Category: Art

Killer Pumpkin Arrangements at the Great Jack O’Lantern Blaze 

Copyright Bryan Haeffele for Historic Hudson Valley

Copyright Bryan Haeffele for Historic Hudson Valley

Copyright Joshua Bousel

Copyright Joshua Bousel

Copyright Joshua Bousel


Copyright Joshua Bousel



Held every year in New York, the Great Jack O’Lantern Blaze is a 25-night-long Halloween event featuring some 5,000 hand-carved, illuminated pumpkins arranged into dinosaurs, sea monsters, zombies, and other spooky sculptural forms. Via Instagram:

Although only associated with Halloween as we know it today since the late 1800s, the tradition of gourd carving dates back to the 18th and 19th centuries in rural Ireland and England. People created jack o’lanterns for the old holidays of Samhain and All Souls’ Night when spirits were thought to be the most active. Grotesque faces carved into the objects were meant to frighten away any ghouls seeking to do harm.

See many more photos over on Flickr and Facebook. Several photos above courtesy Joshua Bousel and Bryan Haeffele. (via the Instagram Blog)

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Fish Lamps by Frank Gehry 









Back in January of this year architect and artist Frank Gehry unveiled this striking series of fish lamps at Gagosian Beverly Hills and later in Paris. The glowing fish are constructed from jagged scales of ColorCore formica mounted on a wireframe and are an extension of a series of similar lights first built between 1984 and 1986. The story goes that while working on a commission for Formica back in the 80s Gehry dropped a piece of ColorCore which shattered, inspiring the idea of fish scales. You can see more views over at Gagosian and on Flickr. (via Dezeen)

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Cut Feather Shadowboxes by Chris Maynard 











Using feathers acquired from zoos and private aviaries, artist Chris Maynard creates delicately constructed shadowboxes that play with aspects of light and negative space. The artist admits to being “feather obsessed” and is fascinated not only with birds and flight, but with the color and texture of their plumage which he explores through his small dioramas. You can see much more on his website and Gerald Peters Gallery in Santa Fe will soon be showing some of Maynard’s larger work. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Anthony Howe’s Otherworldly Kinetic Sculptures Powered by Wind 


The Creator’s Project recently visited with kinetic sculptor Anthony Howe who creates kinetic artworks powered by wind. You might remember Howe from a piece here on Colossal back in July. Watch the video above to learn more about his artistic philosophy and watch some excellent footage of his hypnotic sculptures.

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Artist Morgan Herrin Transforms Construction Grade Lumber into Surreal Classical Sculptures 

Untitled (2008), dimensional lumber (2×4’s), 82″ x 18″ x 12″

Untitled (2008), dimensional lumber (2×4’s), 82″ x 18″ x 12″

Copper Gate (2011), wood, 32″ x 19″ x 12″

Copper Gate (2011), wood, 32″ x 19″ x 12″

Untitled (Knight)

Untitled (Knight)

“Globe” 2010, Pine 2×4’s, Figure is life-size.

“Globe” 2010, Pine 2×4’s, Figure is life-size.

Based in Richmond, Virginia artist Morgan Herrin transforms the most humble material—laminated construction grade 2x4s—into spectacularly detailed figurative sculptures. His choice of imagery is surreal: a noble 15th century knight melts into a network of dripping stalagmites or a classical marble bust that is overgrown with parasitic sea creatures. The resulting works are a fascinating juxtaposition of material and subject matter that require up to a year of labor to produce. Of the untitled knight piece Herrin says:

Untitled (Knight) is the product of the combination of two subjects: 15th century plate armor, and geological cave structure. Studied separately, these two subjects are completely unrelated. The manmade geometric precision of plate armor is formally opposite of the flowing, organic stalactites and stalagmites. Seen together, these two parts present a striking contrast in form and create a theme of time and the effects of nature. The pose of the figure and the general composition are references to the classical sculpture “The Dying Gaul” of ancient Roman antiquity. Rendered entirely in laminated construction-grade 2 by 4s, the material itself irreverently contradicts this classical allusion, and at the same time draws attention to our own culture’s reliance on the fast, cheap, and impermanent.

You can learn more about Herrin’s work at ADA Gallery, and Mulherin + Pollard. All images courtesy ADA Gallery. (via My Modern Met)

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Uncomfortable Sandpaper Sculptures by Mandy Smith 







While at first these tiny paper objects by artist and designer Mandy Smith seem like playful miniature figures from a dollhouse, one shudders to imagine their application when you realize they’re made of carefully sculpted from sandpaper. From the scratchy bikini to the chaffing slide and the unspeakable horror of the toilet paper roll, each is more uncomfortable than the last. Yet it’s hard to deny Smith’s amazing talent in bending such an unforgiving material to her will. Photos by Bruno Drummond. (via It’s Nice That)

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Cameron Moll’s Typographic Letterpress Print of the Brooklyn Bridge 





brooklyn-6Letterpress detail from Colosseo

Letterpress detail from Salt Lake

Designer Cameron Moll recently announced a new Kickstarter for a letterpress print of the Brooklyn Bridge constructed entirely from typography. Moll worked entirely in Adobe Illustrator to draw the artwork, and while some sections can be copied and pasted roughly 70-80% of the characters in the artwork were positioned, sized, and rotated one by one. To give you an idea of what the final piece will look like you can see two similar works the designer previously designed, Colosseo and Salt Lake. See more over on Kickstarter.

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