Category: Art

Music and Sound Vibrations 3D Printed Into Ceramic Vessels 

SolidVibrations_01

All images via Studio van Broekhoven

Bouncing rhythmically to a deep beat, Studio van Broekhoven’s 3D printer produces ceramic vessels scored by sound. The objects spins as clay is applied in response to the amplified noise, forging visual markings into the clay by way of audio wavelengths. The project, “Solid Vibration” was produced by spatial sound designer Ricky van Broekhoven and designer Olivier van Herpt, who have been co-producing the objects that appear almost like woven baskets.

The project developed out of the collaborators’ combined wish to host Broekhoven’s “noisescapes” as solidified objects that could physically represent his abstract tones. For each of the vessels, a specially constructed speaker rig is mounted below the printing platform to emit a low sound that will influence the printing. “A moment in time, a song, a sound, they can now become objects that encapsulate the moment forever,” explains van Herpt’s website.

You can hear more of van Broekhoven’s work here, while taking a glance at more of van Herpt’s ceramics here. (via The Creator’s Project)

vessel-2

SolidVibrations_04

SolidVibrations_05

SolidVibrations_03

vessel-1

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Shipwrecks and Deep Ocean Scenes Encapsulated Inside Translucent Whale Sculptures 

Whale_02

Image provided by Isana Yamada

Whale_03

Image provided by Isana Yamada

Japanese artist Isana Yamada' s project Samsara is composed of six translucent whales mounted on thin pedestals that give each of the sculptures an illusion of movement. The whales, illuminated from within, provide a window to strange worlds locked inside their resin-coated bodies: churning submarine volcanoes, fluffy white clouds, and even polar bear skeletons that float within. The project, staged at Tokyo University of the Arts, references the circle of existence found in Buddhist traditions with each whale displaying a separate scene. The whale that represents the human dimension contains a sunken sailboat, imagery that symbolizes a difficult voyage or plight.

Yamada’s work will also be shown in an exhibition of sculptural works at the Artcomplex Center of Tokyo from March 1st through 6th. You can see more of his work on his Facebook page here. (via My Modern Met)

Whale_08

Images by @muzintansaki

Whale_05

Image provided by Isana Yamada

Whale_04

Image provided by Isana Yamada

Whale_01

Image provided by Isana Yamada

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

One-of-Kind Wool Rug Artworks by Alexandra Kehayoglou Mimic Rolling Pastures and Mossy Textures 

rug-10

Using scraps leftover thread from her family’s carpet factory in Buenos Aires, artist Alexandra Kehayoglou embarks on a laborious hand-tufting process to fabricate wool carpets and rugs that mimic natural textures like moss, water, trees, and pastures. The carpets balance form and function and can powerfully transform an entire room into a lush meadow dotted with pools of water and tufts of grass. Many of her works even function as part tapestry and flow from walls to floor, or work as covers for chairs or stools.

You can find more of Kehayoglou’s carpet creations on Instagram, Artsy, and on her website. (via Faith is Torment)

rug-12

rug-1

rug-2

rug-3

rug-9

rug-4

rug-5

rug-6

rug-7

rug-8

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Playfully Embroidered X-Ray Film by Matthew Cox 

MatthewCox_05

“Daisy Bracelet” All images provided by Matthew Cox.

Adding a touch of softness to stark images of knees, skulls, and chests, Matthew Cox uses bright thread to embroider on X-ray film. His additions add a playful fiction to the cold reality of the transparent film, giving body parts the faces of Greek gods and limbs of anger-prone superheroes. Each stitch on the medical photograph acts as a line for Cox, a labored drawing produced from vibrant thread.

The Philadelphia-based artist enjoys the contrast of his two chosen materials, redefining each of their roles through their unique combination. “By joining the cold, blue, medically-technical plastic of the X-ray with the colorful, decorative and tactile embroidery thread, each is removed from its original intention and creates a new entity,” said Cox. “Handling these media also gives me an opportunity to comment on the ever-increasing presence of photography in contemporary art by introducing labor over the quick, slickness of film.”

