Category: Art

A Perpetual Whirlpool of Black Water Installed in a Gallery Floor by Anish Kapoor

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Anish Kapoor. “Descension” (2014) ©Anish Kapoor 2015

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via webindia123.com

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“If one is talking about sculpture then scale and skin is everything,” declared Anish Kapoor. He was speaking from India, the birthplace of the acclaimed sculptor, where his latest installation was part of the Kochi-Muziris Biennale. The skin of the object is what defines it, he goes on to explain, while scale creates a certain mystery around the object. Kapoor’s latest work, Descension, has both of these elements.

Unexpectedly set into the gallery floor is a large, seemingly endless hole. In it, a vortex of black water perpetually froths and churns. The whirlpool alters the form, or skin, of the water creating a fury of liquid that invades the walls of the gallery. Descension was on view in a corner room at the Aspinwall House in Fort Kochi, a meaningful location because the room opens to views of a peaceful sea that creates a striking contrast to the powerful whirling vortex. (via Designboom)

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French Artist ‘Levalet’ Injects Humor into the Streets of Paris with New Site-Specific Street Art

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A bronze bull head fountain is suddenly transformed into a minotaur. A decrepit corner of an alley becomes a holding pen for ostriches. If any of these odd happenings sound familiar to you, you’re probably living in Paris and have just witnessed the work of French artist Charles Leval (previously). Going by the name Levalet, the artist injects humor into the streets of Paris by gluing animal and human-shaped pasteups onto walls. A lot of thought goes into location too as each piece usually interacts with its environment in one way or another.

Levalet has been updating his site and facebook page with new work he’s created so far in 2015. When not on the streets, Levalet can be found in a classroom (he teaches art) and in a gallery (he held an exhibition late last year at Galerie Geraldine Zberro). “I was looking for places and contexts to operate,” says Levalet, referring to his prime medium: the wall. “The street became a creative space I had to invade.” (via StreetArtNews)

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An Impressive Piet Mondrian Painted with Stop-Motion Lego by Jon Rolph

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Watch as Lego enthusiast Jon Rolph deftly recreates a Piet Mondrian using stop-motion animation. While it may seem like a pretty straightforward idea, the attention to detail here is astounding, even PES was impressed. (via Stellar)

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Poetic Acrylic Paintings by Duy Huynh

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Vietnamese born artist Duy Huynh creates poetic acrylic paintings inspired by stories drawn from ancient folklore, comic books, film, and music. After moving to the United States as a child in the early 80s he took refuge in art as he struggled with language barriers and his new surroundings. Themes of cultural and geographical displacement frequently appear in Huynh’s work, including what he describes as “attempts to literally and symbolically connect fluid patterns in nature/wildlife with that of human made aspiration.” He currently has many original works available through Lark & Key Gallery, and you can see more in his archives. (via Cross Connect)

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Behind the Scenes of Elgin Park, a Retro City of Optical Illusions Photographed by Michael Paul Smith

Here at Colossal we’ve long been fans of photographer Michael Paul Smith whose broad life experiences lead him to the creation of Elgin Park, a fictional 20th century town filled with miniature 1/24th-scale models of cars and buildings. Smith mixes his carefully crafted model sets with die-cut automobiles and real-life backdrops, taking advantage of an optical illusion known as forced perspective. The photos have been a massive hit with the internet, racking up over 70 million views on his Flickr account alone.

Smith recently sat down with documentary director and producer Danny Yourd of Animal to discuss his significant personal challenges and life experiences that are now the driving force behind his photography. This is a must-watch for any creative grappling with aspects of identity or personal history in their artwork. He’s is also on the verge of publishing a new book, Elgin Park, which is available now for preorder. Seen here are some of his most recent photos along with behind-the-scenes views, there’s much more over on Flickr. (via PetaPixel)

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Kinetic ‘Insecta’ Lamps by U-Ram Choe

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Silver Insecta Lamp, 2013. Metallic material, machinery, electronic device (cpu board, motor, led), resin, magnet. 16 1/2 × 9 1/10 × 14 3/5 in. Courtesy of the artist and GALLERY HYUNDAI, Seoul.

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Gold Insecta Lamp, 2013. Metallic material, machinery, electronic device (cpu board, motor, led), resin, magnet. 16 1/2 × 9 1/10 × 14 3/5 in. Courtesy of the artist and GALLERY HYUNDAI, Seoul.

Korean sculptor U-Ram Choe (previously) builds kinetic sculptures embedded with CPUs, motors, and LEDs that appear to be equal parts organism and artwork. Seen here are two of his smallest works to date, a pair of insect-like lamps aptly titled Silver Insecta Lamp and Gold Insecta Lamp. When switched on, the lamps reveal an ornate set of five wing-like appendages that cycle through a gentle flapping motion. You can see how they work in the video above. All photos courtesy Gallery Hyundai. (via Artsy)

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Giant Tree Sculpture Cast from the Trunk of a 140-Year-Old Hemlock

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Photo by John Grade

Recently unveiled at the MadArt space in Seattle, Middle Fork is the lastest sculptural work by artist John Grade who worked with countless volunteers to realize this enormous scale mold of a 140-year-old tree.

The process began a year ago when Grade and a crew of assistants scaled a Western Hemlock tree in North Bend, Washington with help of a team of arborists. At nearly 90 feet in the air they created sectional plaster molds of the living tree which were carefully lowered and transported back to the MadArt space over a period of two weeks. Over the next 12 months, hundreds of volunteers (some who walked in right off the streets) helped to create a hollow sculpture of the tree using hundreds of thousands of small wood blocks. The final piece was carefully sanded down and is now suspended in the gallery. Watch the video below to see how it all came together.

Middle Fork is the first exhibition at the new MadArt space in Seattle and will be on view through April 25th before it goes on tour to galleries and art fairs around the U.S. In two years the pieces will be transported to the base of the living tree from which the mold was taken where they will decay and disintegrate back into the ground.

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Photo by John Grade

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Photos by John Grade

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Photos by John Grade

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Photo by Tim Detweiler

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Photo by Katie Wood

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