Category: Art

Whimsical New Murals by Ernest Zacharevic Play with Their Surroundings on the Streets of Malaysia

Whimsical New Murals by Ernest Zacharevic Play with Their Surroundings on the Streets of Malaysia street art murals Malaysia

Whimsical New Murals by Ernest Zacharevic Play with Their Surroundings on the Streets of Malaysia street art murals Malaysia

Whimsical New Murals by Ernest Zacharevic Play with Their Surroundings on the Streets of Malaysia street art murals Malaysia
Kuching, Borneo, Malaysia

Whimsical New Murals by Ernest Zacharevic Play with Their Surroundings on the Streets of Malaysia street art murals Malaysia
Johor Bahru, Malaysia

Whimsical New Murals by Ernest Zacharevic Play with Their Surroundings on the Streets of Malaysia street art murals Malaysia
Johor Bahru, Malaysia

Whimsical New Murals by Ernest Zacharevic Play with Their Surroundings on the Streets of Malaysia street art murals Malaysia

Whimsical New Murals by Ernest Zacharevic Play with Their Surroundings on the Streets of Malaysia street art murals Malaysia

Artist Ernest Zacharevic (previously) has been quite busy the last few months with stops in Italy and locations around Malaysia where he just finished a month-long residency in Ipoh. He completed several large murals depicting locals and their way of life, but also painted a few of his signature pieces that humorously depict children or animals interacting with elements of buildings or other nearby objects. Above is a collection of pieces stretching back to December of 2013, but for more of his recent work in Malaysia head over to Arrested Motion.

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Painted Typography by Pawel Nolbert

Painted Typography by Pawel Nolbert typography posters and prints paint illustration digital

Painted Typography by Pawel Nolbert typography posters and prints paint illustration digital

Painted Typography by Pawel Nolbert typography posters and prints paint illustration digital

Painted Typography by Pawel Nolbert typography posters and prints paint illustration digital

Painted Typography by Pawel Nolbert typography posters and prints paint illustration digital

Painted Typography by Pawel Nolbert typography posters and prints paint illustration digital

Painted Typography by Pawel Nolbert typography posters and prints paint illustration digital

Painted Typography by Pawel Nolbert typography posters and prints paint illustration digital

This interesting blend of paint and typography by Warsaw-based designer Pawel Nolbert was created by photographing actual paint splatters and merging them with digital illustration techniques. Titled Atypical, he describes the series of posters as an exploration of the form and rhythm of letterforms “presented as half-realistic, half-illustrative figurative sculptures.” You can see more on his website, and prints are available on Society6. (via Illusion)

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People Skewered with Geometric Shapes by Aakash Nihalani

People Skewered with Geometric Shapes by Aakash Nihalani tape street art geometric

People Skewered with Geometric Shapes by Aakash Nihalani tape street art geometric

People Skewered with Geometric Shapes by Aakash Nihalani tape street art geometric

People Skewered with Geometric Shapes by Aakash Nihalani tape street art geometric

People Skewered with Geometric Shapes by Aakash Nihalani tape street art geometric

People Skewered with Geometric Shapes by Aakash Nihalani tape street art geometric

People Skewered with Geometric Shapes by Aakash Nihalani tape street art geometric

A number of new works today from artist Aakash Nihalani (previously) who has been skewering subjects in Brooklyn with his geometric figures made from neon tape as part of a new body of work called Landline. You can follow the artist’s newest work on his blog Eye Scream Sunday.

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Colorful Liquid Splashes Captured at 1/3500th of a Second Look Like Floating Sculptures

Colorful Liquid Splashes Captured at 1/3500th of a Second Look Like Floating Sculptures high speed

Colorful Liquid Splashes Captured at 1/3500th of a Second Look Like Floating Sculptures high speed

Colorful Liquid Splashes Captured at 1/3500th of a Second Look Like Floating Sculptures high speed

Colorful Liquid Splashes Captured at 1/3500th of a Second Look Like Floating Sculptures high speed

Colorful Liquid Splashes Captured at 1/3500th of a Second Look Like Floating Sculptures high speed

