Category: Art

Interactive Mirrors Built from Arrays of Moving Objects by Daniel Rozin 

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Weave Mirror, 2007. 768 laminated C-ring prints, motors, control electronics, custom software, microcontroller. 57 x 76 x 8” / 148 x 193 x 20 cm. Photo courtesy bitforms gallery.

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Weave Mirror, 2007. 768 laminated C-ring prints, motors, control electronics, custom software, microcontroller. 57 x 76 x 8” / 148 x 193 x 20 cm. Photo courtesy bitforms gallery.

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Angles Mirror, 2013. 465 plastic spokes, motors, video camera, control electronics, custom software, microcontroller,
steel armature. 7.7 x 7 x 3 ft / 2.35 x 2.13 x .93 m. Photo courtesy bitforms gallery.

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Trash Mirror No. 3, 2001-2011. 500 discarded objects, motors, video camera, wood, control electronics, custom software.
76 x 76 x 6″ / 193 x 193 x 15.2 cm. Photo courtesy bitforms gallery nyc and ITP – NYU.

New York-based artist Daniel Rozin creates amazing installations and sculptures that have the ability respond to the presence of a viewer. Among his best known works are an ongoing series of interactive mirrors built from complex arrays of moving objects including wooden pegs, circular bands of laminated rings, plastic spokes and even pieces of discarded trash. Using custom software and video sensors Rozin has the sculptures react in real-time to create a live visual representation of a viewer’s likeness. Via bitforms gallery:

Merging the geometric with the participatory, Rozin’s installations have long been celebrated for their kinetic and interactive properties. Grounded in gestures of the body, the mirror is a central theme of Rozin’s practice. In his art, surface transformation becomes a means to explore animated behavior, representation, and illusion.

Since the late 1990s, his constructions have also investigated the psychological and optical cues inherent to image building, such as pattern and the materiality of the picture plane. Often the grid is carefully controlled with a computer and custom software. Visual structures such as that of haystacks, woven fabric, stone mosaics, the pixel, and particulate accumulations are among the many influences and diverse textures evoked by his installations.

This fall Rozin will unveil a new installation commissioned for the Taiwan Taoyuan international airport, and his most recent solo exhibition, Angles, was held at bitforms gallery last year. All photo and video courtesy bitforms gallery. (via Hi-Fructose)

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New Geometric Sandcastles from Calvin Seibert 

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New York-based sandcastle artist Calvin Seibert (previously) just returned from a 10-day trip to Hawaii where he completed a number of his abstract, geometric sandcastles. For the past 30 years Seibert has worked as a sculptor’s assistant and puts some of his acquired skills in construction and basic carpentry to use while executing these perfect, angular sand structures. You can see more of his recent work here.

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A 19th Century Lithographer Transforms the Alphabet into a Series of Sweeping Landscapes 

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Buried in the archives of the British Museum is this wonderful series of lithographs from illustrator Charles Joseph Hullmandel that transforms the English alphabet into sweeping landscapes. Hullmandel was one of the most important figures in the advancement of British lithography in the first half of the 19th century. These particular pieces were produced sometime between 1818 and 1860 and you can see the full collection here. (via Juxtapoz)

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A Massive Inflatable String Jungle Gym by Numen/For Use 

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Created by Croatian-Austrian collective Numen/For Use, String Prototype is a design for an inflatable volume containing a network of cables that can be explored similar to a jungle gym. The design group is known for their large-scale interactive environments made from tape and netting and this is their first foray into what they call “large geometric inflated objects.” Via the project site:

When the volume deflates, the ropes get loose and lay on the ground enabling compression of the installation. When the object inflates, the ropes tense to a perfect line again, strained enough to carry the weight of a human being. Bodies entrapped in 3D grid, flying in unnatural positions throughout superficial white space, resemble Dadaist collages. Impossibility of perception of scale and direction results in simultaneous feeling of immenseness and absence of space.

The project is currently in development and you can see much more of it here. (via Designboom)

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Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins 

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Using dismembered plastic parts from old dolls and other toys, artist Freya Jobbins assembles these exceedingly strange portraits of people and pop culture icons. Chances are when viewing these you fall firmly into one of two camps: the highly amused or the highly disturbed. Regardless, it’s hard to deny the incredible amount of labor that goes into each piece, from the exploration of form and the use of color to make each anatomical amalgamation.

Born in Johannesburg, South Africa and raised in West Sydney, Jobbins is influenced in part by Guiseppe Archimboldo’s fruit and vegetable paintings as well as Ron Mueck’s oversized humans. You can see more freaky faces over in Jobbin’s online gallery and on Facebook. (via Juxtapoz, FastCo)

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900-Year-Old Coded Viking Message Carved on Wood Fragment Finally Solved, It Says “Kiss Me” [Updated] 

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Photo by Jonas Nordby via forskning.no

For the past several years researchers have been trying to crack a Viking rune alphabet known as Jötunvillur, a perplexing code dating back to the 11th or 12th century that’s been found in some 80 inscriptions including the scratched piece of wood found above. Recently runologist (!) Jonas Nordby from the University of Oslo managed to crack the code and discovered the secret message etched into this particular 900-year-old object reads “Kiss me.” Via Medievalists.net:

For the jötunvillur code, one would replace the original runic character with the last sound of the rune name. For example, the rune for ‘f’, pronounced fe, would be turned into an ‘e’, while the rune for ‘k’, pronounced kaun, became ‘n’.

“It’s like solving a puzzle,” said Nordby to the Norwegian website forskning.no. “Gradually I began to see a pattern in what was apparently meaningless combinations of runes.”

However, those thinking that the coded runes will reveal deep secrets of the Norse will be disappointed. The messages found so far seem to be either used in learning or have a playful tone. In one case the message was ‘Kiss me’. Nordby explains “We have little reason to believe that rune codes should hide sensitive messages, people often wrote short everyday messages.”

The act of coding secret messages appears to have been a leisure activity amongst the Vikings, as some of the other translated inscriptions turned out to be playful taunts at the person doing the decoding. The story was originally reported on forskning.no. (via Erik Kwakkel, Neatorama)

Update: Ida Kvittingen wrote to clarify several aspects of this piece that appears to have been lost in translation from the original article in Forskning.no. Specifically:

The inscription “kiss me” is NOT written using the jötunvillur code. This is a well-known code called cipher runes. Nordby did not crack this code, it was deciphered by others years ago. In my article, it is used as an example of how people often used codes in everyday messages. […] Only 9 of the 80 or so runic writings that Nordby investigated are written using the jötunvillur code.

For further information you can see more the article in an English version on ScienceNordic.

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