Category: Art

Architectural Columns at the Palais de Tokyo Explode into Organic Forms

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Recently installed at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris, this gigantic Gordian Knot was constructed by Brazilian artist Henrique Oliveira who is known for his near complete organic transformations of interior and exterior spaces. Titled Baitogogo, the work depicts an architectural grid of columns and support beams that seem to morph into a chaotic tangle of branches or roots. Via the Palais de Tokyo:

Through a kind of architectural anthropomorphism, Henrique Oliveira reveals the building’s structure. At Palais de Tokyo, he plays on the space’s existing and structuring features, prolonging and multiplying pillars in order to endow them with a vegetable and organic dimension, as though the building were coming alive. The artist draws inspiration from medical textbooks, amongst others, and particularly from studies of physical pathologies such as tumors. Through a formal analogy, these outgrowths evoke the outermost layers of the bark of a common tree.

The installation will be in view through September 9th, 2013. Photos by André Morin. (via dark silence in suburbia)

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Birds Made of Flower Petals and Leaves by Red Hong Yi

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Peacock made of butterfly pea flowers, bottlebrush leaves, coconut leaf sticks, allamandas/trumpet flowers

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Rooster made of gerberas and leaves

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Parrot made from butterfly peas and gerberas

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Kingfisher made of gerberas, butterfly peas and purple shamrocks

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Hornbill made of chrysanthemums, germeras and purple shamrocks

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Flamingos made from pink gerberas and twigs

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Flamingo made from pink gerberas and twigs

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Northern cardinal made of red gerberas and deep purple chrysanthemums with dill

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Known for her numerous art projects where images are created using numerous objects, artist Red Hong Yi has begun a new series of birds made with flower petals and leaves. You might remember the project from earlier this spring where she played with her food. Many more birds are forthcoming and you can follow along via Instagram. (via designboom)

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Mirror City: A Kaleidoscopic Timelapse of Chicago, San Francisco, San Diego, Vegas and L.A.

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Mirror City is the latest video from photographer and filmmaker Michael Shainblum that takes time-lapse footage of Chicago, San Francisco, San Diego, Las Vegas and Los Angeles and runs it through a constantly shifting kaleidoscopic pattern of mirrors. Shainblum says of the piece took about four months to edit and adds:

These clips were all processed from their original form, into the kaleidoscopic visuals that you see in this video. Many people visit these large cities every day, and all of these places have been shot and filmed, but I wanted to emulate these urban landscapes in a way that nobody has even seen before. I wanted to put man-made geometric shapes, mixed with elements of color and movement to create less of a structured video, and more of a plethora of visual stimulation.

And a plethora of visual stimulation it is indeed. The fun part for me was trying to recognize all of the different cities as the patterns become more abstract and chaotic. Amazing editing. I definitely suggest watching it full-screen with HD turned on. (via vimeo)

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Infinity: A Mind-Bending New Sand Sculpture by Carl Jara

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Cleveland-based sand sculptor and woodworker Carl Jara (previously) just won fist-place at the Hampton Beach Master Sand Sculpting Competition with this fun sculpture titled Infinity. The piece, which also won the People’s Choice award, depicts a series of five consecutive human figures in the palm of another, each one smaller than the last. As an added bonus, he shot a time-lapse video of the entire piece coming together over a period of three days (warning: dubstep). In the various sand sculpture competitions around the U.S. Jara frequently comes in near or at first place with a imaginative range of figurative works.

You can check out more photos from the Hampton Beach event on Jara’s Flickr page. All photos courtesy Carl Jara.

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Street Artist Ludo Merges Technology and Nature to Create a New Order of Hybrid Organisms

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Paris-based artist Ludo (previously) has been active lately with works popping up all over France. His trademark monochromatic paste-ups with dripping green highlights often merge technology with plants or insects to create what he calls a “new order of hybrid organisms”. To see more of his work you can always stop by StreetArtNews or follow the artist’s blog.

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Pardon My Dust: The Chalk Art of Peter Han

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Designer Peter Han (he rejects being called an artist) has worked as a conceptual designer for a number of different video games and films, but has also become known for a drawing class he teaches called Dynamic Sketching. Using only chalk, Han works with his students to let go of their preconceived notions about art and design by working in a fast, impermanent medium that always ends up being erased. The hope is to eventually free them from the idea of permanence and allow their ideas to grow through making mistakes.

In this short film titled Pardon My Dust directed by Adriel de la Torre, we catch a quick glimpse of Han at work as he works with his students and draws some impressive illustrations that of course meet a fateful end under a felt eraser. (via colossal submissions)

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Melting Ceramics by Livia Marin

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When dropping a ceramic plate or cup we’ve all braced for the familiar sound of impact as the object explodes into a multitude of sharp fragments on the kitchen floor. Artist Livia Marin imagines a wholly different demise for ceramic bowls, cups and tea pots in this series of work titled Nomad Patterns.

Inexplicably, each piece seems to melt onto a surface while strangely retaining its original printed pattern. The designs are actually a Willow Pattern motif, a pastiche of Chinese landscape decoration created by an English man in the 1790s “as if” it were Chinese. She adds via email that the objects “appear as staged somehow indeterminately between something that is about to collapse or has just been restored; between things that have been invested with the attention of care but also have the appearance of a ruin.” The 32 objects were on view at Eagle Gallery in London in 2012.

You can see much more over on her website, and learn more at Eagle Gallery. (via if magazine)

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