Category: Art

Shadow Knives: Silhouette Artwork Cut from Butcher Knives by Li Hongbo

Shadow Knives: Silhouette Artwork Cut from Butcher Knives by Li Hongbo silhouettes sculpture knives food
Cheetah, Metal, 35 x 9.8 x 1.7 cm, 2014

Shadow Knives: Silhouette Artwork Cut from Butcher Knives by Li Hongbo silhouettes sculpture knives food
Wasteland, Metal, 35 x 9.8 x 1.7 cm, 2014

Shadow Knives: Silhouette Artwork Cut from Butcher Knives by Li Hongbo silhouettes sculpture knives food
Gaze, Metal, 35 x 9.8 x 1.7 cm, 2014

Shadow Knives: Silhouette Artwork Cut from Butcher Knives by Li Hongbo silhouettes sculpture knives food
Hawk, Metal, 35 x 9.8 x 1.7 cm, 2014

Shadow Knives: Silhouette Artwork Cut from Butcher Knives by Li Hongbo silhouettes sculpture knives food Hunting, Metal, 35 x 9.8 x 1.7 cm, 2014

Shadow Knives: Silhouette Artwork Cut from Butcher Knives by Li Hongbo silhouettes sculpture knives food
Lotus Pond, Metal, 35 x 9.8 x 1.7 cm, 2014

Shadow Knives: Silhouette Artwork Cut from Butcher Knives by Li Hongbo silhouettes sculpture knives food
Bones of a Snake, Metal, 200 x 38 x 9 cm, 2014

Artist Li Hongbo, whose flexible paper sculptures we’ve admired many times here on Colossal, recently created a new series of silhouette artworks as part of a solo show at Contemporary by Angela Li in Hong Kong. Each piece is delicately cut from the knife leaving a complementary negative space from which it appears to rise. Hongbo says the pieces are meant as a warning, that “human beings will eventually destroy themselves because of their gluttony and their abuse of animals.” You can see more from the series here. If you liked this technique, also check out paper sculptures by Peter Callesen. (via My Amp Goes to 11)

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Heirloom: A Tablecloth Created with Lace-like Patterns of Collected Seeds by Rena Detrixhe

Heirloom: A Tablecloth Created with Lace like Patterns of Collected Seeds by Rena Detrixhe table seeds sculpture multiples lace furniture

Heirloom: A Tablecloth Created with Lace like Patterns of Collected Seeds by Rena Detrixhe table seeds sculpture multiples lace furniture

Heirloom: A Tablecloth Created with Lace like Patterns of Collected Seeds by Rena Detrixhe table seeds sculpture multiples lace furniture

Heirloom is a 2013 installation by artist Rena Detrixhe created from thousands of collected seeds that were applied in lace-like patterns to a large piece of sheer fabric. The resulting tablecloth makes it appear as if the seeds are hovering just above the surface. You can see much more of her environmental and textile-based artwork here.

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Old Paintbrush Handles Sculpted Into Heads of Women by Rebecca Szeto

Old Paintbrush Handles Sculpted Into Heads of Women by Rebecca Szeto sculpture paint

“2 1/2″ (2010). Oil on Carved Paintbrush.

Old Paintbrush Handles Sculpted Into Heads of Women by Rebecca Szeto sculpture paint

“The World Is Your Oyster” (2013). Oil on Carved Paintbrush

Old Paintbrush Handles Sculpted Into Heads of Women by Rebecca Szeto sculpture paint

“Reflections on Beauty” (2010). Mirror, Oil on Carved Paintbrush (Installation).

Old Paintbrush Handles Sculpted Into Heads of Women by Rebecca Szeto sculpture paint

Geisha (2010). Oil on Carved Paintbrush.

Old Paintbrush Handles Sculpted Into Heads of Women by Rebecca Szeto sculpture paint

“Doña Hongari (after Velazquez)” (2011). Oil on carved paintbrush.

Old Paintbrush Handles Sculpted Into Heads of Women by Rebecca Szeto sculpture paint

“Untitled (Blue)” (2013). Oil, Acrylic on Carved Paintbrush.

In a poetic twist of fate, end-of-life paintbrushes are whittled down and sculpted into artwork by San Francisco-based artist Rebecca Szeto. Tools that were once used to create artwork, now bear the face of female portraits largely inspired by women of the Renaissance period and other female figures of art history. Szeto, who previously worked as a faux finisher, uses her skill and background to create playful objects that question our notions of beauty and value; trash and treasure. “The slow and repetitive nature of whittling becomes a meditative activity,” says Szeto, referring to her ongoing series of Paintbrush Portraits. For Szeto, the build-up of paint layers helps define their ultimate form as she reflects “on the idiosyncrasies of each individual brush.” (Via Lustik)

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Mechanical Drawings and the Human Form Merge in Oil Paintings by Atsushi Koyama

