Category: Art

An Architect Maps the Familiar Urban Details of Cities onto Moonlike Globes 

planet-1

As part of his ongoing Globes series, London-based architect Amer TendToTravel sketches the familiar landmarks and textural street patterns of familiar cities onto tiny moon-sized spheres. Seen here are locales like Paris, Hong Kong, and Melbourne whose skyscrapers reach out like tiny spikes atop the Death Star. You can see more of his completed globes and works-in-progress on his website and on Instagram. If you liked this, also check out the work of Ben Sak. (via Colossal Submissions)

planet-2

planet-4

planet-3

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

A New Dancing Light Sculpture by Akinori Goto 

Media artist Akinori Goto (previously) just shared another version of his kinetic light sculpture depicting a series of animated dancing figures. The framework of the sculpture is 3D printed from data of silhouettes traced from an actual dancer, creating a sort of modern-day rotoscoping effect. When illuminated with a bright light, a cross-section of the sculpture is revealed. Goto hopes to soon obtain a patent for the device. (via Prosthetic Knowledge)

dance-1

dance-2

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Rebirth: Artist Manabu Ikeda Unveils a Monumental Pen & Ink Drawing Nearly 3.5 Years in the Making 

Rebirth, 2016. Pen & ink, 13 x 10' (300 x 100cm). Courtesy the Chazen Museum of Art.

Rebirth, 2016. Pen & ink, 13 x 10′ (300 x 100cm). Courtesy the Chazen Museum of Art.

The 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami in Japan was one of the most devastating environmental events of our time, with its overall impact rippling across the globe for years to come. But just as stated in Newton’s third law—for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction—so too did the people of Japan respond to the magnitude of the destruction in an effort to rebuild their country anew as captured in this staggering new artwork by Manabu Ikeda titled Rebirth. Starting in July of 2013, Ikeda toiled away on the 13 x 10 foot piece for 10 hours a day inside a basement studio at the Chazen Museum of Art in Madison, Wisconsin. He finished work just last week.

process-4

Manabu Ikeda at work.

A video posted by Colossal (@colossal) on

At its core, Rebirth depicts a tree rising from the debris of the tsunami as enormous waves crash nearby, but a closer inspection reveals thousands of tiny details, the individual stories of anonymous people, plants, and animals as they fight for survival and try to return their world to a semblance of order. Ikeda says that in his work he seeks to replicate the beautiful chaos of life that rarely fits a simple linear narrative. Instead, everything crashes together and interacts in unknown and unexpected ways, an idea that applies directly to his process as he often doesn’t know what each day will bring as he works inch by inch on the near endless canvas before him.

manabu-final-detail-3

Rebirth, detail.

manabu-final-detail-4

Rebirth, detail.

While Ikeda sketches broad details in pencil on the canvas beforehand, he primarily works with pen and acrylic ink using various forms of cross-hatching and brushwork to fill areas so dense with details, the true nature of the artwork isn’t revealed until staring at it from only a few inches away. Mountains of vehicles, gnarled tree branches, and train tracks sit tangled at the base of a tree, and flower blooms comprised of umbrellas and emergency tents fill the sky above. Everywhere a collision of humankind and nature, for better or worse.

“My goal is to faithfully express my view of the world in my composition, but I don’t intentionally depict detailed images,” he tells the Chazen. “Because I see details when I observe things, rather than the whole, I find pen and ink to be the best tools to express how I see them.”

manabu-final-detail-2

Rebirth, detail.

manabu-final-detail

Rebirth, detail.

Rebirth, detail.

Rebirth, detail.

Rebirth in progress.

Rebirth in progress.

process-1

Rebirth in progress.

Ikeda’s time spent in Madison wasn’t without its own adversity. The artist dislocated a shoulder in a downhill skiing accident which rendered his dominant hand temporarily useless. Unable to stop work for very long, Ikeda began practicing with his other hand and after 3-4 practice drawings continued work on Rebirth unfazed.

Rebirth will be on view only briefly at the Chazen Museum of Art through December 11, 2016. If you’re anywhere near the midwest, this is well worth a trip and I strongly encourage you to stop by. You can explore it for over 30 minutes and still not see everything. You can also read more about it on Wisconsin Life.

process-2

Manabu Ikeda at work, still from Clayton Adams.

process-3

Manabu Ikeda at work, still from Clayton Adams.

test

Ikeda Manabu’s first attempt at drawing with his non-dominant hand after a skiing accident.

Film and stills courtesy Clayton Adams.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , , .

Geometric Light Installations by Nicolas Rivals Bathe the Spanish Countryside in Red 

la-linea-roja-01

As part of his project La Línea Roja, Paris-based photographer Nicolas Rivals constructed bright red light configurations installed outdoors while on a trip through Spain. Each temporary piece was captured in a series of long-exposure shots that reveal an unusual juxtaposition between fabricated objects and the natural world. You can see more from the series on his website and Instagram—and if you liked this also check out James Nizam, Barry Underwood, and this short film from 3hund.

la-linea-roja-03

La Linea Roja

la-linea-roja-06

La Linea Roja

La Linea Roja

la-linea-roja-11

La Linea Roja

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Porcelain Vessels Inspired by the Ocean Sculpted by Jennifer McCurdy 

mccurdy-6

Guided in her ceramics studio by nature’s symmetrical and asymmetrical forms, artist Jennifer McCurdy works with inspiration from everyday objects, producing vessels that imitate natural specimens such as malformed conch shells and burst milkweed pods. Her sculptures are habitually one color, a white the same shade as the ocean’s surf. Keeping a very limited palette allows McCurdy to highlight the hollow areas of her pieces, casting shadows from her chiseled patterns.

“I use a translucent porcelain body because it has a beautiful surface, and it conveys the qualities of light and shadow that I wish to express,” said McCurdy in her artist statement. “After throwing my vessel on the potter’s wheel, I alter the form to set up a movement of soft shadow. When the porcelain is leather hard, I carve patterns to add energy and counterpoint. I fire my work to cone 10, where the porcelain becomes non-porous and translucent.”

McCurdy occasionally adds 23 carat gold leaf detail to the inside of her pieces, allowing them to glow from the inside. You can see more of her ocean-inspired vessels on her website, as well as within the pages of the book The New Age of Ceramics currently available in the Colossal Shop.

mccurdy-7

mccurdy-4

mccurdy-5

mccurdy-8

mccurdy-2

mccurdy-1

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Whimsical Storybook Beasts and Birds Illustrated by Vorja Sánchez 

vorja-1

Barcelona-based illustrator Vorja Sánchez depicts comically surreal storybook creatures that look like a cross between mutant dinosaurs and shadowy demons—but also captures the very lifelike spirit of birds and other animals. Working with a variety of mediums from pen and link to watercolor or spray paint, each piece is inspired by events in his daily life, an observation he makes while walking through the forest, or drawing from a recent stint living in Nicaragua where he organized painting classes for children and adults. Sánchez has just begun working as a full-time artist in the last few months and is currently wrapping up work on an illustrated book. You can follow more of his artwork on Facebook and Instagram.

vorja-1-detail

vorja-2

vorja-3

vorja-8

vorja-4

vorja-5

vorja-6

vorja-7

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Page 1 of 3821234...»