Category: Art

Warped Street Art Portraiture by Stamatis Laskos

Warped Street Art Portraiture by Stamatis Laskos street art portraits

Warped Street Art Portraiture by Stamatis Laskos street art portraits

Warped Street Art Portraiture by Stamatis Laskos street art portraits

Warped Street Art Portraiture by Stamatis Laskos street art portraits

Warped Street Art Portraiture by Stamatis Laskos street art portraits

Warped Street Art Portraiture by Stamatis Laskos street art portraits

Warped Street Art Portraiture by Stamatis Laskos street art portraits

Warped Street Art Portraiture by Stamatis Laskos street art portraits

Warped Street Art Portraiture by Stamatis Laskos street art portraits

“Every portrait that is painted with feeling is a portrait of the artist, not of the sitter,” said Oscar Wilde. “It is not he who is revealed by the painter; it is rather the painter who, on the coloured canvas, reveals himself.” Never has this quote seemed more true than while admiring the street art of Stamatis Laskos, a 29-year old Greek artist who lives and works in Athens. He creates warped portraits of friends and other everyday people (as well as the occasional animal) through highly stylized depictions that are alive with detail, depth and dimension. Here are a few examples what he’s done over the last few years on the streets of Greece. He’s currently inspiring a group of budding young artists as an art instructor for an elementary school. You can follow him and his elongated necks and legs over on behance.

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Giant Paper Flowers by Tiffanie Turner

Giant Paper Flowers by Tiffanie Turner paper flowers

Giant Paper Flowers by Tiffanie Turner paper flowers

Giant Paper Flowers by Tiffanie Turner paper flowers

Giant Paper Flowers by Tiffanie Turner paper flowers

Giant Paper Flowers by Tiffanie Turner paper flowers
Photo by Sarah Deragon

Giant Paper Flowers by Tiffanie Turner paper flowers
Photo by Sarah Deragon

Spanning nearly three feet wide, these giant fluffy flowers were crafted from paper by San Francisco-based artist and architect Tiffanie Turner. Because of the massive scale of each piece a single flower can take upward of 35-80 hours to assemble from crepe paper. She shares via her artist statement:

My work in paper stems from my background as an architect, particularly my interest in how things are made and the use of repetitive elements, along with my lifelong obsession with flowers and botanical drawings. The exploration of scale plays heavily into everything I do, and the organized chaos and rhythms in nature make the heads of flowers an excellent case study for me.

Later this week Turner opens a show titled “Heads” at Rare Device that runs through May 28, 2014. You can see more on her blog, and several pieces are available for purchase here. (via The Jealous Curator, My Modern Met)

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Peculiar Abstract Sandcastles by ‘Sandcastle Matt’

Peculiar Abstract Sandcastles by Sandcastle Matt sand

Peculiar Abstract Sandcastles by Sandcastle Matt sand

Peculiar Abstract Sandcastles by Sandcastle Matt sand

Peculiar Abstract Sandcastles by Sandcastle Matt sand

Peculiar Abstract Sandcastles by Sandcastle Matt sand

Peculiar Abstract Sandcastles by Sandcastle Matt sand

No these aren’t the homes of mutant sea creatures or geographic oddities forged from centuries of tidal currents, they’re sandcastles built by a Massachusetts man who goes by Sandcastlematt. Using found objects like vines, plywood, and other junk he creates a sturdy framework to which he applies the classic drip method sandcastle technique resulting in these strange temorary structures that look like contemporary land art pieces.

One of Matt’s sandcastles recently made the rounds in a viral meme suggesting his work was the result of lightning striking sand, but Scientific American debunked it. See more of his castles right here.

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271 Years Before Pantone, an Artist Mixed and Described Every Color Imaginable in an 800-Page Book

271 Years Before Pantone, an Artist Mixed and Described Every Color Imaginable in an 800 Page Book watercolor history color books

271 Years Before Pantone, an Artist Mixed and Described Every Color Imaginable in an 800 Page Book watercolor history color books

271 Years Before Pantone, an Artist Mixed and Described Every Color Imaginable in an 800 Page Book watercolor history color books

271 Years Before Pantone, an Artist Mixed and Described Every Color Imaginable in an 800 Page Book watercolor history color books

271 Years Before Pantone, an Artist Mixed and Described Every Color Imaginable in an 800 Page Book watercolor history color books

271 Years Before Pantone, an Artist Mixed and Described Every Color Imaginable in an 800 Page Book watercolor history color books

In 1692 an artist known only as “A. Boogert” sat down to write a book in Dutch about mixing watercolors. Not only would he begin the book with a bit about the use of color in painting, but would go on to explain how to create certain hues and change the tone by adding one, two, or three parts of water. The premise sounds simple enough, but the final product is almost unfathomable in its detail and scope.

