Category: Art

New Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted with a Bandsaw by James McNabb 

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Aurelie Laurent/Petit Jules Photos

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Aurelie Laurent/Petit Jules Photos

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Aurelie Laurent/Petit Jules Photos

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Aurelie Laurent/Petit Jules Photos

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Aurelie Laurent/Petit Jules Photos

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Aurelie Laurent/Petit Jules Photos

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Aurelie Laurent/Petit Jules Photos

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Aurelie Laurent/Petit Jules Photos

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Aurelie Laurent/Petit Jules Photos

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Aurelie Laurent/Petit Jules Photos

Furniture-maker-turned-sculptor James McNabb (previously) just opened a new exhibition of work titled Metros at Robert Fontaine Gallery in Miami. McNabb continues his exploration of architectural shapes using an improvised form of woodworking frequently described as “sketching with a bandsaw.” Without regard to the design or stability a true architect might utilize, he instead works with more abstract shapes cut from repurposed and exotic woods which in turn become component pieces for larger sculptures resembling wheels or tables. McNabb shares via email:

I compare hyperrealistic painting to fine woodworking. Both are slow, tedious, detail oriented process that require great care and consideration through every stage of making. In contrast, I compare my style of rapid bandsaw mark making to the fast paced nature of spray can art. It’s my attempt at “urban woodworking”.

Metros will be on view through October 28, 2014 and you can see more of McNabb’s recent work right here.

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Dizzying New Wind-Powered Kinetic Sculptures by Anthony Howe 

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Kinetic sculptor Anthony Howe (previously) has created a number of new kinetic artworks since we featured his work here last year. The artist works with specialized software to first mockup each piece digitally before fabricating the individual components from metal. The motion you see is generated completely by the wind, with even the slightest breeze setting the dozens of rotating components in action. You can see more of his recent work on his YouTube channel.

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A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four ‘Hidden’ Anamorphic Paintings 

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Emulsifier is a curious glass sculpture designed by artist Thomas Medicus. The piece is built from 160 glass strips that are hand-painted on four sides with complimentary images. Only when the object is rotated and viewed from the right angle do the images appear. Watch the video above to see how it works.

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Artist Carol Milne Knits with Glass 

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When first contemplating these glass sculptures by Seattle-based artist Carol Milne, your imagination runs wild trying to figure out how she does it. Glass has a melting point of around 1,500°F (815°C), so how could it possibly manipulated into neatly organized yarn-like strands that are looped around knitting needles. The answer lies in a technique invented by Milne in 2006 that involves aspects of knitting, lost-wax casting, mold-making, and kiln-casting.

First, a model of the sculpture is made from wax which is then encased by a refractory mold material that can withstand extremely high temperatures. Next, hot steam is used to melt the wax, leaving behind an empty cavity in the shape of the artwork. Pieces of room temperature glass are then placed inside the mold which is then heated to 1,400-1,600 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the type of glass. Afterward, the piece is slowly cooled over a period of several weeks, followed by a careful excavation process, where Milne delicately chips away like an archaeologist to reveal the final piece.

You can see much more of Milne’s work at the Glass Art Society, on Facebook, and in her online gallery. (via Lustik)

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Forms of Nature Created from Thousands of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled 

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Pair by the sea. Porcelain shards, fired clay.

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Pair by the sea. Porcelain shards, fired clay.

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Pair by the sea. Porcelain shards, fired clay.

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Blue & White porcelain shards flower. No.1, 2014. Porcelain shards, fired clay.

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Blue & White porcelain shards flower. No.1, 2014. Porcelain shards, fired clay.

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Blue & White porcelain shards flower. No.2, 2014.
Porcelain shards, fired clay.

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Blue & White porcelain shards flower. No.3, 2014. Porcelain shards, fired clay.

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Israeli artist Zemer Peled explores both the beauty and brutality of nature with sculptures constructed from ceramic shards. The pieces billow and bloom like flowers or sea creatures, taking color from Peled’s use of blue cobalt found in designs and landscapes used in traditional Japanese pottery. The artist uses a slab roller to build sheets of clay which are fired and then smashed to pieces with a hammer, providing a contrast between smooth and soft materials that go into each piece.

Peled was recently shortlisted for the Young Masters Art Prize which opens today Sphinx Fine Art in London, and she’s currently a long term resident at the Archie Bray Foundation. You can see much more of her work in her portfolio.

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Regular Division: A Hypnotic Video Collage Merging Classical Oil Painting and Greenhouses 

You can safely file this video titled Regular Division from artist Joe Hamilton under I don’t know what it is but I like it. One way to explain it would be a collaged cinematic journey through ornate botanical gardens … augmented with famous oil paintings. Or something? Intrigued, I reached out to Hamilton and he shares a bit via email:

Regular Division is a collaged video loop that was shot and digitally composed on location in Europe, Asia and the Middle East as part of a new series of works looking at landscape. The series responds to the impact of the digital technologies on our representation of landscape and the effect of this on our relationship with landscape.

Regular Division, the first in this series of works, features a spiral of intermingled scenes filmed from inside a number of green houses and domes. An artificial paradise of foliage under a canopy of gridded glass. The video also features high resolution images of brush strokes taken from classical oil paintings bridging a connection to the traditional medium that has played such an important role in the representation of landscape in the past.

The piece is currently on view at Pablo’s Birthday Gallery in New York as part of the group show ‘Like New Landscape’ curated by Front Company. (via Booooooom)

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