Category: Art

Artist Charles Young’s Growing Metropolis of 635 Paper Structures 

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Last year we were thrilled to discover this little paper world constructed by artist Charles Young who conceived of the idea as a 365-day creative project to explore different architectural forms through paper, every single day for a year. Except… it turns out he never stopped. The tiny paper metropolis has now grown to 635 buildings, many with moving parts that Young expertly animates and shares daily on his Tumblr. The entire papercraft city will be on view from November 10-26, 2016 at the NEoN Digital Arts Festival in Dundee, Scotland.

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Explosive Scrap Timber Assemblages by Louise McRae 

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New Zealand-based artist Louise McRae works with pieces of discarded wood that are hand-split into small fragments and then carefully reassembled into intricate wall sculptures. The pieces often resemble aerial views of sprawling cities or macro views organic growths, accentuated with acrylic paints, foil, or even charring the piece with fire outright. You can see more of McRae’s abstract cubist wall pieces at Seed Gallery and Gallery 33. (via Tu Recepcja)

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Members of a Brazilian Indigenous Tribe Projected Onto the Amazon Rainforest by Photographer Philippe Echaroux 

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In a gesture to draw attention to the massive deforestation ravaging the Amazon rainforest, French photographer and street artist Philippe Echaroux projected the faces of indigenous Brazilians onto the forest’s trees. The projected images demonstrate the deep connection between the rainforest and its inhabitants, acknowledging the need for the preservation of their home and resources.

The photographs focus on the Suruí tribe of Brazil which is led by Chief Almir Surui Narayamoga and was asked by the Brazilian government to help replant their section of the rainforest in order to ensure and protect its longevity. Echaroux was invited by Chief Narayamoga to bring attention to the issue, which he highlighted through his projections.

Photographs from this series will be on display in the exhibition “The Crying Forest” at Galerie Taglialatella in Paris opening November 11 and running through December 15, 2016. You can see more of Echaroux’s work on his websiteInstagram, and Facebook, as well as a behind-the-scenes making of his work (in French) below. (via PetaPixel)

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New Glitched Sculptures of Women Chiseled from Wood by Yoshitoshi Kanemaki 

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Japanese sculptor Yoshitoshi Kanemaki (previously) produces figurative sculptures with varying abnormalities and glitches, doubling the eyes on some works, while multiplying the heads on others to convey an impressive array of human emotion. Each piece, with sizes ranging from life-size to miniature, is first sketched directly onto a large section of camphor wood and then chiseled to match the absurd female form. You can see more sculptures from Kanemaki on his Behance and Facebook.

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Artist Aki Inomata Provides Bagworms with Snippets of High Fashion to Create Matching Cocoons 

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Commenting on female consumer culture in Japan, artist Aki Inomata decided to dress female bagworms in extravagant attire, handing clippings of women’s dresses to the insects in order to transform them into protective cases. In nature, male bagworms shed these cases when they become moths. Females however, remain in these cases their entire lives, waiting patiently for the attention of a male. Reminded of the similarities to her own gender performance in Japan, Inomata exhibited her work with female bagworms at a department store that sells women’s clothing, her own commentary on what lengths women must still go to in order to be aesthetically accepted by society.

This is not the only time Inomata has worked with bugs or animals to alter their interpretation of the world. From 2009-2016 she crafted shells for hermit crabs based on differently global cities, and in 2009 she took French lessons with a parakeet. Inomata is represented by Maho Kubota Gallery in Tokyo and you can see more of her work on her website.

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Symmetrical Paint Mixing is Strangely Mesmerizing 

Canadian artist Annette Labedzki specializes in abstract figurative painting, but she’s also discovered the internet’s insatiable taste for the unusual and obscure with her Instagram account where she shares paint mixing videos. If watching paint dry is the most boring thing in the world, watching paint mix might be one of the more interesting things. For some of her clips Labedzki makes symmetrical versions, where the palette knife is obscured and everything seems to happen like magic. You can see more here. (thnx, kim!)

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