Art

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Art

New Hand-Painted Persian Carpets With Vibrantly Hued Details by Jason Seife

December 28, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

With a steady hand and several fine-point brushes, Miami-based artist Jason Seife (previously) produces paintings that mimic the ornate patterns found in Persian carpets. Seife presents the same geometric symmetry seen in historic designs, yet takes his own liberties with the colors of ink and acrylic paint chosen for each work. The vibrant hues selected are not ones traditionally found in Persian textiles, but are his way to imbue his own state of mind into each piece.

Seife is currently represented by Robert Fontaine Gallery. You can see more of his carpet-based paintings on Instagram. (via Booooooom)

 

 



Art

Step Inside a Swirling Mirror Room of Interactive Ocean Vortices by teamLab

December 28, 2017

Christopher Jobson

For their latest dizzying interactive installation, Japanese collective teamLab (previously) brought the ocean indoors, creating a projected environment that reacts to the movements of visitors, all encased within the infinite space of a mirror room. Titled “Moving Creates Vortices and Vortices Create Movement” the work is inspired in part by the life cycle of the ocean, particularly the movement of plankton as represented by the reactive particle effects that spin like whirlpools as you pass through the exhibition space. The speed and direction of people’s movements are all factored into the projections and in the absence of motion the room gradually reverts to darkness.

The Vortices installation just opened at the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne, Australia where it will remain on view through April 15, 2018. You can learn more on teamLab’s website. (via Designboom)

All images © teamLab.

 

 



Art Dance

Hundreds of Swinging Pendulums Subtly Choreograph Visitors’ Movements at the Paris Autumn Festival

December 27, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Hundreds of pendulums swing through Paris’ Grande halle de la Villette for choreographer and artist William Forsythe‘s installation Nowhere and Everywhere at the Same Time No. 2. The hanging plumbobs sway together in a series of timed sequences, which force visitors into choreographed movements as they avoid the ceiling-mounted works.

“The spectators are free to attempt a navigation of this statistically unpredictable environment, but are requested to avoid coming in contact with any of the swinging pendulums,” says an artist statement regarding Forsythe’s choreographic object. “This task, which automatically intimates and alerts the spectators innate predictive faculties, produces a lively choreography of manifold and intricate avoidance strategies.”

The work has previously been installed at the Circus Street Market as part of the Brighton Festival, the Turbine Hall of the Tate Modern, the Arsenale of the Venice Biennale, and will be displayed at la Grande halle de La Villette for le Festival d’Automne à Paris through December 31, 2017. You can see footage from an iteration of the installation at the Museum Folkwang in Essen, Germany in the video above. (via The Kid Should See This)

@audre.l

Image via @audre.l

Image via @tam_qubiqstudio

Image via @tam_qubiqstudio

Image via @_cedric_v

Image via @_cedric_v

Image via @ziyue_j

Image via @ziyue_j

Image via @studiomm_paris

Image via @studiomm_paris

 

 



Art

New Sculptures by Ben Young Transform Hand-Cut Glass into Aquatic Landscapes

December 21, 2017

Laura Staugaitis


Ben Young (previously here) continues to use exquisite manual techniques to transform sheets of glass into luminous sculptures that give a glimpse into a moment in time or space. The artist envisions, hand-cuts, and carefully constructs layers of glass to evoke water, often offset with organically-shaped concrete topography, as well as metal details like a diver, lighthouse, or sailboat. Young, who is based in New Zealand, describes his latest body of work on his website:

Sentiments of the Sublime explores the nostalgic many and collective perspectives of the relationship between man and nature. In creating work, by hand, that makes reference to the myriad of perspectives and experiences of others, Young’s work is both deeply personal to the viewer and at the same time exploring subject matter that is universal, connecting Young, his work and his viewers in a moment of awe and nostalgia.

Young recently had his first solo show at REDSEA Gallery in Singapore, and currently has a piece, At The Helm, on view at Black Door Gallery in Aukland. Young also offers prints of his sculptures and shares updates on his work via BehanceFacebook, and Instagram.

 

 



Art

Monumental Aged Wood Constructions by Leonardo Drew

December 21, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Leonardo Drew is an artist known for his large wall-mounted sculptures composed of jagged tree trunks layered with thousands of segments of cut wood. The monumental installations perform as abstracted landscapes, which undulate and retract through a combination of natural and man-made shapes.

Although typically monochromatic, the works vary in color depending on how extensively Drew chooses to alter the material’s exterior. In some works the wood is stark black, while in others the light wood appears relatively untreated.

“By manipulating the wood and other objects to weather and age them, Drew’s awe-inspiring sculptures reveal the artist’s intense attention to shaping, cutting, building, and working his pieces through his own material language,” explains a press release for Drew’s eponymous solo exhibition at Talley Dunn Gallery this past fall. “These densely stacked and layered sculptures activate the spaces in which they occupy with a dynamic presence whereby complexity and simplicity coexist.”

Drew’s work has been exhibited in numerous solo exhibitions, including The Hirschhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC, the Royal Hibernian Academy in Dublin, Ireland, The Art Institute of Chicago, The Miami Art Museum, and the St. Louis Art Museum. He has also collaborated with the Merce Cunningham Dance Company, and has participated in artist residencies at ArtPace, San Antonio and The Studio Museum of Harlem in New York City.

Recently Drew produced an installation for San Francisco’s de Young Museum titled Number 197, a work which responded to the institution’s unique architecture by spanning three walls of its atrium. This fall he also exhibited at Talley Dunn Gallery in Dallas, Texas where his solo exhibition Leonardo Drew was on view through December 16.

 

 



Art

Mother Earth and Her Daughter Meet in a Mural by Jess X. Snow

December 20, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

A new mural in Philadelphia by Jess X. Snow depicts two abstracted female figures, one young, and one old, both formed of rippling branches, leaves, flowers, and birds in flight. Entitled “A Daughter Migrates Toward The Mother Earth,” the mural was created with the support of public art nonprofit Mural Arts Philadelphia.

In addition to mural-making, Snow is also a poet, filmmaker, and educator. Snow describes her multi-disciplinary work as exploring “survival, joy, and our relationship to the Earth by amplifying the voices of those who refuse to be defined by borders, heteronormativity, gender, color, legislation and time.” You can follow her work and travels on Instagram and Twitter. Snow also designed a screen print with similar imagery available through Justseeds.

 

 



Art

Intimately Cupped Hands Cast Inside Clay Bricks by Dan Stockholm

December 20, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

By Hand is one of several pieces by Dan Stockholm that explores the process of making an object by capturing its performative actions within the work. For this particular installation Stockholm placed negative plaster casts of his cupped hands into a series of red clay bricks that vary in how much they reveal. Some objects showcase both hands, while others only hint to a sliver of a finger or palm.

The positions of the cupped hands mimic gestures Stockholm made during a 2013 performance in which he touched every inch of his father’s house after his death. The intimate moments now embody their own structure, the abstract shape of his father’s home reincarnated through gesture.

The work was exhibited at Künstlerhaus Bethanien last spring for his solo exhibition HOUSE. You can view more of Stockholm’s sculptural works on his website.