Art

Section



Art Illustration

Tiny Ink Drawings Scaled to the Size of Pencils, Fingers, and Matchsticks by Christian Watson

March 21, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

ChristianWatson_11

All images courtesy of Christian Watson (@1924us)

Christian Watson, illustrator and owner of 1924, posts images to Instagram multiple times a day, pictures that showcase his cross-country adventures, vintage cameras, and sporadically his own miniature ink drawings that are often less than a half an inch tall. The tiny illustrations seem to mimic the rustic adventures found in his photographs—pulling in log cabins, lighthouses, and animals that teeter on the tip of his pencils or crawl to the top of his fingers. Take a look at more of Watson’s hand lettering and micro illustrations on his website. (via Arch Atlas)

ChristianWatson_04

ChristianWatson_10

ChristianWatson_09

ChristianWatson_08

ChristianWatson_06

ChristianWatson_05

ChristianWatson_03

ChristianWatson_02

ChristianWatson_07

 

 



Art Photography

Things Organized Neatly: A New Book of Compulsively Organized Things by Austin Radcliffe

March 18, 2016

Christopher Jobson

ThingsOrganizedNeatly_p030

Sarah Illenberger

One of my oldest sources of visual inspiration on the internet (and one of a handful of early art/design blogs that inspired me to start Colossal in 2010) was Things Organized Neatly, an exhaustive catalogue of objects compulsively organized just so. From toy collections, to artworks and editorial photography, the site collects thousands of images of neatly arranged things that have a near Zen-like impact on your brain as you scroll through the site.

Run by blogger and curator Austin Radcliffe, Things Organized Neatly has picked up more press and awards over the years than almost any other tumblelog. Now, after six years of publishing, the very best of Things Organized Neatly has made its way to print in a new book published by Universe, with a foreward by artist Tom Sachs. Can’t wait to get my hands on a copy.

Update: Things Organized Neatly is now available in the Colossal Shop.

ThingsOrganizedNeatly_p021

Jim Golden

ThingsOrganizedNeatly_p038

Michael Johansson

ThingsOrganizedNeatly_p070

Scheltens & Abbenes

ThingsOrganizedNeatly_p084-085

Jason Travis

ThingsOrganizedNeatly_p092-093

The Voorhes

ThingsOrganizedNeatly_cover

 

 



Art Science

Colorful Basket Weaving Sculptures by Nathalie Miebach Transform Weather Data into Visual Art

March 18, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

MusicalBuoy1

“Musical Buoy in Search Towards a New Shore” (2009), all images courtesy of Nathalie Miebach

Nathalie Miebach‘s colorful sculptures look like children’s toys gone awry, as if the designer included far too many twists and turns for a child to possibly follow. It would make sense that these twisted routes would throw one off course, as they are modeled from scientific data pulled from wind patterns, often from storms, gales or blizzards. Miebach translates this quantified data into physical forms that mimic the twirling motions of the invisible weather they aim to imitate.

“The method that I use is basket weaving because basket weaving is a very simple three dimensional grid that I can use to translate data with,” said Miebach. “Everything in the sculpture, whether it is a colorful bead, a string, whether it’s a dowel or reed, represents a different data point. Nothing is put on there for purely aesthetic reasons.”

The Boston artist discovered this process while simultaneously taking an astronomy class at Harvard and learning basket weaving as an extracurricular activity. She yearned for a way to physically display the data she was learning about in class, and thus her 3D scientific models were born. In a field where one is not able to see the data they collect, her sculptures give a form to that which was previously only able to be felt, tasted, and smelled.

Not only do her pieces serve as aesthetic objects, but readable sources of concrete data. “It is important for me that these pieces are actually very accurate because I want them to live in the science world as much as in the sculpture or craft world,” said Miebach. “I still want you to be able to read the weather off of these sculptures.”

You can learn more about Miebach’s process while taking a peak inside her studio in the video from Great Big Story below:

CaptainTyneNew

“To Captain Billy Tyne and His Crew” (2015)

NoelHurricane

“Hurricane Noel” (2011)

AndreaGailhighres

“The Andrea Gail” (2011)

RoaringWindMIEBACH

“And the Winds Kept Roaring Through the Night” (2011)

1InTheShadowofaGiant1

“In the Shadow of a Giant” (2013)

bie-bach-1

“Hurricane Noel,” 2011.

bie-bach-2

The musical score for “Hurricane Noel.”

 

 



Art Design

This New Cycle and Pedestrian Tunnel in Amsterdam Features an 80,000 Tile Mural Inspired by Cornelis Boumeester

March 17, 2016

Christopher Jobson

tunnel-1

Recently constructed by Benthem Crouwel, this expansive new pedestrian and cycling tunnel in Amsterdam features a fantastic tile mural depicting a fleet of ships in rough seas. The 361-foot path called the Cuyperspassage connects the city center to the IJ waterfront and sees some 15,000 commuters daily.

The darker cycling lane incorporates sound-absorbing asphalt and steel grates, while the pedestrian side is almost completely wrapped in a mural of 80,000 delft blue tiles. The artwork was designed by artist Irma Boom, heavily inspired by the work of Dutch tile artist Cornelis Boumeester. The two lanes are further delineated by LEDs to create a safe multi-function corridor with minimal barriers. From Benthem Crouwel:

Along the footpath wall is a tile tableau designed by Irma Boom Office. The design steps off from a restored work by the Rotterdam tile painter Cornelis Boumeester (1652-1733). His tile panel depicting the Warship Rotterdam and the Herring Fleet is in the collection of the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. Irma Boom replaced the original crest on the stern with the Amsterdam coat of arms. The cyclist or pedestrian leaves the old historic part of Amsterdam through Cuyperspassage and heads towards ‘new Amsterdam’ in the north, or vice versa. The tableau fades away towards the IJ-river, the lines of the original work gradually dissolving. Then it builds up again in an abstract form from light to dark blue, as if encouraging cyclists to slow down as the ferry comes into view.

