Category: Art

New ‘Green Giant’ Mural by Blu on the Streets of Naples 

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Street artist Blu was recently spotted in Naples, Italy putting the finishing touches on this giant green prisoner tearing free from his uniform. The unannounced artwork is supposedly an allusion to the building it’s painted on, a former prison site that is being converted into an open community space. As usual, Blu painted the piece entirely by hand, using ropes to dangle from the side of the building without scaffolding or cherry pickers. See more views on StreetArtNews.

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New Snowcapped Mountains and Swirling Vortexes Excavated from Vintage Books by Guy Laramée 

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“V” (2015) Carved book, inks, pigments, wax. 11,5 x 9 x 5 inches. Photo Alain Lefort.

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“V” (2015) Carved book, inks, pigments, wax. 11,5 x 9 x 5 inches. Photo Alain Lefort.

Continuing to amaze us with his elaborate dictionary and encyclopedia carvings, Guy Laramée‘s (previously here and here) newest works feature deep caverns and valleys that retreat hundreds of pages down into his excavated books. One in particular, “V,” appears like a snowcapped vortex circling down into an endless pit. Viewing this piece, or any of his mountainous works, it’s hard to imagine that their material is stacked and sandblasted paper, the sheets presented more like layers of earth than printed definitions.

Laramée chooses to carve into sources of reference as a conceptual nod to the erosion of cultures, a theme that has pervaded the last 25 years of his practice. “Cultures emerge, become obsolete, and are replaced by new ones,” Laramée’s artist statement explains. “With the vanishing of cultures, some people are displaced and destroyed. We are currently told that the paper book is bound to die. The library, as a place, is finished. One might ask, so what?”

His works attempt to showcase how increasing knowledge might actually be an erosion rather than accumulation by altering these previous beacons of information. They are now integrated into our digital systems, and their husks transformed into mountains and valleys.

You can see more of Laramée’s carved and painted books at JHB Gallery in New York City and Foster/White Gallery in Seattle.

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“V” (2015) Carved book, inks, pigments, wax. 11,5 x 9 x 5 inches. Photo Alain Lefort.

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“V” (2015) Carved book, inks, pigments, wax. 11,5 x 9 x 5 inches. Photo Alain Lefort.

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“Irazu” (2015) Carved book, inks, pigments, wax. 11,5 x 9 x 5 (h) inches. Photo Alain Lefort.

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“Irazu” (2015) Carved book, inks, pigments, wax. 11,5 x 9 x 5 (h) inches. Photo Alain Lefort.

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“Le Début” (2016) Carved book, inks, pigments, wax. 12 x 9 x 5 (h) inches. Photo Alain Lefort.

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“Le Début” (2016) Carved book, inks, pigments, wax. 12 x 9 x 5 (h) inches. Photo Alain Lefort.

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“DESERT OF UNKNOWING” (2016) Carved books, inks, pigments. 39 x 11,5 x 5 inches. Photo Alain Lefort

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“DESERT OF UNKNOWING” (2016) Carved books, inks, pigments. 39 x 11,5 x 5 inches. Photo Alain Lefort

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“DESERT OF UNKNOWING” (2016) Carved books, inks, pigments. 39 x 11,5 x 5 inches. Photo Alain Lefort

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New Spray Painted Tile Floor Patterns in Abandoned Spaces by Javier De Riba 

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Instead of competing with giant graffiti tags or wall murals, Spanish artist Javier De Riba (previously) takes an entirely different approach with his spray painted street art. Utilizing carefully overlapped stencil sets, Riba creates pristine sections of tile floor patterns in the midst of cracked sidewalks or on the floors of abandoned buildings. His measured use of color, original geometric arrangements, and precise execution makes every artwork stand out, no matter how mundane the location.

Riba has also begun working with wood varnish to create similar geometric shapes and produced limited edition spray prints of his most recognizable patterns. You can follow his work on Facebook and on Behance.

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Otherworldly Metal Organisms Welded by Mylinh Nguyen 

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Inspired by animalistic forms both living and extinct, artist Mylinh Nguyen welds alien creatures from brass, bronze, and silver. Using a variety of machining techniques each creature takes form over several weeks, originating first as haphazard sketches in a notebook before evolving into permanent metal forms. Nguyen is a master of articulating even the most minute skeletal details of imaginary beings with metal, such as her seed-pod-meets-jellyfish series Meduses or her 2012 series of aquatic life, Sous-Marins. Nguyen currently has several pieces on view at the Les 3 CHA centre d’art in Châteaugiron, France. (via Lustik)

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The Delicate Floral Wax Sculptures and Laser Cut Paintings of Valerie Hammond 

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“Transition II” (2008), wax, silk and wire, 20x5x6″, courtesy of the artist and Littlejohn Contemporary, New York

Valerie Hammond imbues a delicate understanding of each material she works with, whether it’s sculpting flowers and hands from wax or laser cutting large outlines of women onto watercolor paper. Focused on the poetics of each work she produces, details are found not only on the pieces she creates, but the way they cast shadows onto the wall or rest atop a gallery plinth. Her piece “Girl” projects a poem by Emily Dickinson when pinned against the wall, doubling the work’s message in its own shadow.

Hammond received her MFA from the University of California at Berkley, and currently lives and works in New York City. Her work is included in public and private collections such as the Walker Art Center, The Library of Congress, the New York Public Library’s Print and Drawing Collection, the Getty Museum, the Grand Palais Museum, and many more. Hammond is represented by Littlejohn Contemporary in New York City.

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“Rose (Murmur)” (2011), wax, silk and wire, 10x8x5″, courtesy of the artist and Littlejohn Contemporary, New York

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“Girl” (2013), archival print on watercolor paper digitally laser cut, 31 ¼” x 13″, courtesy of the artist and Littlejohn Contemporary, New York

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“Girl” (2013), archival print on watercolor paper digitally laser cut, 31 ¼” x 13″, courtesy of the artist and Littlejohn Contemporary, New York

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“Forest Girl (What I see not, I better see)” (2008), edition variable of 5, laser-cut digital print, 31″ x 13 1/4″, courtesy of the artist and Littlejohn Contemporary, New York

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Image via Art is a Way

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Image via Art is a Way

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Image via Art is a Way

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