Art

Section



Art Design History

An Early Christian Church Resurrected in Towering Wire Mesh by Edoardo Tresoldi

March 31, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

©Blindeyefactory_EdoardoTresoldi_Le Basiliche_2016_09

all images © Blind Eye Factory

With hundreds of yards of wire mesh artist Edoardo Tresoldi has built an interpretation of an early Christian church that once stood in its place at the current Archaeological Park of Siponto, Italy. Built with the assistance of the Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities and the Archaeology Superintendence of Puglia, the installation connects ancient archaeology with contemporary art. The sculpture stands on the former church’s site with a ghostly presence, looking almost like a hologram illuminated in the park. Despite its sheer appearance the installation contains detailed architetural elements including tiered columns, domes, and statues that stand within the structure.

You can see more of Tresoldi’s work on his Facebook and Behance.  (via Designboom)

©BlindEyeFactory_EdoardoTresoldi_S.MariadiSiponto_2016_001

©BlindEyeFactory_EdoardoTresoldi_S.MariadiSiponto_2016_021

©BlindEyeFactory_EdoardoTresoldi_S.MariadiSiponto_2016_023

©Blindeyefactory_EdoardoTresoldi_Le Basiliche_2016_33

©BlindEyeFactory_EdoardoTresoldi_S.MariadiSiponto_2016_042.

©BlindEyeFactory_EdoardoTresoldi_S.MariadiSiponto_2016_027

©BlindEyeFactory_EdoardoTresoldi_S.MariadiSiponto_2016_075.

©BlindEyeFactory_EdoardoTresoldi_S.MariadiSiponto_2016_085.

©BlindEyeFactory_EdoardoTresoldi_S.MariadiSiponto_2016_086.

©BlindEyeFactory_EdoardoTresoldi_S.MariadiSiponto_2016_090.

©BlindEyeFactory_EdoardoTresoldi_S.MariadiSiponto_2016_107.

©BlindEyeFactory_EdoardoTresoldi_S.MariadiSiponto_2016_098.

©BlindEyeFactory_EdoardoTresoldi_S.MariadiSiponto_2016_103.

 

 



Art

50,000 Solar Powered Bulbs Illuminate the Australian Desert in Bruce Munro’s Field of Light Installation

March 31, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

BruceMunro_04

All images courtesy of Bruce Munro

Over 50,000 bulbs light up an expanse of Australia’s Red Centre desert near Ayers Rock in an installation about the size of four football fields. The solar powered work, Field of Light Uluru, was produced by artist Bruce Munro who conceived of the idea while visiting Uluru in 1992. Twelve years later he created its first iteration in a field behind his home, and it has since moved the work around to several different sights across the United Kingdom, United States, and Mexico.

Field of Light was a project that refused to leave the artist’s sketchbook. “I saw in my mind a landscape of illuminated stems that, like the dormant seed in a dry desert, quietly wait until darkness falls, under a blazing blanket of southern stars, to bloom with gentle rhythms of light,” said Munro.

The British artist is best known for his light installations which often contain components numbering in the thousands. These large works refer to his own experience as being a tiny element to life’s larger pattern, and employ light as a way to tap into a more emotional response with his viewers.

Profits for the installation will benefit the local community. The Anangu tribe have named the piece Tili Wiru Tjuta Nyakutjaku in Pitjantjatjara which translates to “looking at lots of beautiful lights.”

You can visit the expansive installation yourself starting April 1st and running through March of 2017.

BruceMunro_03

BruceMunro_06

BruceMunro_02

BruceMunro_07  BruceMunro_05

BruceMunro_01

 

 



Art

Memories of Paintings: A Soothing Technicolor Mix of Paint, Oil, Milk and Liquid Soap

March 31, 2016

Christopher Jobson

Here’s a new experimental short titled Memories of Paintings from director Thomas Blanchard (previously) who continues to experiment with colorful paint, oil, milk, and liquid soap filmed with a macro lens as it mixes and cascades in front of the camera. I could watch footage like this forever. Set to music by Bronix.