You can see more views and read more about the Cuyperspassage on both Arch Daily and Designboom.

tunnel-2

tunnel-3

tunnel-4

tunnel-5

tunnel-6

tunnel-7

tunnel-8

 

 



Art

Geometric Sculptures Produced From the Immateriality of Light by James Nizam

March 16, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

“Octagram” (2016), 22 aluminum coated mirrors, 22 mirror mounts, programmable lighting elements, haze machine, zero-reflectance-paint, dimensions variable, all images courtesy of James Nizam

James Nizam produces subtle, geometric light installations with programmable lighting elements and mirrors, the resulting pieces looking like snapshots of a strictly choreographed laser light show. In his 2011 series “Thought Forms,” Nizam gained entrance to a domestic structure to install several interventions with daylight entering a darkened room. Through the use of mirrors, he created the complex forms below, resulting in tetrahedrons, stacked triangles, and intersecting rectangles.

Recently, Nizam has added color and moved his light sculptures outdoors, casting a blue triangle of light against a city at night in Visible Horizon and forming a blue and pink 16-sided form in Octagram. No matter the location, Nizam’s pieces give a visually physical presence to the immateriality of light, building forms from literal smoke and mirrors.

Nizam’s work will be featured in the upcoming group exhibition “Lumens,” at the Musée régional de Rimouski in Québec from June 12 through September 25, 2016. (via Booooooom)

“Visible Horizon” (2015), lightjet print, print dimensions variable

“3 Movements Inscribing an Octagram” (2016), lightjet print, each 40 x 50 inches

“Nested Polyhedra” (2014), archival pigment print, print dimensions variable

“Thought Form (Icosahedron)” (2014), archival pigment print, 60 x 48 inches

“Thought Form (Fold)” (2011), archival pigment print, print dimensions variable

“Thought Form (Fan)” (2011), archival pigment print, print dimensions variable

“Thought Form (Dart)” (2011), archival pigment print, print dimensions variable

“Thought Form (Tetrahedron)” (2011), archival pigment print, print dimensions variable

 

 



Art Design

Okuda San Miguel Wraps a Moroccan Church in a Vibrant Geometric Mural

March 15, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

Okuda_15

All images courtesy of Ink and Movement

After covering a church turned skatepark in Spain with his signature style of murals, Okuda San Miguel (previously) has now transformed an abandoned Moroccan church into a 360-degree mural titled “11 Mirages to Freedom.” The street artist covered the structure in geometric bears, birds, and human faces, produced as a part of the British Council‘s Street Art Caravane Initiative. Working with the architecture already in place, San Miguel painted each of the building’s eleven faces while incorporating the structure’s barred windows. These he formed into bird cages, hats, and masks that are seamlessly incorporated…as long as you don’t look into the barred openings.

The church is uniformly painted in a brilliant shade of yellow, with smaller architectural details painted in equally vibrant colors. You can see more of San Miguel’s murals in the video Infinite World included below, as well as on the artist’s Instagram. (via Web Urbanist)

Okuda_03

Okuda_01

Okuda_11

Okuda_07

Okuda_09

Okuda_04

Okuda_08

Okuda_05

Okuda_12

Okuda_06

Okuda_14

Okuda_13

 

 



Art

Ghostly Portraits Painted Onto Layers of Netting by Uttaporn Nimmalaikaew

March 14, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

Uttaporn_Detail_01

“Nostalgic” (2014), translucent fabric, wooden bed, size is not fixed, all images courtesy of Uttaporn Nimmalaikaew

Thai artist Uttaporn Nimmalaikaew paints portraits on layers of fine netting or tulle, deftly producing an analog 3D effect with subjects who appear to be sitting in chairs or lying down on beds. When circling the paintings they morph and shift, changing form depending on the viewer’s distance and location to the piece. These subjects are often his family, a way for the artist to pause his loved ones’ aging process and preserve them in time.

Nimmalaikaew first discovered the technique while a student at Silpakorn University in Bangkok after a stray speck of paint landed on a mosquito net in his studio. Witnessing the dimensionality the surface afforded the paint, he began to explore new ways in which to paint on the utilitarian material.

For each piece Nimmalaikaew begins with a digital drawing which he then prints life-size to determine the subject’s form and texture. He then begins to paint the layers with oil paint in a style that he calls “tulle-painting style.” In an 2014 interview he explained, “Over time, I have learnt that the tulle demands a different way of creating realistic light and shadow for the material. The top layer gives details for the optical illusion. Then I connect each layer with clear copolymer line to make it all fit together and create depth in the image.”

You can see more of the 33-year-old artist’s work on Yavus Gallery or the artist’s Facebook. (via Juxtapoz and Booooooom)

Uttaporn_05

”Nostalgic” (2014), translucent fabric, wooden bed, size is not fixed

Uttaporn_04

”Nostalgic” (2014), translucent fabric, wooden bed, size is not fixed

Uttaporn_08

Uttaporn_07

Uttaporn_10

Uttaporn_Detail_02

Uttaporn_03

“My Buddhist saint (My Dad)” (2015)

Uttaporn_02

“My Buddhist saint (My Dad)” (2015)