Category: Art

Wire Mesh Figures of Children Appear to Dissolve into Thin Air 

Norwegian artist Lene Kilde seeks inspiration in the emotions of children, deftly capturing brief moments in their lives distilled into minimalistic wire mesh sculptures. The pieces focus almost entirely on the hands and feet of her subjects that dissolve into nothingness as they go about various activities. This is not to suggest anything is inherently missing, but rather to invite the viewer to complete the rest of each sculpture in their mind, perhaps substituting the missing fragments with their own memories or stories.

Kilde completed a masters degree in product design in 2012 and was subsequently awarded a three-year work scholarship from the Norwegian Arts Council. She is currently represented by Galleri Ramfjord where you can find more of her figurative sculptures.

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Street Kintsugi: Artist Rachel Sussman Repairs the Roads with Gold 

“Study for Sidewalk Kintsukuroi #01 (New Haven, Connecticut),” photograph with enamel paint and metallic dust.

As part of an ongoing series titled Sidewalk Kintsukuroi, artist Rachel Sussman (previously) brings the Japanese art of kintsugi to the streets. We’ve long been enamored by the ancient technique that traditionally involves the process of fixing broken pottery with a lacquer dusted or mixed with powdered gold, resulting in an a repair that pays homage to the object’s history. In the same way, Sussman’s kintsugi series highlights the history under our feet, bringing attention to the imperceptible changes that take place over time in the world around us. Though even the repairs are impermanent and will eventually be lost to wear and tear.

Several photos from Sidewalk Kintsukuroi are currently on view as part of the Alchemy: Transformations in Gold at the Des Moines Art Center through through May 5, 2017. (via Hyperallergic)

“Study for Sidewalk Kintsukuroi #09 (SoHo, New York),” photograph with enamel paint and metallic dust.

“Study for Sidewalk Kintsukuroi #02 (MASS MoCA),” photograph with enamel paint and metallic dust

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A Homemade Multipoint Pinhole Camera Made from 32,000 Drinking Straws 

Using 32,000 black drinking straws, collaborators Michael (Mick) Farrell and Cliff Haynes created the Straw Camera, a homemade camera they began experimenting with in 2007. Despite the connection one might draw to a pinhole camera, the Straw Camera actually functions quite differently, producing a multipoint perspective from an array rather than a single point perspective.

The direct analogue process records the light collected from each straw onto a piece of paper secured to the back of the camera. The camera gives a direct 1:1 view of the subject that is placed before it, however it translates the image to one that mirrors that of pointillist painting, breaking the subject into thousands of little dots.

“In a world beset by selfies with their immediate gratification, and HD television in all its glory feeding our visual appetite, a Straw Camera image of an individual, with its engineering projection and disappearance of the subject into the near fog of visual capture, gives the viewer a glimpse of just how transitory perception is,” said Cliff about the camera.

To read more about the project, check out the photography duo’s website for the Straw Camera, or their book which was published earlier this month. (via PetaPixel)

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Frames Which Frame Themselves by Taylor Holland 

1800s Empire (2014)

1800s Empire (2014), all images via Taylor Holland

Paris-based American artist Taylor Holland explores how technological methods interact with a physical reality, a concept which is showcased in his series FRA[MES]. Utilizing digital methods copied onto custom molds, Holland fills ornate 18th and 19th with reorganized details from their own design, merging the style of art and frame.

Fra[mes] is a collaboration between algorithm, artist, and master craftsman, which not only bridges the gap between digital media and old-world craftsmanship, but gives the computer an equal hand in the creative process,” says Holland in an artist statement on his website.

The series is ongoing, with a previous iteration utilizing frames from the Louvre. You can view more from Holland on his Instagram and Tumblr. (via Colossal Submissions)

German Neo-Rococo Naturalistic Style (1840-1850) (2014)

German Neo-Rococo Naturalistic Style (1840-1850) (2014)

Louis XV Frisbee (2013)

Louis XV Frisbee (2013)

1840 French Neo-Rococo (2013)

1840 French Neo-Rococo (2013)

1810 Empire (2013)

1810 Empire (2013)

1840s German Neo-Rococo (2012)

1840s German Neo-Rococo (2012)

1820 Late Empire (2016)

1820 Late Empire (2016)

1750 Dutch Louis XV (2016)

1750 Dutch Louis XV (2016)

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Pixelated Wood Sculptures Carved by Hsu Tung Han 

In a clash of digital and analogue, artist Hsu Tung Han carves figurative sculptures from wood that appear to be dissolving into fields of pixels. The Taiwanese artist views the carved figures of men and women as puzzles, planning for each configuration through a series of drawings and clay models. Han then produces the final work from segments of walnut, teak, or African wax wood, carving cubed pieces from the sculptures to give the illusion of suspended levitation or a paused transformation. You can see more of Han’s pixelated wood works on his Flickr. (via Fubiz)

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Experimental Cutlery That Challenges Traditional Ideas of Usability 

Design by Maki Okamoto. All images via Steinbeisser.

Merging design and haute cuisine, Amsterdam-based company Steinbeisser collaborates with designers and artists to produce surreal cutlery that operate beyond traditional ideas of usability for their online store Jouw… (Dutch for “your”). The tableware doesn’t necessarily make the experience of eating easier, but rather encourages the user to reconsider their relationship to utensils and how they are used.

“Yet it is not only about beauty, we also believe in sustainability,” explain co-creators Jouw Wijnsma and Martin Kullik on Jouw…’s website. “That’s why all the pieces are crafted only from natural materials, such as wood, calabash, stone, clay and glass. Often sourced locally and using materials that are found, recycled and/or reused. Even the smaller parts of the pieces such as glue, paint and glazing, are organic and biodegradable.”

One artist that incorporates reused materials is Swedish artist Maki Okamoto who works which antique silver nickel cutlery which she inherited from her husband’s grandmother. You can see more examples of experimental cutlery by more than 20 artists on Jouw…'s website and Instagram.

Design by Joo Hyung Park.

Design by Nils Hint.

Design by Maki Okamoto.

Design by Maki Okamoto.

Design by Nils Hint.

Design by Nils Hint.

Design by Nils Hint.

Design by Maki Okamoto.

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