Category: Art

Ellie Davies Creates Forest Landscapes Illuminated with Fields of Stars and Smoke

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Ellie Davies' studio is the forest, creating magical, fairytale-like stills throughout the UK. Davies has been exploring this terrain for the past seven years, attempting to uncover the complex interrelationships between landscape and the individual.

Davies creates both temporary and non-invasive interventions within each forested scene. By incorporating pools of light, smoke, and craft materials she places the viewer in the liminal space between reality and fantasy, a re-exploration of the natural world around us. In her series Stars, the artist overlays her own photography with stars plucked from imagery taken by the Hubble space telescope. These mystical images are created in order to encourage pause, and provoke thoughts about how landscapes influences our identity.

Davies lives in London and received her MA in Photography from London College of Communications in 2008. She is represented by several international galleries including A.Galerie in Paris, Crane Kalman BrightonSophie Maree Gallery in The Netherlands, Brucie Collections in Kiev, and Art Gemini, Singapore. Recently Crane Kalman Gallery Brighton took her work to the Photo London Art Fair at Somerset House from May 21st through 24th, 2015. (via Kateoplis, My Modern Met)

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Javier De Riba Spray Paints the Floors of Derelict Buildings With Geometric, Tile-Like Patterns

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Javier de Riba spray paints abandoned buildings, but not in the way you might imagine. Instead of working on the interior or exterior walls of the buildings he finds, de Riba spray paints the floors, mapping out bright geometric patterns both large and small. The patterns de Riba creates look exactly like tiled floors, making it seem like an element of the building’s past has been elegantly restored.

Like a screen printer, de Riba works layer by layer, first painting the entirety of the space he plans to cover, then working one colored stencil at a time to build up the tile-like effect. The end result is a trick to the eyes both with materials and placement, one never expecting that spray paint formed the intricate patterns on the dusty floors.

The artist and creative designer was born in Barcelona and has worked as an art director in various agencies and studios. His current job is at Reskate Arts & Crafts Collective, a company that develops graphics and communication projects with a focus on sustainability and humane treatment. (via Junk Culture)

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Birds and Fauna Sprout From Nunzio Paci’s New Graphite and Oil Anatomical Renderings

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Taking the analogy comparing blood vessels and tree branches literally, Nunzio Paci (previously) creates oil and graphite paintings that connect humans back to nature. Paci’s works look almost straight from a medical textbook except for one flaw—the trees and animals that sprout from his subjects’ mouths, chests, and necks. Paci ultimately takes a painterly approach to his works, paint dripping down the canvas to add balance to his extreme detail.

Paci’s practice centers on the relationship between man and nature, especially focusing on the visual overlap of our intrinsic and extrinsic systems. The beautiful and minimally colored works could be interpreted as extremely morbid—Paci showing us our ultimate fate when nature takes over.

Paci lives and works in Italy. His last exhibition was titled In the Garden of Idne at Oxholm Gallery in Copenhagen this past January.

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Louise Zhang’s Abstract Vials Filled With Playfully Grotesque Neon Blobs

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SLOSH SAMPLES #1 2014 flubber, pva glue, acrylic, oil paint, resin plastics, polymer balls, polymer clay, pigment, water, varnish, 100ml serum vials, all photos by docQment

Louise Zhang's Slosh Samples look like floating paintings, three-dimensional depictions of 2D abstract work. The bottles contain brightly colored fluids that separate and congeal, containing everything from polymer clay to flubber. At first one is delighted by the bubblegum colors that fill the vessels, yet after a quick inspection the grotesque nature of what lurks inside is easily revealed.

Both Zhang’s sculptures and paintings happily represent blob-like forms and revolting textures. The work seems excited to repel its audience after it has seduced them with its saturated neon hues, a palette that could be described as cute or playful. Zhang’s website compares her playful works to childhood cartoons like Spongebob Squarepants or Ren and Stimpy—television shows that invite our minds to interact with slime, slop, and snot.

Zhang is a Sydney-based artist currently working on her MFA at UNSW Art & Design and partaking in a residency with Throwdown Press. The artist’s first solo exhibition Plomp was held at Artereal Gallery in 2014. Zhang has described her work as “evocative of confectionery—the gooey, the sticky, and the sensation of sweets melting,” which brings to mind the sweet and sugary installations of Pip & Pop. (via Zannaka)

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SLOSH SAMPLES #2 2014 flubber, pva glue, acrylic, oil paint, resin plastics, polymer balls, polymer clay, pigment, water, varnish, 100ml serum vials

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SLOSH SAMPLES #2 (details) 2014

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Lisbon is Subverting Street Art Cliches Through Creative Workshops for Older People

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LATA 65 is connecting art between generational divides, matching older citizens of Lisbon with a relatively young form of art—graffiti (“lata” means “can” in Portuguese). Through workshops attendees learn the history of street art while making their own stencils and tags, ultimately incorporating their work in murals across the city. These bright colors go into run-down parts of the Lisbon, and each new artist is aided by the help of well-known street artists.

The goal of LATA 65 is to eliminate the many cliches that come with street art by widening both its audience and participants. Through introducing the art of graffiti to a different group of makers, the project hopes to create a solidarity between all groups involved while adding some colorful designs to the city along the way. (via mashkulture, Messy Nessy Chic, CollabCubed, and mental_floss)

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Rick Satava’s Luminous Glass Blown Jellyfish Appear Suspended in Motion

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The jellyfish tank is the first environment I always run to when visiting an aquarium. I’m drawn to the luminous quality of the underwater creatures’ bodies, as well as their inclusion in a scene that appears to need no sources of artificial light. Glass artist Rick Satava was also captivated by these creatures in the late 80s, and after a trip to the Monterey Bay Aquarium he began to experiment with sculptures that mimicked the experience of a jellyfish’s elegant glide through the water.

Satava began selling these sculptures in 1990, and by 2002 he was crafting about 300 pieces of work a month. The bright jellyfishes he creates are suspended in the glass that surround them, yet each still appears as if their tentacles are rippling through the water. The glass blown approach works perfectly when translated to the round bell-like shape of the jellyfish’s body, as their natural appearance looks like brightly blown glass.

The California-based artist uses a technique in his sculptures called “glass-in-glass,” which consists of a glass sculpture being dipped into a second, molten glass layer. You can find Sativa’s sculptures within dozens of galleries nationally as well as a few locations internationally including Japan, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland. (via My Modern Met)

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An Interactive ‘Fur’ Mirror by Daniel Rozin

As part of an exhibition of new artworks at bitforms in New York, artist Daniel Rozin (previously) designed the PomPom Mirror. The device relies on motion sensors and 928 faux fur pom poms manipulated by 464 motors to create a mirror reflection of the viewer in real-time. The PomPom mirror is one in a long series of similar interactive installations that utilize motorized arrays of moving objects like wooden pegs, trash, or even folding fans, that generate moving silhouettes in response to movement. Descent With Modification at bitforms runs through July 1, 2015. (via Booooooom)

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