Category: Art

Miniature Narrative-Based Sculptures Created From Balsa Wood by Vera van Wolferen 

Dutch multidisciplinary artist Vera van Wolferen (previously) produces miniature balsa wood sculptures, architectural objects that are either incorporated into animations or left motionless to tell their own stories. Her static works are often displayed beneath glass bell jars, leaving the audience to imagine that the tiny tree houses, cottages, and campers are neatly contained within their own universes. Van Wolferen also uses simple craft materials like cotton to enhance her sets, making it appear as if her sculpted homes are resting amongst the clouds.

You can view more of van Wolferen’s wood sculptures and sets, as well as some of her cut paper illustrations, on her InstagramFacebook and Behance.

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Local and International Artists Produce 21 Light Installations For the Inaugural Toronto Light Festival 

Images via Thane Lucas/Toronto Light Festival

Set within a district of Victorian industrial buildings, the Toronto Light Festival is a free 45-day festival occurring during this year’s winter months as a way to creatively draw the city’s inhabitants out of their homes. Featuring 21 diverse light installations built by local and international artists and thousands of glowing bulbs, the festival covers a total of 13 acres in the city’s Distillery District. Installations range from a series of lit figures appearing to jump from the roof of one of the historic buildings to two red, geometric cats prowling an included alleyway, with several multi-colored works in-between.

You can catch Toronto’s first ever light art festival until March 12, or follow the festival on Instagram to catch snapshots of the glowing installations.

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Wooden Furniture Sculpted by Pontus Willfors Sprouts Unwieldy Roots and Limbs 

Organic chair. Maple wood, 68 x 64 x 72 in.

Through his sculptural practice, artist Pontus Willfors says that he seeks to examine “aspects of nature that are viewed by our society as product, nuisance or waste.” One of his frequently recurring motifs is the form of tree branches and root systems that sprout from from everyday objects as seen in this collection of furniture pieces that remind us explicitly of the material’s origins.

Willfors was born in Sweden and now lives and works in LA. These sculptures and several other artworks were on view as part of his exhibition titled Homeland at Edward Cella Art+Architecture in 2015. (via iGNANT)

Organic chair. Maple wood, 68 x 64 x 72 in.

Table with four chairs, 2015. White oak and honey locust wood, 146 x 160 x 168 in.

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The Met Places Over 375,000 Artworks into the Public Domain for Unrestricted Use 

Joan of Arc. Jules Bastien-Lepage, 1897. Oil on canvas.

Earlier this week, the Metropolitan Museum of Art announced that more than 375,000 images found in the museum’s online collection are now available for free and unrestricted use. The high-resolution images are licensed under Creative Commons, the non-profit organization that facilities the public use of some 1.1 billion digital works.

The announcement is an update to the Met’s 2014 initiative placing hundreds of thousands of images into the public domain, but the expanded policy, called Open Access, now allows for unrestricted usage including commercial purposes. The vast library of paintings, historical objects, photographs, textiles, and prints can now be utilized anywhere for any purpose. Metropolitan Museum of Art Director and CEO Thomas P. Campbell shares in the announcement:

We have been working toward the goal of sharing our images with the public for a number of years. Our comprehensive and diverse museum collection spans 5,000 years of world culture and our core mission is to be open and accessible for all who wish to study and enjoy the works of art in our care. Increasing access to the Museum’s collection and scholarship serves the interests and needs of our 21st-century audiences by offering new resources for creativity, knowledge, and ideas. We thank Creative Commons, an international leader in open access and copyright, for being a partner in this effort.

All images available through the new Open Access policy are searchable on the Met’s website. Simply check the “Public Domain Artworks” option under “Show only” and start searching. Seen here is a small collection of images available through the new policy. (via My Modern Met)

Victorian Interior I. Horace Pippin, 1945. Oil on canvas.

Openwork furniture plaque with ram-headed sphinx. Neo-Assyrian. ca. 9th–8th century B.C.

Jean-Léon Gérôme, 1868–69. Oil on cavas.

Panel with striding lion. Mesopotamia, Babylon (modern Hillah, Iraq) ca. 604–562 B.C. Ceramic, glaze.

Mäda Primavesi. Gustav Klimt, 1912–13. Oil on canvas.

Frederick Douglass. Portrait by Mathew B. Brady, 1880.

Award to the Hammond Typewriter Company. Jules-Clément Chaplain (French, Mortagne, Orne 1839–1909 Paris). Bronze.

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Overflowing Bouquets Built From Hundreds of Spare Utensils 

Ann Carrington produces sculpture that elevate objects used in the everyday, recontextualizing items as common as the household utensil. In her series Bouquets and Butterflies, Carrington gathers hundreds of spoons, knives, and forks both shiny and tarnished to create elegant bouquets. Clumping spoons together she is able to recreate the shapes of roses and tulips, some appearing so realistic you wonder if they are organic flowers dipped in a layer of silver.

The sculptures were included in Carrington’s solo exhibition Pop goes the Weasel! last summer at the Royal College of Art in London in addition to her ships formed from strings of pearls. You can see more of Carrington’s work on her Facebook and Instagram.

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