Category: Art

Banksy’s ‘Better Out Than In’ New York Residency is Now a Book by Ray Mock 

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Re-Photo by Jaime Rojo for Brooklyn Street Art

If you enjoyed Banksy’s wild romp through the streets of New York last year as part of his ‘Better Out than In’ residency, the entire 31 days is now meticulously documented in this new book from photographer Ray Mock. Available now from Carnage, Banksy in New York features over 120 photographs and illustrations organized day by day during the course of the artist’s New York escapade. Only 2,000 copies were printed and they’re selling quick. See more over on Brooklyn Street Art. (via Brooklyn Street Art)

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Re-Photo by Jaime Rojo for Brooklyn Street Art

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Artist Hinke Schreuders Alters 1950s Advertising and Fashion Photography with Hand-Stitched Embroidery 

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Starting with vintage photography and illustrations of models sporting fashions from the 1950s, Amsterdam-based artist Hinke Schreuders applies a rich layer of hand-stitched embroidery, beading, lace, and flourishes of ink to entirely new images that can be both unsettling and exuberant. The pieces seen here are part of an ongoing series called Works on Paper, started in 2008. With her work Schreuders says she seeks to “subtly confuse notions of feminine vulnerability and reinforce the position of embroidery as an artistic medium,” something I think we can all agree she has done masterfully.

Schreuders most recently exhibited as part of a group show at Robert Mann gallery titled the The Embroiderederd Image which brought together almost a dozen artists currently working at the intersection of photography and embroidery or textiles. She’ll have more work on view in Amsterdam next month at both We Like Art and Amsterdam Drawing 2014. You can follow more of her work on Facebook.

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(via Hyperallergic, Mister Finch)

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Surreal Worlds Digitally Painted by Gediminas Pranckevicius 

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Conceptual artist and illustrator Gediminas Pranckevicius possesses an imagination to covet. While most of his digital painting is centered around character design, his larger landscapes seen here are rich in detail, creating impossible but ingenious juxtapositions of water, land, and haphazard architecture. You can see more of his work over on Facebook, and all of these are available as prints via INPRNT.

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Ornate Painted Dragons Based on a Single Giant Brush Stroke 

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One of the most common feelings I get when watching an artist working is “oh, that looks easy.” After all, the materials and method are all right in front of you: paint or ink, a paint brush or pen, and a hand that moves deftly across a canvas. What goes completely unseen of course are the years upon years of practice, the trials and failures, and the possession of innate talent. A great example of this are these Japanese dragon paintings that are rendered almost completely with a single stroke of paint.

According to Japanese culture blog Iromegane, the paintings are called Hitofude Ryuu (Dragon with one stroke), and the ones shown here originate from a small studio called Kousyuuya in Nikko, Japan. The studio has seen four generations of master painters who have been creating these stylized dragons for decades.

The process involves carefully painting an ornate dragon head with various flourishes, and then finishing the piece using a giant sumi brush in a carefully orchestrated stroke. The process has much in common with both ink wash painting and calligraphy, and similar to letterforms, the images are often repeated. From the videos you can see certain designs are reused in different colors or with added details. All the videos here start at the fun part where the torso is painted, but you can rewind them a bit to see the creation of the entire painting. (via Cineraria, Iromegane)

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Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys 

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Decoy Study (Duck), 2014. 15 x 5 x 6 inches.

For his latest body of work, artist Maskull Lasserre acquired a number of souvenir sculptures, the kind found in antique stores or craft fairs that have been mass-produced by anonymous artists, which he then used as a foundation for his own artwork. In a process he refers to as “re-carving,” Lasserre removed details from the artist’s original work to reveal intricate skeletal structures, a process we’ve marveled at numerous times over the last few years here on Colossal. If you happen to be in New York, the pieces are on view for two more days at Junior Projects as part of the Regular JOhn show curated by Jim Lee. You can see many more photos of each piece over in Lasserre’s portfolio. (via Design Milk)

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Decoy Study (Duck), 2014. 15 x 5 x 6 inches.

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Decoy Study (Duck), 2014. 15 x 5 x 6 inches.

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Souvenir Skeleton, 2014. (re-)carved African drummer figure. 10 x 5 x 26 inches.

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Souvenir Skeleton, 2014. (re-)carved African drummer figure. 10 x 5 x 26 inches.

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Souvenir Skeleton, 2014. (re-)carved African drummer figure. 10 x 5 x 26 inches.

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Souvenir Skeleton, 2014. (re-)carved African drummer figure. 10 x 5 x 26 inches.

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Shaman Anatomy, 2014. (re-)carved South American shaman bust. 5 x 5 x 20 inches.

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Shaman Anatomy, 2014. (re-)carved South American shaman bust. 5 x 5 x 20 inches.

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Shaman Anatomy, 2014. (re-)carved South American shaman bust. 5 x 5 x 20 inches.

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Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren 

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Stockholm-based illustrator, printmaker, and artist Nina Lindgren was been working with cardboard to build a series of stacked geometric cityscapes that look like small architectural islands. The works are assembled like puzzles from carefully cut cardboard panels with internal lights for some of the houses. Her most recent piece, “Floating City” was recently on view at ArtRebels Gallery. You can see more over on her website. (via Hi-Fructose)

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