25539650893_d0156b6e65_h

25539655213_b2d5a2a961_h

25539660133_f5b943429b_h

25869487050_4caed99697_h

26075996051_f5e14a4fd6_h

 

 



Art

New Walls and Canvases by Pichi & Avo That Mix Classic Greek Imagery With Graffiti Writing

March 30, 2016

Christopher Jobson

pichiavo-1

Mural in Boras, image via Pichi & Avo

Although Pichi & Avo (previously here and here) have continued to focus on their signature style of classic Greek gods and mythology intermixed with graffiti writing, their works have now migrated off the wall and onto the canvas. The duo still produces stories-high murals, like the two they contributed to the Puerto Street Art Festival in late 2015, but have also began to incorporate their work into a gallery setting. This past December they presented two acrylic and aerosol canvases at SCOPE art fair with C.A.V.E. Gallery, each appearing like a cross-section of one of their larger wall murals.

The two are also in a group exhibition titled “Rough Cast” currently at Colab Gallery in Germany through May 7, 2016. You can see more of Pichi & Avo’s murals from across the world on their Instagram. (via StreetArtNews)

pichiavo-2

Mural in Valencia, image via Pichi & Avo

pichiavo-3

Mural in Valencia, image via Pichi & Avo

pichiavo-4

“Bacchus Education,″ acrylic and aerosol on canvas, 57” x 45” (146 x 114 cm). Courtesy C.A.V.E. Gallery.

pichiavo-5

Courtesy Colab Gallery.

pichiavo-6

“Urban Warrior” at the Puerto Street Art Festival in Puerto de la Cruz, image via Pichi & Avo

pichiavo-7

Close up of “Urban Warrior” at the Puerto Street Art Festival in Puerto de la Cruz, image via Pichi & Avo

pichiavo-8

Mural in Fondi-Italy, image by Arianna Barone

 

 



Art Photography

Dramatic Aerial Landscape Photos of Our Impact on Nature Captured by Daniel Beltrá

March 30, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

February 8th 2007. Southern Ocean.

February 8th 2007, Southern Ocean, all images © Daniel Beltrá

During his past two decades as a photographer, Daniel Beltrá has photographed landscapes in all seven continents, exploring equally the beauty and tragedy found in nature across the globe. Beltrá works mostly in the air, providing the viewer with the expansive scale of what he encounters while perched inside an airplane or helicopter such as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill which he captured over the span of two months.

Other locations the Spanish photographer has traveled to included the Brazilian Amazon, the Arctic, the Southern Oceans, and the Patagonian ice fields. Beltrá was drawn to each of these locations due to the complexity of nature found at each. He explains in his artist statement that the “fragility of our ecosystems is a continuous thread throughout my work. My photographs show the vast scale of transformation our world is under from human-made stresses.”

Beltrá hopes that his unique aerial perspective and subject matter instill an understanding of how we are directly affecting the environment around us and at the edges of the globe. Many of his images from locations in Iceland and Greenland were recently included in his solo exhibition “Ice/Green Lands” at Catherine Edelman Gallery in Chicago that closed on March 5, 2016. The photographer also recently published a collection of his images from the 2010 BP oil spill in his book SPILL. You can see more of his expansive landscape photography on his Instagram and Facebook. (via Ignant)

August 19th, 2014. Ilulissat, Greenland

August 19th, 2014, Ilulissat, Greenland

August 24th, 2014. Ilulissat, Greenland

August 24th, 2014, Ilulissat, Greenland

July 7th 2014, Iceland aerials

July 7th 2014, Iceland aerials

Water in Iceland's Ölfusá River flows around sandbars towards the Atlantic Ocean, July 7th 2014. The Ölfusá is Iceland's largest river and its watershed drains 6100 square kilometers or 1/7th of Iceland, including the Langjökull glacier. According to a recent study by the University of Arizona to be published in Geophysical Research Letters, parts of Iceland are rising as much as 35mm per year; this is directly related to the melting of Iceland's glaciers and to global warming.

