Category: Art

Digital Papercut Illustrations by Eiko Ojala

Digital Papercut Illustrations by Eiko Ojala paper illustration digital

Digital Papercut Illustrations by Eiko Ojala paper illustration digital

Digital Papercut Illustrations by Eiko Ojala paper illustration digital

Digital Papercut Illustrations by Eiko Ojala paper illustration digital

Digital Papercut Illustrations by Eiko Ojala paper illustration digital

Digital Papercut Illustrations by Eiko Ojala paper illustration digital

Digital Papercut Illustrations by Eiko Ojala paper illustration digital

Digital Papercut Illustrations by Eiko Ojala paper illustration digital

Since our last article on Eiko Ojala (previously) the Estonian graphic designer and illustrator has continued his fantastic three dimensional drawings for leading publications around the world. His process involves a mix of digital illustration, paper textures, and a mix of both real and artificial shadows. Eiko won a 2013 Young Illustrators award and an ADC Young Gun award, and his work has appeared in Wired, the New York Times, the New Yorker, Dwell Magazine and elsewhere. You can see more over on Behance.

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Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life-Sized Dolls

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary
Photo by horiyan

This is one of those things you might never believe if somebody told you, and yet even when faced with the evidence in photos, video, or Google Maps, you find yourself questioning reality (and maybe shaking off a serious case of the heebie jeebies). Welcome to Nagoro, a small village tucked into the valleys of Shikoku, Japan, a place where old residents are being replaced by life-sized dolls.

The work is part of a project by longtime resident and artist Ayano Tsukimi who returned to the village after an 11-year absence to discover many of her old neighbors and friends had left for larger cities or simply passed away. The town itself is dying with a dwindling population of about 35 people.

While gardening one day, Tsukimi constructed a scarecrow in the image of her father and was suddenly struck with the idea to replace other friends and family members with similar dolls. Over 350 dolls and 10 years later, her work continues. She places each doll in a place she feels is important to the memory of that person, so strolling through the down you might discover these inanimate memorials working in fields, fishing in rivers, or passing time in chairs along the road.

Berlin-based filmmaker Fritz Schumann recently visited with the 64-year-old artist and shot the documentary short above. (via Dan Sinker, The Verge)

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Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Two anonymous art students, who go by the moniker dangerdust, have been creating gorgeous hand-lettered and illustrated chalkboards featuring inspiring quotes from literary and public figures. Every Monday a new piece, rendered entirely by chalk, appears on the common chalkboard, only to be ephemerally replaced the following week. “Despite our overwhelming workload at Columbus College of Art & Design we bring it upon ourselves to create a chalkboard every week,” say the two students, explaining the motivation behind their late-night rogue art. Each piece, with its cleverly placed backdrop and bold composition, is as unique as the quote itself. They’re created in one fell swoop, which can take up to 11 hours. Like the students say themselves, “it’s the best form of vandalism.” Even if you’re not a student at their school you can follow their weekly creations on behance or Instagram. (via designboom)

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Photographer Laurent Lavender Plays with the Moon

Photographer Laurent Lavender Plays with the Moon moon conceptual

Photographer Laurent Lavender Plays with the Moon moon conceptual

Photographer Laurent Lavender Plays with the Moon moon conceptual

Photographer Laurent Lavender Plays with the Moon moon conceptual

Photographer Laurent Lavender Plays with the Moon moon conceptual

Photographer Laurent Lavender Plays with the Moon moon conceptual

Photographer Laurent Lavender Plays with the Moon moon conceptual

In his ongoing series of photos titled Moon Games, French photographer Laurent Lavender has subjects play with a rising moon, effectively tansforming it into a balloon, a painting, and even a scoop of ice cream. The dreamlike photos have been turned into a calendar and a (French-only) book of poetry as well as a few other objects. You can see more of his work over on Facebook. (via IFLScience)

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Jaw-Dropping Pen and Ink Cityscapes That Seem to Sprawl into Infinity by Ben Sack

Jaw Dropping Pen and Ink Cityscapes That Seem to Sprawl into Infinity by Ben Sack drawing
A Single Note / 48″ diameter, 150″ (12.5 feet) circumference

Jaw Dropping Pen and Ink Cityscapes That Seem to Sprawl into Infinity by Ben Sack drawing
A Single Note, detail

Jaw Dropping Pen and Ink Cityscapes That Seem to Sprawl into Infinity by Ben Sack drawing
A Single Note, detail

Jaw Dropping Pen and Ink Cityscapes That Seem to Sprawl into Infinity by Ben Sack drawing
A Single Note, detail

Jaw Dropping Pen and Ink Cityscapes That Seem to Sprawl into Infinity by Ben Sack drawing
A Single Note, detail

Jaw Dropping Pen and Ink Cityscapes That Seem to Sprawl into Infinity by Ben Sack drawing
A Single Note, detail

Jaw Dropping Pen and Ink Cityscapes That Seem to Sprawl into Infinity by Ben Sack drawing
A Single Note, detail

Jaw Dropping Pen and Ink Cityscapes That Seem to Sprawl into Infinity by Ben Sack drawing

Jaw Dropping Pen and Ink Cityscapes That Seem to Sprawl into Infinity by Ben Sack drawing

Jaw Dropping Pen and Ink Cityscapes That Seem to Sprawl into Infinity by Ben Sack drawing

