Category: Art

Astounding Origami by Nguyen Hung Cuong

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Paper artist Nguyễn Hùng Cường lives and works in Hanoi and folds many of his original, distinctly expressive origami works using a Vietnamese handmade paper called Dó. Cường tells All Things Paper that he began folding around the age of five or six and although his work has been featured in numerous popular books on origami, he has not yet made it his full-time career. See much more of his work on Flickr. All photos courtesy the artist. (via all things paper)

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Highlights from Sculpture by the Sea 2013 in Aarhus, Denmark

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Alejandro Propato / Permanent Sunrise

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Alejandro Propato / Permanent Sunrise

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Vibeke Noergaard Roensbo / Remind

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Phil Price / Snake

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Yeo Chee Kiong / A yoga and pedicure diy session on the beach

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Brandon Vickerd / Sputnik Returned

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The Glue Society / Once (An entire amusement park crushed into a 4 x 4 metre cube.)

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The Glue Society / Once, detail

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The Glue Society / Once, detail

Last week marked the opening of Sculpture by the Sea in Aarhus, Denmark including sculptural artworks from 64 artists hailing from 22 countries around the world. Above are some of my favorite works currently on view, including the jaw-dropping sculpture Once by James Dive of the Glue Society (previously) who managed to compress an entire mobile amusement park into a 4×4 meter cube, rides, games, prizes and all. Worst. Carnival. Ever. Also of note is Alejandro Propato’s Permanent Sunrise, a colorful thread installation that visually aligns with the actual location of the sunrise over Aarhus Bay. Sculpture by the Sea will be on view through the end of the month.

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Embroidered 3D Insects and Snails by Claire Moynihan

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Artist Claire Moynihan lives and works in rural Hertfordshire, England where she creates tiny sculptural insects and snails on felt balls using a variety of freeform embroidery techniques. After completing a collection of work Moynihan then organizes the pieces inside traditional entomological boxes which from a distance could almost pass for the real thing. See much more of her work in her gallery. (via lustik)

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A Hilltop Solarium Made with Panels of Caramelized Sugar by William Lamson

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William Lamson, Solarium, 2012. Steel, glass, sugar, plants. 10′ 10″ x 8′ 11″ x 10′ 3 3⁄8 in. (330.2 x 271.8 x 313 cm). Courtesy the artist and Pierogi Gallery. © Storm King Art Center

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William Lamson, Solarium, 2012. Steel, glass, sugar, plants. 10′ 10″ x 8′ 11″ x 10′ 3 3⁄8 in. (330.2 x 271.8 x 313 cm). Courtesy the artist and Pierogi Gallery. © Storm King Art Center

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William Lamson, Solarium, 2012. Steel, glass, sugar, plants. 10′ 10″ x 8′ 11″ x 10′ 3 3⁄8 in. (330.2 x 271.8 x 313 cm). Courtesy the artist and Pierogi Gallery. © Storm King Art Center

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William Lamson, Solarium, 2012. Steel, glass, sugar, plants. 10′ 10″ x 8′ 11″ x 10′ 3 3⁄8 in. (330.2 x 271.8 x 313 cm). Courtesy the artist and Pierogi Gallery. © Storm King Art Center

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William Lamson, Solarium, 2012. Steel, glass, sugar, plants. 10′ 10″ x 8′ 11″ x 10′ 3 3⁄8 in. (330.2 x 271.8 x 313 cm). Courtesy the artist and Pierogi Gallery. © Storm King Art Center

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William Lamson, Solarium, 2012. Steel, glass, sugar, plants. 10′ 10″ x 8′ 11″ x 10′ 3 3⁄8 in. (330.2 x 271.8 x 313 cm). Courtesy the artist and Pierogi Gallery. © Storm King Art Center

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William Lamson, Solarium, 2012. Steel, glass, sugar, plants. 10′ 10″ x 8′ 11″ x 10′ 3 3⁄8 in. (330.2 x 271.8 x 313 cm). Courtesy the artist and Pierogi Gallery. © Storm King Art Center

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William Lamson, Solarium, 2012. Steel, glass, sugar, plants. 10′ 10″ x 8′ 11″ x 10′ 3 3⁄8 in. (330.2 x 271.8 x 313 cm). Courtesy the artist and Pierogi Gallery. © Storm King Art Center

Designed and constructed by artist William Lamson, Solarium is a functional greenhouse with 162 windows made from carmelized sugar at the Storm King Art Center in Mountainville, New York. Via his artist statement:

Like a mountain chapel or Thoreau’s one-room cabin, Solarium references a tradition of isolated outposts designed for reflection. Each of the 162 panels is made of sugar cooked to different temperatures and then sealed between two panes of window glass. The space functions as both an experimental greenhouse, growing three species of miniature citrus trees, and a meditative environment. In warm months, a 5×8 ft panel on each side of the house opens up to allow viewers to enter and exit the house from all directions. In addition to creating a pavilion like environment, this design references the architecture of a plant leaf, where the stomata opens and closes to help regulate the plants temperature.

Lamson spent weeks testing methods for building the windows and you can watch his process in the video above by Kate Barker-Froyland. See many more views of the building here. All imagery courtesy the artist. (via architizer)

Update: Solarium was deinstalled at the end of 2012 and is no longer on view.

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Bang: Ai Weiwei’s Latest Installation Made from 886 Antique Stools

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Artist Ai Weiwei has unveiled a number of significant artworks in the last few weeks. The artist released a music video and created a large-scale diorama depicting scenes from his controversial imprisonment, and also created a sobering installation comprised of 150 tons of straightened rebar taken from schools that collapsed during the devastating 2008 Sichuan earthquake.

Lastly at the 2013 Venice Art Biennale Weiwei contributed an installation consisting of 886 wooden antique stools called Bang. For centuries in Chinese culture it was common for families to have at least one of these handcrafted 3-leg stools for use in the home that was often passed down through generations. As the country has developed at lightning speed the stools have quickly been replaced by plastic and metal alternatives. Weiwei salvaged hundreds of these stools and used them to build this sprawling and nearly organic installation in the German Pavilion. You can learn more over on designboom. Photos by Roman Mensing. (via ignant)

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Tugboat Printshop Carves and Prints “The Moon”

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Back in December Paul Roden and Valerie Lueth over at Tugboat Printshop shared a tantalizing peek at their largest hand-carved relief print ever, The Moon. The print is finally complete and it’s gorgeous. The illustration of the moon was first drawn with a pen onto a piece of 3/4″ birch plywood incorporating various topographical features of the actual moon. After that was carved the stars were carved into the sky on the same piece of wood, but the moon was then cut out with a jigsaw prior to printing.

If you’re interested, the duo published the process of how everything came together over on their website, and 200 copies of the limited edition print are now shipping. Next up: Desert Island.

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John Merritt Can Carve Almost Anything Out of a Single Piece of Wood

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This video has been around for a bit but it was new to me. Woodcarver John Merrit carves just about anything you can imagine out of a single piece of wood. He doesn’t do it for money, just the challenge of creating insanely intricate pieces as gifts for his wife, friends, or simply a personal sense of achievement. As the video went on my jaw dropped at how nonchalantly he presents each increasingly amazing object with a sense of “oh yeah, this old thing”. (via the awesomer)

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