Category: Art

Frames Which Frame Themselves by Taylor Holland 

1800s Empire (2014)

1800s Empire (2014), all images via Taylor Holland

Paris-based American artist Taylor Holland explores how technological methods interact with a physical reality, a concept which is showcased in his series FRA[MES]. Utilizing digital methods copied onto custom molds, Holland fills ornate 18th and 19th with reorganized details from their own design, merging the style of art and frame.

Fra[mes] is a collaboration between algorithm, artist, and master craftsman, which not only bridges the gap between digital media and old-world craftsmanship, but gives the computer an equal hand in the creative process,” says Holland in an artist statement on his website.

The series is ongoing, with a previous iteration utilizing frames from the Louvre. You can view more from Holland on his Instagram and Tumblr. (via Colossal Submissions)

German Neo-Rococo Naturalistic Style (1840-1850) (2014)

German Neo-Rococo Naturalistic Style (1840-1850) (2014)

Louis XV Frisbee (2013)

Louis XV Frisbee (2013)

1840 French Neo-Rococo (2013)

1840 French Neo-Rococo (2013)

1810 Empire (2013)

1810 Empire (2013)

1840s German Neo-Rococo (2012)

1840s German Neo-Rococo (2012)

1820 Late Empire (2016)

1820 Late Empire (2016)

1750 Dutch Louis XV (2016)

1750 Dutch Louis XV (2016)

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Pixelated Wood Sculptures Carved by Hsu Tung Han 

In a clash of digital and analogue, artist Hsu Tung Han carves figurative sculptures from wood that appear to be dissolving into fields of pixels. The Taiwanese artist views the carved figures of men and women as puzzles, planning for each configuration through a series of drawings and clay models. Han then produces the final work from segments of walnut, teak, or African wax wood, carving cubed pieces from the sculptures to give the illusion of suspended levitation or a paused transformation. You can see more of Han’s pixelated wood works on his Flickr. (via Fubiz)

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Experimental Cutlery That Challenges Traditional Ideas of Usability 

Design by Maki Okamoto. All images via Steinbeisser.

Merging design and haute cuisine, Amsterdam-based company Steinbeisser collaborates with designers and artists to produce surreal cutlery that operate beyond traditional ideas of usability for their online store Jouw… (Dutch for “your”). The tableware doesn’t necessarily make the experience of eating easier, but rather encourages the user to reconsider their relationship to utensils and how they are used.

“Yet it is not only about beauty, we also believe in sustainability,” explain co-creators Jouw Wijnsma and Martin Kullik on Jouw…’s website. “That’s why all the pieces are crafted only from natural materials, such as wood, calabash, stone, clay and glass. Often sourced locally and using materials that are found, recycled and/or reused. Even the smaller parts of the pieces such as glue, paint and glazing, are organic and biodegradable.”

One artist that incorporates reused materials is Swedish artist Maki Okamoto who works which antique silver nickel cutlery which she inherited from her husband’s grandmother. You can see more examples of experimental cutlery by more than 20 artists on Jouw…'s website and Instagram.

Design by Joo Hyung Park.

Design by Nils Hint.

Design by Maki Okamoto.

Design by Maki Okamoto.

Design by Nils Hint.

Design by Nils Hint.

Design by Nils Hint.

Design by Maki Okamoto.

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An Immersive Forest of 60,000 Rainbow Numbers by Emmanuelle Moureaux 

In celebration of The National Art Center of Tokyo‘s 10th anniversary, French architect Emmanuelle Moureaux was commissioned to fill the institution’s 6500 square foot exhibition space with her vision of the decade to come. Unsurprisingly, Moureaux, whose practice often involves layering color within space, decided to transform the white cube into a rainbow forest filled with more than 60,000 multi-colored numbers arranged in three dimensional grids.

The installation, Forest of Numbers, is composed of 10 layers, each to represent the next 10 years. Figures 0 through 9 create the 4 digits needed for each year. The numbers are also divided into 100 shades to align with Moureaux’s 100 Colors installation series which she has installed around the world since 2013. You can see previous installations from this series on her website. (via My Modern Met)

  

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Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood Reflect Light in a Rainbow of Color 

Cambridge-based artist Chris Wood (previously) continues to produce stunning light sculptures utilizing panels of dichroic glass that refract light in a vivid array of color. Her works have appeared in numerous exhibitions over the last few years and have even been incorporated into nearly a dozen displays worldwide for Fendi Fashion House. Wood has also created installations using glasses and lights that reflect patterns onto nearby surfaces. Seen here are several pieces from shows at the Shanghai Museum of Glass and the China Art Museum, you can see more recent work on her website.

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