500 Repurposed Light Bulbs

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New Moon is an interactive shadow and light sculpture from artists Caitlind r.c. Brown and Wayne Garrett (previously) that was installed twice in Lexington, Kentucky back in February of last year. Built from 5,500 burnt out incandescent bulbs donated by the community, the sculpture allows viewers to manipulate phases of the moon using a large turnstyle. The piece is the fourth in a series of installations using re-appropriated light bulbs, more of which you can explore on their website.

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Delicate Vessels Sculpted with Pressed Flowers by Ignacio Canales Aracil

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Spanish artist Ignacio Canales Aracil creates vessels reminiscent of upside-down baskets using nothing but pressed flowers. The art of flower pressing dates back thousands of years; pressed flowers were reportedly discovered in a 3,000-year-old coffin of Tutankhamun’s mother in Egypt, and both Greek and Roman botanists were known to preserve plants using techniques that continue today. But Aracil’s method is a bit different, relying on large cone-shaped molds into which carefully woven patches of hand-picked flower stems are placed. The pieces dry for up to a month without the aid of adhesives and are sprayed with a light varnish to protect the sculpture from moisture. The final pieces, which could be crushed with even the slightest weight, are rigid enough to stand without support.

Aracil currently has work as part of a group show at Lucia Mendoza gallery in Madrid through the end of February, and you can see much more over on his website.

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Mushroom Book Installations by Melissa Jay Craig

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Cast and hand-shaped abaca, embellished with cotton rag; each copy 14-18″H x 15″W x 16-18″D. Edition of 99.

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(S)Edition is an installation of 99 books made to look like common Amanita Muscaria mushrooms by Chicago artist Melissa Jay Craig. The installation has been shown in a various configurations the last few years, and only once in its entirety at the Morgan Conservatory in Cleveland, Ohio back in 2010. From her statement about the installation:

Fungus is an agent of change. I’m fascinated with its myriad forms, and I love to go in search of it. I can become more excited by discovering a beautiful fungal growth than by perusing artwork ‘discovered’ for us by curators in contemporary museums. When I was a child, the first time I had the intriguing feeling that the planet carried messages (texts, if you will) for those who were curious enough to look, was when I came upon a group of Amanita Muscaria, huddled together in a dark, secret space under tall pines.

You can see more views of these fungal books on her website. (via Green Chair Press)

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Intricate Modular Paper Sculptures by Richard Sweeney

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Inspired by the organic forms of nature like mounds of snow and clouds, English artist Richard Sweeney creates delicate modular sculptures out of paper. It’s hard to believe that some of these 3D sculptures came to life from just from paper, but the Wakefield, England-based artist works primarily with a ruler and cutter to bend fold and glue together his complex sculptures, which range from table-top size to floor-to-ceiling installations. Especially impressive are his pleated sculptures, which often don’t even use glue to achieve their three-dimensional terrain look.

Sweeney is currently part of a touring show titled Above the Fold. And for those lucky folks in the Netherlands, he’ll be showing his work at the CODA Museum in Apeldoorn this summer. (via Cross Connect Magazine)

Update: Along with 2 other artists, Sweeney has just launched a kickstarter campaign to fund an exhibition in New York.

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