Colorful Liquid Splashes Captured at 1/3500th of a Second Look Like Floating Sculptures high speed

Colorful Liquid Splashes Captured at 1/3500th of a Second Look Like Floating Sculptures high speed

Colorful Liquid Splashes Captured at 1/3500th of a Second Look Like Floating Sculptures high speed

Colorful Liquid Splashes Captured at 1/3500th of a Second Look Like Floating Sculptures high speed

Colorful Liquid Splashes Captured at 1/3500th of a Second Look Like Floating Sculptures high speed

Cassandra Warner and Jeremy Floto of Floto+Warner Studio recently produced this beautiful series of photos titled Clourant that seemingly turns large splashes of colorful liquid into glistening sculptures that hover in midair. The photos were shot at a speed of 1/3,500th of a second, taking special care to disguise the origin of each burst making images appear almost digital in nature (the duo assures no Photoshop was used). They share about the project:

Colourant is a series of events that pass you by as an imperceptible flash. A fleeting moment, that blocks and obscures the landscape, a momentary graffiti of air and space. Creating shapes of nature not experienced by the human eye, these short-lived anomalies are frozen for us to view at 3500th of a second. Transforming the non-discernible and ephemeral to the eternal. The essence of photography—immortalize the transitory.

You can see several additional shots from the series on their website and prints are available through Vaughan Hannigan. If you liked this you can check out similar high-speed liquid works by Manon Wethly, Fabian Oefner, and Shinichi Maruyama.

Update: For those curious, the artists share via email that the colors/liquids used in the photographs are “non toxic and water based.”

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Art Meets Mathematics: Dizzying Geometric GIFs by David Whyte

Art Meets Mathematics: Dizzying Geometric GIFs by David Whyte gifs geometric animation

Art Meets Mathematics: Dizzying Geometric GIFs by David Whyte gifs geometric animation

Art Meets Mathematics: Dizzying Geometric GIFs by David Whyte gifs geometric animation

Art Meets Mathematics: Dizzying Geometric GIFs by David Whyte gifs geometric animation

Art Meets Mathematics: Dizzying Geometric GIFs by David Whyte gifs geometric animation

Art Meets Mathematics: Dizzying Geometric GIFs by David Whyte gifs geometric animation

Art Meets Mathematics: Dizzying Geometric GIFs by David Whyte gifs geometric animation

Art Meets Mathematics: Dizzying Geometric GIFs by David Whyte gifs geometric animation

Art Meets Mathematics: Dizzying Geometric GIFs by David Whyte gifs geometric animation

In 2011, Dublin-based physics student David Whyte began a Tumblr called Bees & Bombs where he posted humorous images and quirky GIFs of his own creation, borrowing heavily from videos and pop culture icons. One day he decided to start playing with Processing, a popular open source programming language designed to help create images, animation, and various computer interactions. His background in mathematics and physics greatly enhanced his understanding of motion and geometry and it wasn’t long before he was churning out some of the most popular animations shared on Tumblr.

Whyte’s minimalistic use of shapes and color places an increased emphasis on motion, and leaves one somewhat dumbstruck at how he conceives of each image. In a somewhat rare move he happens to be quite open about his methods and frequently posts source code and tips to help other artists. See much more of his work on Bees & Bombs.

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5,000 Arms to Hold You: Climb Mike and Doug Starn’s Largest Bamboo Construction Ever at the Israel Museum

5,000 Arms to Hold You: Climb Mike and Doug Starns Largest Bamboo Construction Ever at the Israel Museum Israel installation bamboo architecture
Photo by Eli Posner, Israel Museum

5,000 Arms to Hold You: Climb Mike and Doug Starns Largest Bamboo Construction Ever at the Israel Museum Israel installation bamboo architecture

5,000 Arms to Hold You: Climb Mike and Doug Starns Largest Bamboo Construction Ever at the Israel Museum Israel installation bamboo architecture
Photo by Eli Posner, Israel Museum

5,000 Arms to Hold You: Climb Mike and Doug Starns Largest Bamboo Construction Ever at the Israel Museum Israel installation bamboo architecture