Jaw Dropping Pen and Ink Cityscapes That Seem to Sprawl into Infinity by Ben Sack drawing

Jaw Dropping Pen and Ink Cityscapes That Seem to Sprawl into Infinity by Ben Sack drawing

Jaw Dropping Pen and Ink Cityscapes That Seem to Sprawl into Infinity by Ben Sack drawing

Jaw Dropping Pen and Ink Cityscapes That Seem to Sprawl into Infinity by Ben Sack drawing

With meticulous determination and a steady hand, artist Ben Sack picks up a black 0.05 Staedtler pigment liner pen and begins to draw the dense, intricate details of fictional cityscapes: buildings, roads, rivers and bridges. He draws until the ink runs out and picks up another pen. And another. And another. Sapping the ink from dozens of writing utensils until several months later a canvas is complete. His most recent piece, a vast circular drawing titled A Single Note (top), has a 12.5 foot circumference. It staggers the mind.

The architecture found in Sack’s artwork spans centuries, from gothic cathedrals to towering skyscrapers, underpinned by patterns of urban sprawl reminiscent of European cities with a healthy dose of science fiction. If you look carefully you might even recognize a familiar landmark here and there. He shares as his influence some thoughts on “western antiquity”:

Its this sort of image that I think most people, if not all of society have of western antiquity; stainless marble facades, long triumphal avenues, monuments to glory. In actuality, the cities of the past were far from idealistic by todays standards. Yes there was marble, lots of marble, and monuments galore, however these urban centers were huddled together and unless you were considerably wealthy, life in dreamy antiquity was often a heroic struggle. Though the societies of antiquity were bloody, dirty and corrupt the idea of antiquity has come to represent some resounding ideals in present society; democracy, justice, law and order, balance, symmetry. These ideals are now the foundation stones of our own civilization, a civilization that some distant future will perhaps honor as antiquity.

Sack graduated from the Virginia Commonwealth University in 2011 and has since had work numerous solo a group exhibitions, most recently at Ghostprint Gallery. And just this week he returned from a circumnavigation of the globe as part of a residence aboard the m/s Amsterdam. You can see more of his work on his website, and over on Tumblr. Prints are available here. (via Waxy.org, Laughing Squid)

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‘8-Bit Watercolors’ Explore the Intersection of Pop Culture and Retro Video Game Graphics

‘8 Bit Watercolors Explore the Intersection of Pop Culture and Retro Video Game Graphics watercolor pop culture painting
The Kiss

‘8 Bit Watercolors Explore the Intersection of Pop Culture and Retro Video Game Graphics watercolor pop culture painting
Bob Ross

‘8 Bit Watercolors Explore the Intersection of Pop Culture and Retro Video Game Graphics watercolor pop culture painting
Mona Lisa at the Louvre

‘8 Bit Watercolors Explore the Intersection of Pop Culture and Retro Video Game Graphics watercolor pop culture painting
Mona Lisa

‘8 Bit Watercolors Explore the Intersection of Pop Culture and Retro Video Game Graphics watercolor pop culture painting
The Selling of “The Scream”

‘8 Bit Watercolors Explore the Intersection of Pop Culture and Retro Video Game Graphics watercolor pop culture painting
Wonder Woman

‘8 Bit Watercolors Explore the Intersection of Pop Culture and Retro Video Game Graphics watercolor pop culture painting
A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte

Inspired in part by the 8-bit graphics of old Atari and Nintendo video games from his youth, artist Adam Lister paints quirky watercolor interpretations of pop culture icons, art world happenings, and famous paintings. Trying to describe his style can be difficult as it’s not quite digital and it’s not quite Cubism (though maybe it’s a tad Etch A Sketch?). While all of Lister’s works are distinctly humorous, many are also strangely nostalgic, recalling moments from the recent past including comic book characters, Star Wars references, and even numerous interpretations of iconic TV painter Bob Ross.

Lister has several limited edition prints available on his website, and his work most recently appeared as part of a group show at Catalyst Gallery. He’s also turned several pieces into 3D printed objects. (via Yatzer, Huffington Post)

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LIX: The World’s Smallest 3D Printing Pen Lets You Draw in the Air

LIX: The Worlds Smallest 3D Printing Pen Lets You Draw in the Air pens 3d printing

LIX: The Worlds Smallest 3D Printing Pen Lets You Draw in the Air pens 3d printing

LIX: The Worlds Smallest 3D Printing Pen Lets You Draw in the Air pens 3d printing

LIX is the latest contender in the handheld 3D-printing field. Launched just a few hours ago on Kickstarter, the developers say the super compact design is smaller than any other pen on the market and it can even be powered by the electricity from a USB port. After turning it on the LIX takes less than a minute to heat up and you’re ready to start creating vertical illustrations. Via LIX:

LIX 3D printing pen has the similar function as 3D printers. It melts and cools coloured plastic, letting you create rigid and freestanding structures. Lix has a hot-end nozzle that is power supplied from USB 3.0 port. The plastic filament ABS/PLA is introduced in the upper extremity of Lix Pen. The filament goes through a patented mechanism while moving through the pen to finally reach the hot-end nozzle which melts and cools it down. An interesting fact about this light-weight, engineered pen is that these structures can be formed in any imaginable shape.

The LIX pen has a much sleeker form and a finer tip than similar devices we’ve seen like the 3Doodler, though it’s a bit more expensive. See more on their website. (via Mashable)

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