Category: Art

New Laser-Cut Wood Relief Sculptures by Gabriel Schama 

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Oakland-based artist Gabriel Schama (previously) continues to produce intricate relief sculptures by layering pieces of laser-cut mahogany plywood. Some of his most impressive new works see mandala-like shapes contained within the silhouettes of people’s faces, a striking idea that imbues each portrait with an unusual sense of motion and personality. Other pieces seem to utilize religious iconography or patterns from nature like reptile scales or leaves. Schama is soon to release a new collection of work for sale and you can learn more via his website.

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Artist Loris Cecchini Turns Gallery Walls into Vibrating Pools of Liquid 

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In his ongoing series of relief sculptures titled “Wallwave Vibrations,” artist Loris Cecchini appears to liquify the walls of art galleries by turning them into pools of undulating waves caused by sound. Each piece is first digitally produced and then fabricated with polyester resin before being seamlessly applied to a flat surface. He remarks about the pieces:

In my most recent sculptures, the ‘Wallwave Vibrations’ series, one loses the element of the object proper. The concern for alteration is concerned more particularly with the physical manifestation of the vibrations, expressed each time with different frequencies and intensities, wherein the visual pattern becomes “echo” of a phenomenon like a succession of waves on a liquid surface. In this direction it is as if the architecture, or a portion of it, is modified by the relationship between the sculpture and the wall.

You can see much more of Cecchini’s organic and environment-influenced sculptures and installations on his website. (via Synaptic Stimuli, Juxtapoz)

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Street Artist Paints Over Ugly Graffiti to Make it Legible 

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Artist Mathieu Tremblin recently took to the streets of France on a rather quixotic mission to improve the legibility of ugly graffiti. Mimicking the scale, color, and layering of each tag, Tremblin created his own replica in a perfectly crisp font. It’s hard to say if either version is more aesthetically pleasing, but he definitely gets an ‘A’ for effort. (via Design You Trust, thnx Nikki!)

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Miniature Graphite Drawings by Mateo Pizarro 

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Mateo Pizarro’s tiny graphite drawings are scarcely larger than the length of a match but contain enough detail to suggest entire stories, both surreal and terrifying. The Colombian artist refers to these as his Micro-Barroque series, and while the images shown here seem focused on the incredible detail contained in small spaces, Pizarro also explores more macabre and unsettling images in a collection of hybrid creatures titled Bestiary of Improbable Animals. You can see more of Pizarro’s work on Instagram and Behance. (via Juxtapoz)

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Imaginary Currency Leaf Insects and Other Fictional Bugs Painted by Takumi Kama 

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To avoid becoming prey, leaf insects use mimicry to blend into their surroundings. But in Takumi Kama’s imagined future, when the insect’s natural environment has been completely destroyed, these masters of camouflage will have no choice but to move in with those who took away their home.

Animals and insects are no stranger in the work of Japanese painter Takumi Kama, who recreates them in acrylics with astonishing accuracy and realism. For a recent exhibition at BAMI gallery in Kyoto, Kama came up with 2 different, imaginary leaf insects that camouflage themselves in the city. One is the Hide-mushi, which gets its name from Hideo Noguchi, who appears on the 1000 yen bill (mushi means insect). The Hide-mushi camouflages itself amongst Japanese currency and feeds on paper, which can affect its color.

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Then there is the Comi-mushi, which camouflages itself amongst comic books and comic strips. It can often be spotted in bookstores, convenience stores but have also been known to come out on days when garbage trucks pick up paper for recycling.

Kama has painted these imaginary insects with such realism that it can be hard to tell if they’re 2 or 3-dimensional. But rest assured, no currency has been defaced in the name of art. Everything from the insects to the specimen boxes have been painted on canvas. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

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Surreal Views of the Marqueyssac Topiary Gardens Photographed by Philippe Jarrigeon 

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All photography by Philippe Jarrigeon for PIN–UP.

For the latest issues of PIN-UP, photographer Philippe Jarrigeon visited the Château de Marqueyssac in France to photograph the incredible topiary gardens found there. The area was first developed in the late 17th century by Bertrand Vernet de Marqueyssac, but truly began to take form in the 1860s when owner Julien de Cervel planted thousands of malleable boxwood trees which were carved into fantastic shapes. Today the sprawling gardens have over 150,000 trees cut into unusual geometric forms that can be explored by the public through 5 kilometers of walkable paths. You can see more photos by Jarrigeon over on PIN-UP. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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