Spanning nearly 800 completely handwritten (and painted) pages, Traité des couleurs servant à la peinture à l’eau, was probably the most comprehensive guide to paint and color of its time. According to Medieval book historian Erik Kwakkel who translated part of the introduction, the color book was intended as an educational guide. The irony being there was only a single copy that was probably seen by very few eyes.

It’s hard not to compare the hundreds of pages of color to its contemporary equivalent, the Pantone Color Guide, which wouldn’t be published for the first time until 1963.

The entire book is viewable in high resolution here, and you can read a description of it here (it appears E-Corpus might have crashed for the moment). The book is currently kept at the Bibliothèque Méjanes in Aix-en-Provence, France. (via Erik Kwakkel)

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Digital Papercut Illustrations by Eiko Ojala

Digital Papercut Illustrations by Eiko Ojala paper illustration digital

Digital Papercut Illustrations by Eiko Ojala paper illustration digital

Digital Papercut Illustrations by Eiko Ojala paper illustration digital

Digital Papercut Illustrations by Eiko Ojala paper illustration digital

Digital Papercut Illustrations by Eiko Ojala paper illustration digital

Digital Papercut Illustrations by Eiko Ojala paper illustration digital

Digital Papercut Illustrations by Eiko Ojala paper illustration digital

Digital Papercut Illustrations by Eiko Ojala paper illustration digital

Since our last article on Eiko Ojala (previously) the Estonian graphic designer and illustrator has continued his fantastic three dimensional drawings for leading publications around the world. His process involves a mix of digital illustration, paper textures, and a mix of both real and artificial shadows. Eiko won a 2013 Young Illustrators award and an ADC Young Gun award, and his work has appeared in Wired, the New York Times, the New Yorker, Dwell Magazine and elsewhere. You can see more over on Behance.

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Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life-Sized Dolls

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary
Photo by horiyan

This is one of those things you might never believe if somebody told you, and yet even when faced with the evidence in photos, video, or Google Maps, you find yourself questioning reality (and maybe shaking off a serious case of the heebie jeebies). Welcome to Nagoro, a small village tucked into the valleys of Shikoku, Japan, a place where old residents are being replaced by life-sized dolls.

The work is part of a project by longtime resident and artist Ayano Tsukimi who returned to the village after an 11-year absence to discover many of her old neighbors and friends had left for larger cities or simply passed away. The town itself is dying with a dwindling population of about 35 people.

While gardening one day, Tsukimi constructed a scarecrow in the image of her father and was suddenly struck with the idea to replace other friends and family members with similar dolls. Over 350 dolls and 10 years later, her work continues. She places each doll in a place she feels is important to the memory of that person, so strolling through the down you might discover these inanimate memorials working in fields, fishing in rivers, or passing time in chairs along the road.

Berlin-based filmmaker Fritz Schumann recently visited with the 64-year-old artist and shot the documentary short above. (via Dan Sinker, The Verge)

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Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Two anonymous art students, who go by the moniker dangerdust, have been creating gorgeous hand-lettered and illustrated chalkboards featuring inspiring quotes from literary and public figures. Every Monday a new piece, rendered entirely by chalk, appears on the common chalkboard, only to be ephemerally replaced the following week. “Despite our overwhelming workload at Columbus College of Art & Design we bring it upon ourselves to create a chalkboard every week,” say the two students, explaining the motivation behind their late-night rogue art. Each piece, with its cleverly placed backdrop and bold composition, is as unique as the quote itself. They’re created in one fell swoop, which can take up to 11 hours. Like the students say themselves, “it’s the best form of vandalism.” Even if you’re not a student at their school you can follow their weekly creations on behance or Instagram. (via designboom)

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