Cox’s will show a selection of his embroidered works this summer at Sweden’s Fiberspace. You can see more of his works on his Instagram here. (via Booooooom)

MatthewCox_14

“Lotus With Butterfly Necklace”

MatthewCox_09

“Wading Knees”

MatthewCox_20

“Avatar #7, Zeus/Hulk”

MatthewCox_08

“Medusa Profile”

MatthewCox_15

“Avatar #2, Minotaur”

MatthewCox_16

“Knee and Daisies”

MatthewCox_13

“Waterproof Watches”

MatthewCox_07

“Lashes and Earrings”

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Architectural Watercolors of a Dreamlike Warsaw by Tytus Brzozowski 

tytus-1

Architect and watercolorist Tytus Brzozowski imagines a dreamlike world where giant structures rest on towering stilts and trains seem to emerge from tunnels in the side of residential buildings. Unusual motifs like dice and teapots dot the landscape (or float through the air), and yet everything seems in its place, a credibility attributed to elements lifted directly from the architecture seen on the streets of Warsaw, Poland. Brzozowski refers to his watercolor paintings as “the city of his dreams,” and just as dreams seem to defy space and time, his paintings bring together elements of the present and past. You can see more of his work on Facebook and many of his pieces are available as prints through Lumarte. (via Colossal Submissions)

tytus-2

tytus-3

tytus-4

tytus-5

tytus-6

tytus-7

tytus-8

tytus-9

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

X-Ray Photographs From the 1930s Expose the Delicate Details of Roses and Lilies 

Tasker_02

“Lotus,” ca. 1930, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 1/4 x 9 1/4 inches. All imagery courtesy Joseph Bellows Gallery.

When selecting flowers we are often first attracted to their vibrant colors, eager to choose a bright orange lily or deep red rose. Dr. Dain L. Tasker, an early 20th century radiologist, was attracted to a different feature of the blooms—their anatomy. Using X-ray film to highlight the soft layering of petals and leaves, Tasker produced ghostly images devoid of color, each image appearing more like an ink drawing than photograph.

Born in 1872 in Beloit, Wisconsin, Tasker was the chief radiologist at the Wilshire Hospital in Los Angeles when radiology was in its first stages of exploration. He first became interested in photography in the 20s, focusing his hobby on landscape and portraiture. It wasn’t until the the 30s that he began to connect his career and hobby, moving his photographic interests to the X-ray machine and singling out flowers from his previously photographed landscape environments.

By composing images with singular flowers Taker examined their individualistic qualities rather than focusing on how they might be found grouped in nature or a bouquet. These minimal compositions contain a romantic appreciation for his subject matter. “Flowers are the expression of the love life of plants,” he said in a statement.

A selection of Tasker’s X-ray images can be seen in the exhibition “Floral Studies” at Joseph Bellows Gallery in La Jolla, California which runs through February 19, 2016. (via Hyperallergic)

Tasker_04

“A Rose,” 1936, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 1/4 x 9 1/8 inches

Tasker_15

“Yellow Calla Lily,” 1938, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 3/8 x 9 1/4 inches

Tasker_14

“untitled, (lily),” 1932, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 1/4 x 9 inches

Tasker_11

“Philodendron,” 1938, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 3/8 x 9 inches

Tasker_10

“Peruvian Daffodil,” 1938, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 1/2 x 9 1/4 inches

Tasker_09

“Fuchsia,” 1938, vintage gelatin silver print, 9 1/2 x 7 1/4 inches

Tasker_06

“Delphinium,” 1938, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 1/4 x 9 1/8 inches

Tasker_01

“Tulip,” 1931, vintage gelatin silver print, 9 x 7 inches

Tasker_03

“California Holly,” 1937, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 3/8 x 9 1/8 inches

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Page 16 of 348«...15161718...»