Category: Art

The Absurdly Elongated Sculptural Objects of the Dufala Brothers 

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Special Air Mission 2800

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Lock and Key, 2010. Master locks, brass. Photo by Claire Iltis.

The Dufala Brothers have a knack for the surreal, creating modern objects that have been elongated and stretched into abstract versions of shoes, household appliances, and tools. The creative works mimic the original objects so well that it is difficult to separate the two in one’s mind, such as a Chuck Taylor that is made so long it folds on top of oneself, and a lock made for a key that is four times the standard size.

The Philadelphia duo explore this exaggerated scale with humor, utilizing a variety of media such as sculpture, theater, performance, digital media, and drawing in their combined practice. Both graduated from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and are represented by Fleisher/Ollman Gallery in Philadelphia where they currently reside. You can see more of the pair’s absurd works on their website. (via postmodern.jpg & thnx, Tim!)

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Step Broom

Special Air Mission 2800, 2009. Rubber, vinyl, shoelaces. 6 x 4 x 32"

Special Air Mission 2800, 2009. Rubber, vinyl, shoelaces. 6 x 4 x 32″

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Hammer with Oversized Handle

Hammer with Oversized Handle

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Artists Turn Their Palettes into Paintings for the Exhibition “Point of Origin” 

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Denis Sarazhin

After completing a series of miniature paintings two years ago, Dina Brodsky (previously) turned to her palette, experimenting with the tool of the series’ creation until it became a work of its own. During a studio visit with a friend she noticed he too had created a work on an old palette, however the work was far different than her own. This discovery led Brodsky to investigate other artists’ palettes and how they might manipulate them into works, inviting both friends and strangers to experiment with their palettes.

“Everyone I asked made a phenomenal painting, and because they were sharing the images on social media, a few other artists asked if they could participate,” said Brodsky to Colossal. “It grew from there, almost like a conversation that was happening via palette paintings and social media amongst artists all over the globe.”

The rapid expansion of palettes has even led to an antique 19th century palette from Spain, which Brodsky believes to be a sketch from Luis Pidal Menendez, a 19th century painter from Barcelona. This historic painting, as well as 51 other works from Brodsky’s friends and larger artist community, will be on display at The Lodge Gallery in New York City in an exhibition titled Point of Origin from October 13 to November 13, 2016. The exhibition is curated by Brodsky and curator Trek Lexington.

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James Adelman

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Alonsa Guevara

Dina Brodsky in progress

Dina Brodsky in progress

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Christian Fagerlund

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Joshua Henderson

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Amber Lia-Kloppel

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Tim Lowly

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A Virtual Reality Sky Projected Above a Parisian Church by Artist Miguel Chevalier 

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Projected onto the ceiling of Saint-Eustache Church in Paris, Voûtes Célestes is a work by Miguel Chevalier that turned the ancient chapel into the backdrop for a constantly morphing sky chart produced in real time. Cycling through 35 different colored networks, the ceiling glowed with each successive pattern, highlighting the grand architecture that laid below the swirling universes above.

The work, accompanied by musical improvisations played by Baptiste-Florian Marle-Ouvrard on the organ, was produced for Nuit Blanche 2016 on the first of October. Visitors to the virtual reality artwork were invited to wander or lie down beneath the false sky above, aesthetically immersed in a wash of sonic and visual splendor.

Chevalier was born in Mexico City in 1959 and has lived in Paris since 1985. His work has focused almost exclusively on the digital since the late 1970s, often combining themes such as nature and artifice. You can see a more of his work on his website, and a video of his Paris installation below. (via designboom)

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New Anatomical Specimens Made from Hand-Dyed Wool and Silk by Lana Crooks 

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Tricking the eye to view textile as bone, Lana Crooks (previously) works with bits of hand-dyed wool and silk to recreate the sun-drenched skeletons of snakes, birds, and humans, displaying them each in bell jars. She considers he works “faux specimens” as her delicate sculptures blend science, art, and fantasy. Often her inspirations come from books as well as real specimens, like the ones found in the back rooms of Chicago’s Field Museum of Natural History.

Crooks curated the group exhibition All That Remains, where her work can also be seen, at the Stranger Factory in Albuquerque, New Mexico. She also has an upcoming two-person exhibition at the Chicago-based Rotofugi titled Night Fall, which opens December 9th, 2016. You can see more of her textile skeletons on her Facebook and Instagram. (via Hi-Fructose)

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Taxidermy Renderings of Dr. Seuss’ Fantastical Beings 

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Smiling goofily from their wooden mounts sit the imaginings of Dr. Seuss, animals with bizarre names like the Turtle-Necked Sea-Turtle, Two Horned Douberhannis, and Semi-Normal Green-Lidded Fawn. The beasts were not designed by fanatics of Dr. Seuss’ famous children’s books, but are based on works created by the man himself over 80 years ago, each originating from an obscure collection of paintings, drawings, and sculpture known as The Secret Art of Dr. Seuss Collection.

These particular sculptures are resin casts adapted from Theodor Seuss Geisel’s (aka Dr. Seuss) Collection of Unorthodox Taxidermy. The original works utilized actual remains of lions, rabbits, and deer that died at the Springfield Zoo where his father was a director. Geisel used these ears, antlers, and shells to form realistic copies of his 2D fictional characters and asked his wife Audrey Geisel to wait until after this death to reveal his works to the public. Audrey stayed true to his wish and waited until 1997, six years after his death, to begin commissioning the sculptures.

The 3D doppelgängers, part of a traveling exhibition titled If I Ran the Zoo, each bear a posthumously printed or engraved signature by the late artist, commissioned specifically by the Dr. Seuss Estate. The exhibition of 17 sculptures in their entirety along with rare paintings and drawings will be on view at LaMantia Gallery in Northport, New York from November 12-27, 2016. The exhibition is timed with the release of the Powerless Puffer, the final cast resin sculpture in the series. (via The Creators Project)

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Miniature Pen & Ink Drawings of the Midwest by Taylor Mazer 

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Michigan artist Taylor Mazer renders the seemingly mundane world of empty alleyways and nondescript buildings of the midwest in excruciating detail on a canvas scarcely larger than a few postage stamps. Working with a fine Micron pen he constructs old buildings brick by brick and casts entire drawings in deep shadow, forcing the viewer to explore the piece up-close to discover every minute detail. The cityscapes are devoid of people, instead focusing on architectural details, light, and the unknown forces—weather or otherwise—that force people indoors, or away altogether.

Mazer works as a freelance illustrator and artist and is currently adjunct faculty at Kendall College of Art and Design in Grand Rapids. You can see more of his work on Behance or Instagram, and many of his original drawings are available in his shop.

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