Category: Art

Miya Ando’s Flotilla of 1,000 Bioluminescent Leaves

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Last year artist Miya Ando traveled to Puerto Rico where she released 1,000 non-toxic resin leaves coated with phosphorescence into a small pond. During the day the leaves would “recharge” and at night would give off a ghostly, ethereal glow much like the light of a firefly. Titled Obon, the installation was inspired by a Japanese Buddhist festival of the same name that honors the spirits of one’s ancestors. The leaves were also meant to simulate Puerto Rico’s bioluminescent bays, a natural phenomenon caused by dinoflagellates, photosynthetic underwater organisms that emit light when agitated.

You can learn more about Ando’s artwork over at Spoon and Tamago who stopped by for a studio visit not to long ago. You can also follow her on Tumblr and if you’re in the NYC area next month she’ll have a solo exhibition at Sundaram Tagore Gallery starting June 20th. Photography courtesy L. Young.

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The World’s Largest Rubber Duck Arrives in Hong Kong

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This week conceptual artist Florentijin Hofman brought his gargantuan Rubber Duck artwork to Victoria Harbour in Hong Kong. The huge inflatable duck measures nearly 46 feet tall and 55 feet long and is shown above being pulled by a tug boat only a fraction of its size. Hofman is well known for his grandiose and whimsical sculptures that seem born with the primary goal of inducing as many smiles possible. Via the artist’s website:

The Rubber Duck knows no frontiers, it doesn’t discriminate people and doesn’t have a political connotation. The friendly, floating Rubber Duck has healing properties: it can relieve mondial tensions as well as define them. The rubber duck is soft, friendly and suitable for all ages!

According to SCMP Rubber Duck will be on display in the harbor through June 9th, 2013. (via laughing squid, my modern met)

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Pool, The Alchemy of Blue—Found Concrete Installations by Lizzie Buckmaster Dove

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Photo courtesy David Corbett

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Photo courtesy David Corbett

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Photo courtesy David Corbett

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Photo courtesy Lizzie Buckmaster Dove

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Photo courtesy Lizzie Buckmaster Dove

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Photo courtesy Bernie Fischer

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Photo courtesy Bernie Fischer

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Photo courtesy Bernie Fischer

Coledale is a small seaside village in New South Wales, Australia, a place known for its surfing and slow pace of life. It’s also home to artist Lizzie Buckmaster Dove who for years has taken daily walks along the beach, stopping to pick up things she found along the way. One of the objects she collected most frequently were smooth stones painted light blue on a single side which she would eventually discover were fragments of an oceanside sea pool that was being slowly consumed by the surf.

With help from a grant provided by the Australia Council for the Arts, Dove set to work on a series of installations using the swimming pool concrete. Titled Pool, The Alchemy of Blue, the works are meant as sort of an homage to lunar cycles and the moon’s power to create the tides that reclaimed the Coledale pool. Before an imminent construction project to completely resurface the pool Dove collected even larger pieces of the pool which would eventually help form the suspended installation you see above at Wollongong City Gallery.

You can see a video of Dove discussing the series by Theme Media and see much more work on her website.

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Relativity: Surreal Paintings of Indecision and Uncertainty by Alex Hall

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After graduating college Nashville-based artist Alex Hall found himself on an uncertain path, overwhelmed and unsure of what was going to happen next. In an attempt to visualize his emotions and inner turmoil he set about creating a series of surreal oil paintings titled Relativity depicting anonymous people in similar forms of free-fall and indecision. Just looking at these images I believe Hall has an extremely promising career ahead of him. All of his new works are currently available as giclee art prints, and if you own a gallery I might consider getting in touch with him.

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Bottom Feeders: Ceramic Objects Encrusted with Marine Life by Mary O’Malley

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As if lifted from the wreckage of the Titanic, ceramic artist Mary O’Malley creates sculptural porcelain teapots, cups, and vases adorned with barnacles, tentacles, and other living sea creatures (she refers to them as “porcelain crustaceans”). Many original works from this series titled ‘Bottom Feeders’ are available over on Etsy. (via laughing squid)

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An Interactive Forest of Musical Lasers by Marshmallow Laser Feast

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Laser Forest is the lastest creation from a creative studio known as Marshmallow Laser Feast comprised of Memo Akten, Robin McNicholas, and Barney Steel who have focused almost exclusively on creating interactive experiences over the past two years. This latest installation involves a forest of 150 interactive rods installed in an empty factory space that when touched trigger both light and audio cues, effectively creating a large interactive instrument. Laser Forest was commission for the STRP Biennale in Eindhoven last month, and you can learn much more about at the Creators Project.

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Realistic Birds Made from Paper and Watercolor Paint by Johan Scherft

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At the age of 14 Johan Scherft made his first papercraft bird which he colored with a pencil, modeled after the flying paper models of english artist of Malcolm Topp. His self-created models along with his drawings gained him admittance to the royal academy of arts in The Hague where he perfected his painting and sculptural techniques. Nearly 30 years later the Dutch artist has become a master of the medium creating a wide variety of objects including dinosaurs, animals, boats, and especially birds. Scherft uses a computer to aid in the initial steps of creating the paper blueprints but everything else is done by hand, a painstaking process that can take several days and occasionally up to a full month to complete.

If you want to explore a bit more head over to his Facebook page and read a bit more about his process on My Modern Met. Scherft also keeps an active YouTube channel where he’s filmed numerous tutorials; don’t miss his solar-powered hummingbird.

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