Category: Art

The Beetle Sphere: An Actual 1953 VW Beetle Formed into a Perfect Sphere by Ichwan Noor

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See-ming Lee

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This month marked a significant milestone for one of the world’s most famed art fairs as China hosted Art Basel Hong Kong for the first time. With over half of the galleries exhibiting at the fair originating from Asia and Asia-Pacific, Art Basel shined a bright international light on hundreds of artists who were relatively unknown outside of their respective regions.

One such artist was Jakatara-based sculptor Ichwan Noor with Mondecor Jakarta who arrived with this giant sculpture of a 1953 Volkswagen Beetle that, combined with polyester and aluminum, has been morphed into a perfect sphere. Apparently this is one in a series of spherical (and cubical!) vehicles by the artist, but he also works in a variety of other subjects including anatomical forms. To see more coverage of Art Basel Hong Kong, head over to Juxtapoz that has two galleries of photos, Part 1 and Part 2. (via Japan Times, See-ming Lee)

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Wonderful Conceptual Photo-manipulations by 14-Year-Old Photographer “Fiddle Oak”

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Today I discovered a photographer who has a camera named Betsy who tells me he’s been taking photographs for nearly six years. Y’know, since he was 8. I’m referring to Massachusetts-based photographer Fiddle Oak (his real name is Zev) who creates some impressive miniature photo-manipulations that he’s been sharing online with a growing audience for the last few years. Many of the images are a collaboration with Zev’s 18-year-old sister Nellie who helps with concepts and setup but all of the shooting and editing is done by Zev who is also frequently the subject of his own work. Somebody get this kid a scholarship to something. You can find much more of his work over on Flickr. (via david is going to die)

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30 Hour Drawing Time-lapse by Paul White

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I love to watch artists work and this time-lapse video by Australian artist Paul White white is no exception. Filmed by Johnny Blank over 30 hours it captures White working on a pencil drawing of a single wrecked vehicle, a theme of transportation meets decay that plays a prominent role in much of his artwork. The video was shown as part of a recent presentation at Semi-Permanent in Sydney earlier this month and is best viewed full-screen with HD turned on so you can see the finer details. See much more of his work here.

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Wooden Illusions: Incredibly Lifelike Objects Carved from Wood by Tom Eckert

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Arizona-based artist Tom Eckert creates incredibly lifelike sculptures out of little more than wood, paint and patience. Working primarily with basswood, linden and limewood that is then coated with fine layers of lacquer paint, the artist can create realistic wrinkles in fabric or reflections that are almost impossible to discern from the real thing. Eckert says of his work:

Forms carved to suggest cloth recur in many of my pieces. By tradition, cloth has been widely used to conceal and shroud objects in practices ranging from advertising to church rituals. Covered forms are often more evocative – with a sense of mystery absent from the uncovered object by itself. I remember in church one Lent, as a child, being mystified while gazing at the statues shrouded with purple cloth.

You can watch the video above to learn more about his technique or explore his online galleries to see much more. If you liked this, also check out the work of Randall Rosenthal. (via twisted sifter)

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Welded Shovel Pine Cones by Floyd Elzinga

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Artist Floyd Elzinga works with a wide variety of materials to create sculptural landscapes, installations, and even cut steel flags. My favorite of his works are these giant metal pine cones made from welded spade heads, check out a few more over on Flickr. (via haynay)

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Anti-Gravity Object Modeling: “Mataerial” is a Robot That Draws Sculptures in 3D

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A few months ago we saw the invention of the world’s first 3D printing pen, the 3Doodler, that allows people to draw small objects seemingly out of thin air. Now, a large team of researchers including Petr Novikov, Saša Jokić from the Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IAAC) and Joris Laarman Studio, have decided to up the ante. The result of the team’s research is Mataerial, a large robotic tool that can draw three dimensional objects that sprout vertically from the ground or horizontally from a wall, seemingly without regard to the effects of gravity. Where traditional 3D printers print layer after layer of 2D material to build more complex shapes, Mataerial relies on a chemical reaction between two components of a thermosetting polymer to solidify almost instantly as it extrudes from a nozzle. Perhaps the Mataerial team says it better:

One of the key innovations of anti-gravity object modelling is the use of thermosetting polymers instead of thermoplastics that are used in existing 3D printers. The material is cured because of a chemical reaction between two source components with such proportion of extrusion and movement speeds that it comes solid out of the nozzle; this feature makes it possible to print hanging curves without support material.

The device can even alter the color of the material being used to create gradients or other shifts in hue in real time. The team also proposed the creation of much larger structures such as a pavillion that could be constructed on-site with the assistance of multiple Mataerial devices.

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I for one welcome our new gravity defying, 3D-printing overlords and can’t wait to see where things go next. You can read much more about Mataerial on the team’s website and stay tuned to their Facebook or blog for more developments. (via dezeen)

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A Giant Aluminum Snake Skeleton Rises from a Pool of Water at the Queensland Art Gallery

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Currently on view at the Queensland Art Gallery is Ressort, a 174-foot (53 meter) aluminum and stainless steel snake skeleton by French/Chinese contemporary artist Huang Yong Ping. The twisting metal sculpture was commissioned for the Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art at QAGOMA which is the only major exhibition that focuses exclusively on contemporary art from Asia, the Pacific and Australia. The snake plays a prominent role in much of Ping’s artwork, as the symbol of the serpent is generally considered a good omen in Chinese culture. You can see much more of the artist’s work over at Kamel Mennour gallery. (via my modern met)

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