5,000 Arms to Hold You: Climb Mike and Doug Starns Largest Bamboo Construction Ever at the Israel Museum Israel installation bamboo architecture

5,000 Arms to Hold You: Climb Mike and Doug Starns Largest Bamboo Construction Ever at the Israel Museum Israel installation bamboo architecture
Photos by Eli Posner, Israel Museum

5,000 Arms to Hold You: Climb Mike and Doug Starns Largest Bamboo Construction Ever at the Israel Museum Israel installation bamboo architecture

5,000 Arms to Hold You: Climb Mike and Doug Starns Largest Bamboo Construction Ever at the Israel Museum Israel installation bamboo architecture

5,000 Arms to Hold You: Climb Mike and Doug Starns Largest Bamboo Construction Ever at the Israel Museum Israel installation bamboo architecture

5,000 Arms to Hold You: Climb Mike and Doug Starns Largest Bamboo Construction Ever at the Israel Museum Israel installation bamboo architecture

Towering 52 feet (16 meters) into the air, 5,000 Arms to Hold You is the latest bamboo installation by artists Doug and Mike Starn at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem. This is the 9th construction in twin brother’s Big Bambú series that seeks to explore how order is created from the chaos of life through elaborate bamboo sculptures. For this new piece the duo worked with a team of mountain climbers to help assemble the precarious form using over 10,000 bamboo poles over a month-long period. It is the largest and most complex sculptural installation they have ever undertaken.

“The concept of Big Bambú has nothing to do with bamboo,” Mike Starn tells the Israel Museum. “Big Bambú represents the invisible architecture of life and living things. It is the random interdependence of moments, trajectories intersecting, and actions becoming interaction, creating growth and change.” “It is philosophic engineering, a demonstration of chaotic interdependence,” adds Doug.

5,000 Arms to Hold You opened to the public on June 16th, and visitors are invited to explore the interactive maze from all angles, including the opportunity to ascend to the very top. You can learn more on the project’s dedicated website, and see many more bamboo installations by the Starn brothers here.

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Modern Ruins: An Artist’s Vehicle Designed to Traverse 9,000 Kilometers of Abandoned Railways in Mexico

Modern Ruins: An Artist’s Vehicle Designed to Traverse 9,000 Kilometers of Abandoned Railways in Mexico travel trains railway Mexico

All images courtesy the artists and the Arts Catalyst

Modern Ruins: An Artist’s Vehicle Designed to Traverse 9,000 Kilometers of Abandoned Railways in Mexico travel trains railway Mexico

Modern Ruins: An Artist’s Vehicle Designed to Traverse 9,000 Kilometers of Abandoned Railways in Mexico travel trains railway Mexico

Modern Ruins: An Artist’s Vehicle Designed to Traverse 9,000 Kilometers of Abandoned Railways in Mexico travel trains railway Mexico

Modern Ruins: An Artist’s Vehicle Designed to Traverse 9,000 Kilometers of Abandoned Railways in Mexico travel trains railway Mexico

Modern Ruins: An Artist’s Vehicle Designed to Traverse 9,000 Kilometers of Abandoned Railways in Mexico travel trains railway Mexico

Modern Ruins: An Artist’s Vehicle Designed to Traverse 9,000 Kilometers of Abandoned Railways in Mexico travel trains railway Mexico

What do you do with the abandoned railways that once held the promise of trans-continental linkage and progress? Some have converted them into tourist-friendly pathways. But Mexican artists and brothers Ivan Puig (previously) and Andrés Padilla Domene decided to traverse the nearly 9,000 km of railway in Mexico and Ecuador that, in 1995, was abandoned and left to decay. But they didn’t travel in any old fashion. In a project that ran from 2010 to 2012 the artists rode in a striking silver road-rail vehicle called SEFT-1, which they designed and built themselves so as to travel both on rail and road.

The multi-year journey, which was documented online, explored abandoned rail but also the notion of modern ruins, and “how the ideology of progress is imprinted onto historic landscapes.” (via Hyperallergic)

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