July 7th 2014, Iceland’s Ölfusá River

September 16, 2013. Brazil. Aerials from Manaus to Santarem. Photo by Daniel Beltra for Greenpeace

September 16, 2013, Brazil. Aerials from Manaus to Santarem

September 10th, 2012. Arctic Ocean. Greenpeace MY Arctic Sunrise ship expedition to the Arctic to document the lowest sea ice level on record. Photo by Daniel Beltra for Greenpeace

September 10th, 2012, Arctic Ocean

Para, Brazil. February 11, 2012. Aerials south of Santarem and along the road BR163. Rainforest in the Tapajós River, coordinates: -4.737923-56.448047. Photo by Daniel Beltra for Greenpeace

February 11, 2012, Para, Brazil

Louisiana (USA). May 6th, 2010. Aerial view of the oil leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead, the BP leased oil platform exploded April 20 and sank after burning. Leaking an estimate of more than 200,000 gallons of crude oil per day from the broken pipeline to the sea. Eleven workers are missing, presumed dead. Photo by Daniel Beltra/Greenpeace

May 6th, 2010, Aerial view of the oil leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead

 

 



Art

Suspended Tree Sculptures Connect an Artist to His Cuban Roots

March 30, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

Jorge_Mayet_06

“Espiritual conexion” (2012), paper, cable, fabric, acrylics and wood, 17.7 x 39.3 x 19.6 inch, all images via Jorge Mayet

Jorge Mayet's tree sculptures produced from paper, wire, fabric, and acrylic showcase the ways in which a tree’s roots often mimic the branches that sprout above ground. In these suspended works the underground systems are far more expansive than what appears above the earth, showing the viewer that what typically appears before us is only half of the real picture. Hanging from invisible wires, Mayet works are a conceptual connection to his own memories and roots growing up in Cuba, a visual metaphor for being uprooted from his home country.

The Cuban expatriate currently lives and works in Mallorca, Spain where he focuses his practice on allegorical landscapes like the ones seen here. You can see more of Mayet’s sculptures on his Facebook. (via Cross Connect Magazine)

Jorge_Mayet_07

“Me desprendo de ti” (2009), paper, wire, fabric and acrylic, 66.9 x 23.6 x 23.6 inch

Jorge_Mayet_05

Close up of Me desprendo de ti (2009), paper, wire, fabric and acrylic

Jorge_Mayet_08

“Untitled” (2009), paper, wire, fabric and acrylic, 39.3 x 19.6 x 19.6 inch

Jorge_Mayet_01

“Ochún” (2009), wood, paper, wire, fabric and acrylic, 39.3 x 19.6 x 19.6 inch

Jorge_Mayet_10

“Sobre natural” (2008), wire, paper maché, textil and acrylics, 62.9 x 33.8 x 33.8 inch

Jorge_Mayet_02

“A todos mis santos” (2008), paper, wire, acrylics and yarn, 45.2 x 27.5 x 23.6 inch

Jorge_Mayet_03

“Corazón de Fuego” (2010), paper, cable, fabric, acrylics and resin, 55.1 x 33.4 x 33.4 inch

Jorge_Mayet_11

“Tierra nueva” (2009), paper, wire, fabric and acrylic, 39.3 x 19.6 x 19.6 inch

Jorge_Mayet_04

“Culto dialéctico de lo sagrado” (2010), paper, feathers, beads and acrylic, 15.3 x 53.1 x 26.3 inch

 

 



Art Craft

Explosive Cut Paper Sculptures by Clare Pentlow

March 28, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

Clare_PentlowAM_04

Image via Ann Martin

Clare Pentlow makes delicate paper look almost dangerous, in the most organized and beautiful way. Cutting hundreds of sharp points into folded layers of paper, Pentlow forms circular designs that mimic the center of exotic flowers. The works are typically composed of a multitude of colors, yet the monochrome pieces do not pale in comparison to their bright companions. You can see more of the London-based artist’s concentric artworks on her Instagram and Twitter.  (via All Things Paper)

Clare_Pentlow_01

Image courtesy of Clare Pentlow

Clare_PentlowAM_02

Image via Ann Martin

Clare_PentlowAM_06

Image via Ann Martin

Clare_PentlowAM_05

Image via Ann Martin

Clare_PentlowAM_07

Image via Ann Martin

Clare_PentlowAM_03

Image via Ann Martin

Clare_PentlowAM_01

Image via Ann Martin