Category: Art

Artists Ella & Pitr Paint 21,000 Meter Rooftop Mural in Norway

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Ahead of the 15th annual NuArt street art festival opening this weekend in Norway, French artists Ella & Pitr completed work on this absolutely enormous mural on the rooftop of the Block Berge Bygg construction company located in the municipality of Klepp in Rogaland county. The piece is titled “Lilith and Olaf” and depicts a curled up girl with painted toenails dropping a small king from her hand. The work is a tongue-in-cheek depiction of King Olaf I of Norway whose birthplace is just meters from the mural.

The 21,000 square meter artwork required an army of volunteers to paint and according to NuArt’s general manager, James Finucane, it is most likely the “the world’s largest outdoor mural.” Over at Brooklyn Street Art they add the qualifier that it is most likely the “the world’s largest figurative mural.” The artwork is also strategically placed on the flight path to the nearby Sola airport where it can clearly be viewed from above.

Ella & Pitr are known for their ambitiously large mural projects in a similar illustrative style, more of which you can see here. The NuArt festival runs through October 11, 2015. (via Huffington Post, Designboom)

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Japanese Artist Places a Modern Spin on Centuries-Old Woodblock Prints Through Animated GIFs

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A Japanese artist is placing a modern spin on a centuries-old technique, animating Japanese woodblock prints in the style typically reserved for TV show recaps and continuously looping memes. The artist, who who goes by Segawa thirty-seven, uses Adobe Photoshop and After Effects to alter the static images and inlay elements of sci-fi and modern culture—bringing in Segways and alien spaceships into the fixed landscapes-turned-gifs.

Other gifs produced by the artist are far more subtle, one in particular showing a crowded street of people lit by moonlight, their shadows traveling from the right to the left side of the screen as the moon travels through the sky. Another shows a scene of people gazing out the window as a high speed train endlessly rushes by.

You can see more of Segawa thirty-seven’s woodblock print animations on his Twitter(via Spoon & Tamago

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Delicate Layered Paper Sculptures of Birds and Other Animals by Calvin Nicholls

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Straddling a line between 2D and 3D, paper artist Calvin Nicholls forms carefully cut and layered paper sculptures of animals that seem to break free from the surrounding matboard and hover just above the surface. To achieve the haut-relief effect (a process he shares online), Nicholls first works from a drawing which he uses as a template for the various paper components. Using an X-ACTO knife, scalpels, and scissors he then carefully cuts pieces of paper and glues them in place. Each piece can take anywhere from a few weeks up to two years depending on scale and complexity.

Nicholls recently sculpted five birds of paradise as part of a private commission that are currently on view at the Society of Animal Artists annual ‘Art and the Animal’ show at the Roger Tory Peterson Institute in Jamestown, NY. The pieces won both an Award of Excellence and the “Artists’ Choice” awards. You can also keep an eye out for his work at the Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum later this month for the Birds in Art exhibition.

Seen here is a collection of artworks from the last year or so, but you can explore hundreds of additional pieces on his website and Facebook.

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A Cloud of 100,000 Illuminated Balloons Suspended Inside Covent Garden by Charles Pétillion

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French artist and photographer Charles Pétillion has just unveiled a cumulus cloud composed of 100,000 white balloons illuminated from the inside at London’s Covent Garden. Titled ‘Heartbeat,’ the installation was created as part of the upcoming London Design Festival and stretches the length of the South Hall ceiling of the Market Building. Pétillion is known for his use of white balloons to fill unusual spaces, a photographic series he refers to as Invasions. This is by far his largest installation to date and his first public art piece. He shares about Heartbeat:

The balloon invasions I create are metaphors. Their goal is to change the way in which we see the things we live alongside each day without really noticing them. With Heartbeat I wanted to represent the Market Building as the beating heart of this area – connecting its past with the present day to allow visitors to re-examine its role at the heart of London’s life.

Each balloon has its own dimensions and yet is part of a giant but fragile composition that creates a floating cloud above the energy of the market below. This fragility is represented by contrasting materials and also the whiteness of the balloons that move and pulse appearing as alive and vibrant as the area itself.

The installation will be on view through September 27, 2015, and you can watch a timelapse video of its construction and an interview with Pétillion below. (via Designboom)

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Ceramic Sculptures That Unravel Before Your Eyes

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Ceramicist Haejin Lee creates sculptures that seem to unravel before your eyes, ceramic forms that open and splay outwards to make vessels unusable and faces far more interesting. Utilizing minimal color Lee instead focuses on her shapeshifting creations, often incorporating human elements like eyes and mouths that sprout from the banded chaos.

The South Korean artist worked in her native country for 10 years before moving to Vancouver, BC two years ago. She is a graduate of Hong-Ik University in Korea, where she received a masters degree in ceramic art. Her studio in Vancouver focuses on functional tableware designs that are modern and simple, balancing her more abstractly formed works. You can see more of her tableware line and other works from her Canadian studio on her Instagram. (via Cross Connect Magazine)

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Glass Cross Sections of Fruit and Other Foods by Elliot Walker

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London-based artist Elliot Walker uses molten glass to create a stunning variety sculptures including these arrangements of eating utensils, vessels, and cross sections of food. The stark outer surfaces of the surrounding objects contrasts with the vibrant interiors of the edible pieces, not unlike the effect of a cut geode. Walker currently has work at the Peter Layton Glass Blowing Studio as part of their current exhibition titled Essence that runs through the end of the week. You can see more photos of his work on Facebook.

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Miniature Skulls Carved from Pearls Used to Create Anatomical Jewelry

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Producing work since 1974, Japanese artist and jeweler Shinji Nakaba infuses all matter of anatomical forms, skulls, and flowers into what he describes as “wearable sculptures.” The pieces come in all shapes and sizes, but his most prolific series involves human and animal skulls carved from oyster pearls and attached to rings, necklaces, and brooches. In addition to selling pieces through his online shop, Nakaba’s work has been shown at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts and the Museum of Arts & Design in New York, as well as several galleries and museums around Japan. You can see more of his jewelry designs and pearl carvings on his website. (via Colossal Submissions)

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