Mechanical Drawings and the Human Form Merge in Oil Paintings by Atsushi Koyama painting infographics anatomy

Mechanical Drawings and the Human Form Merge in Oil Paintings by Atsushi Koyama painting infographics anatomy

Mechanical Drawings and the Human Form Merge in Oil Paintings by Atsushi Koyama painting infographics anatomy

Mechanical Drawings and the Human Form Merge in Oil Paintings by Atsushi Koyama painting infographics anatomy

Mechanical Drawings and the Human Form Merge in Oil Paintings by Atsushi Koyama painting infographics anatomy

Mechanical Drawings and the Human Form Merge in Oil Paintings by Atsushi Koyama painting infographics anatomy

Although the meaning behind these oil paintings by Atsushi Koyama is somewhat ambiguous, it’s easy to appreciate the exactness of his paintbrush that colorfully and elegantly depicts mechanical diagrams mixed with anatomical illustrations. Born in Tokyo, Koyama holds both a BFA in art from Tama Art University and a Bachelor’s degree in mathematics from Tokyo University of Science, so it’s no surprise to see a confluence of both backgrounds in his artwork. You can see more paintings from the last few years over at Frantic Gallery. (via Dark Silence in Suburbia, Hayden’s Magazine)

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Mona Caron’s Murals of Weeds Slowly Overtake Walls and Buildings

Mona Carons Murals of Weeds Slowly Overtake Walls and Buildings street art plants murals flowers

Mona Carons Murals of Weeds Slowly Overtake Walls and Buildings street art plants murals flowers

Mona Carons Murals of Weeds Slowly Overtake Walls and Buildings street art plants murals flowers

Mona Carons Murals of Weeds Slowly Overtake Walls and Buildings street art plants murals flowers

Mona Carons Murals of Weeds Slowly Overtake Walls and Buildings street art plants murals flowers

Mona Carons Murals of Weeds Slowly Overtake Walls and Buildings street art plants murals flowers

As part of her ongoing Weeds project, artist Mona Caron (previously) has begun photographing the progress of her murals step-by-step, creating short animations of growing plants in public spaces. Caron has recently painted murals of weeds in her native Switzerland, India, and around her current home in San Francisco in what she describes as “a tribute to the resilience of all those beings who no one made room for, were not part of the plan, and yet keep coming back, pushing through and rising up.” Definitely watch the video above to see more of these plants coming to life, and you can learn more here. (via Laughing Squid)

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Mesmerizing Kinetic Sculptures by Bob Potts Mimic Motions of Flight and Fish

Mesmerizing Kinetic Sculptures by Bob Potts Mimic Motions of Flight and Fish sculpture kinetic sculpture
Bot Potts, via M.A.D.Gallery

Working out of his one-man workshop inside a mid-19th century barn, artist Bob Potts (previously) builds wonderous kinetic sculptures that replicate the motions of birds, fish, or other natural motions. The 72-year-old artist utilizes hand-crafted gears, levers, cranks, and chains to create these minimalist pieces that are focused solely on motion rather than ornamentation. Each piece can consume nearly a year’s worth of labor in his upstate New York shop where he works without the aid of computer, instead relying on decades of carpentry and skills learned while collaborating with painter and sculptor George Rhoads.

You can learn much more about his work over at M.A.D.Gallery. The videos above were shot and edited by Bryan Root from Motherlode Pictures.

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Swirling Photographs of Mixed Paint by Mark Lovejoy

Swirling Photographs of Mixed Paint by Mark Lovejoy psychedelic paint color abstract

Working from his studio in Alpine, Texas, artist Mark Lovejoy creates richly textured images of mixed paint, but although he’s somewhat secretive about his process, one thing is clear: they aren’t just photographs of mixed paint. The act of creating the color formations alone sounds more like an act of chemistry than art as he mixes resins, oils, diluents, waxes, and drying agents to create the gloppy textures you see here. Portions are then photographed, reworked, and reshot. In the end, we’re left staring at beautifully colorful images that exist somewhere between salt water taffy, Jackson Pollock paintings, and an alluring industrial accident. Whatever they are, Lovejoy is extremely proficient, cranking out several images each day which he shares on his website. Prints are available of every image. (via It’s Nice That)

Swirling Photographs of Mixed Paint by Mark Lovejoy psychedelic paint color abstract

Swirling Photographs of Mixed Paint by Mark Lovejoy psychedelic paint color abstract

Swirling Photographs of Mixed Paint by Mark Lovejoy psychedelic paint color abstract

Swirling Photographs of Mixed Paint by Mark Lovejoy psychedelic paint color abstract

Swirling Photographs of Mixed Paint by Mark Lovejoy psychedelic paint color abstract

Swirling Photographs of Mixed Paint by Mark Lovejoy psychedelic paint color abstract

Swirling Photographs of Mixed Paint by Mark Lovejoy psychedelic paint color abstract

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