Category: Art

Welded Shovel Pine Cones by Floyd Elzinga

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Artist Floyd Elzinga works with a wide variety of materials to create sculptural landscapes, installations, and even cut steel flags. My favorite of his works are these giant metal pine cones made from welded spade heads, check out a few more over on Flickr. (via haynay)

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Anti-Gravity Object Modeling: “Mataerial” is a Robot That Draws Sculptures in 3D

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A few months ago we saw the invention of the world’s first 3D printing pen, the 3Doodler, that allows people to draw small objects seemingly out of thin air. Now, a large team of researchers including Petr Novikov, Saša Jokić from the Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IAAC) and Joris Laarman Studio, have decided to up the ante. The result of the team’s research is Mataerial, a large robotic tool that can draw three dimensional objects that sprout vertically from the ground or horizontally from a wall, seemingly without regard to the effects of gravity. Where traditional 3D printers print layer after layer of 2D material to build more complex shapes, Mataerial relies on a chemical reaction between two components of a thermosetting polymer to solidify almost instantly as it extrudes from a nozzle. Perhaps the Mataerial team says it better:

One of the key innovations of anti-gravity object modelling is the use of thermosetting polymers instead of thermoplastics that are used in existing 3D printers. The material is cured because of a chemical reaction between two source components with such proportion of extrusion and movement speeds that it comes solid out of the nozzle; this feature makes it possible to print hanging curves without support material.

The device can even alter the color of the material being used to create gradients or other shifts in hue in real time. The team also proposed the creation of much larger structures such as a pavillion that could be constructed on-site with the assistance of multiple Mataerial devices.

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I for one welcome our new gravity defying, 3D-printing overlords and can’t wait to see where things go next. You can read much more about Mataerial on the team’s website and stay tuned to their Facebook or blog for more developments. (via dezeen)

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A Giant Aluminum Snake Skeleton Rises from a Pool of Water at the Queensland Art Gallery

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Currently on view at the Queensland Art Gallery is Ressort, a 174-foot (53 meter) aluminum and stainless steel snake skeleton by French/Chinese contemporary artist Huang Yong Ping. The twisting metal sculpture was commissioned for the Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art at QAGOMA which is the only major exhibition that focuses exclusively on contemporary art from Asia, the Pacific and Australia. The snake plays a prominent role in much of Ping’s artwork, as the symbol of the serpent is generally considered a good omen in Chinese culture. You can see much more of the artist’s work over at Kamel Mennour gallery. (via my modern met)

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Fun Site-Specific Wheatpastes on the Streets of France by Levalet

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I recently stumbled onto the Facebook page of a new wheatpaste artist named Levalet who has been making some pretty imaginative site-specific pasteups in various locations around France since late last year. Almost all of his pieces interact with their direct surroundings and frequently include props or other three-dimensional objects. You can see more over on his blog, and if you happen to be in the south of France he just opened an exhibition at NUNC ! Grenoble last week.

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Surreal Wildlife Paintings by Tiffany Bozic

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Self-taught artist Tiffany Bozic explores a wide range of natural themes in her tightly rendered depictions of wildlife. Drawing inspiration from her “extensive travels to wild places” and exposure to various research specimens at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco, the artist works most frequently with multiple layers of watered down acrylic paint on panels of maple wood that lends a distinctly natural and often realistic level of detail to each of her paintings. Bozic is currently working on a new body of work for a solo show at FFDG this coming October, but for now you can see more work in her portfolio (and archive) on her website.

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Soo Sunny Park’s Unwoven Light Documented by Walley Films

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If you enjoyed learning about Soo Sunny Park’s Unwoven Light installation at Rice Gallery earlier this month, you’ll like this new documentary short by filmmaking duo Angela and Mark Walley of Walley Films. The film covers the installation period and opening of Park’s chain-link fence installation and you learn quite a bit more about the artist’s process and intent behind her imaginative, surreal artwork. If you’re unable to make it to Houston to see this in person, this is the next best thing.

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New Hyperrealistic Sculptures by Ron Mueck

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Ron Mueck’s Studio, January 2013. Photo by Gautier Deblonde.

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Photo by Thomas Salva courtesy Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain.

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Photo by Thomas Salva courtesy Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain.

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Photo by Thomas Salva courtesy Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain.

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Photo by Thomas Salva courtesy Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain.

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Photo by Thomas Salva courtesy Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain.

Hyperrealist sculptor Ron Mueck works in the realm of the ultra-real where he spends hundreds of hours perfecting the shape of the human form, the appropriate color of skin, and the most realistic hair texture. All of his efforts culminate in incredibly lifelike figurative sculptures with one small (or large) exception: the artworks are often gigantic or miniaturized, resulting in an uncomfortable “does not compute” moment when trying to comprehend exactly what you’re looking at. Each sculpted person is as bizarre as it is amazing, in part because of the raw intimacy portrayed in their faces, as if we are somehow witnessing the documentation of a private moment.

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Ron Mueck’s Studio, January 2013. Photo by Gautier Deblonde.

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Photo by Thomas Salva courtesy Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain.

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Photo by Thomas Salva courtesy Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain.

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Photo by Thomas Salva courtesy Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain.

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Photo by Thomas Salva courtesy Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain.

Like several other hyperrealist sculptors Mueck began his sculpting career in entertainment where he started work as a puppeteer, creating models and puppets for children’s movies and TV shows. Most notably he worked on Jim Henson’s film Labyrinth and even provided the voice for the character Ludo. In 1996 he made the switch to fine art and quickly rose to prominence with exhibitions at the Royal Academy and the National Gallery in London.

Last month Mueck unveiled three new works at the Fondation Cartier in Paris as part of an exhibition that runs through September 29th, including the extraordinary Couple Under an Umbrella shown above. You can watch the video to get a little more perspective on just how large this artwork really is. All images above courtesy Fondation Cartier. (via my amp goes to 11)

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