Category: Art

Surreal Animal Sculptures Carrying Monumental Elements of Nature by Wang Ruilin

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In an ongoing series titled “Dreams,” Chinese sculptor Wang Ruilin creates surreal animals that don’t act like animals at all. Their backs, and sometimes their antlers, function as arcs that carry monumental elements of nature like lakes and mountain cliffs. It’s like an animal-version of Noah’s Arc without people. “Leaving individuals behind is painful”, admits the 29-year old sculptor, but it allows us to reduce confusion and see the value and force of life.

Ruilin’s copper sculptures are the result of Eastern classical painting and imagery that’s been combined with past experiences. He recalls a life-changing incident when, at the age of 4 or 5, he encountered a painting of a horse by the artist Xu Beihong. He became obsessed with the vigorous animal and has ever since identified with it. The artist describes his creative process as digging deep into his heart and excavating “works that originally exist from various experiences.”

Ruilin’s “Dreams” series was most recently part of ART Beijing earlier this year. You can see more of his work on his website or follow him on Behance.

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Miniature Window Silhouettes Painted by ‘Pejac’ Interact with the Outside World

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Early last month, Spanish artist Pejac (previously) created a fun silhouette artwork commemorating the 40th anniversary of French high-wire walker Philippe Petit’s daring walk between the Twin Towers in New York. In Pejac’s version, a tightrope walker painted in black acrylic on an interior window is shown walking along an airplane contrail several miles away in the sky. The fun optical illusion caught the attention of Sasha Bogojev over at Hi-Fructose who discovered the artist has been creating similar silhouette artworks since 2011. Seen here are a few of our favorites. Photos by Paco Esteve and Silvia Guinovart courtesy the artist. (via Hi-Fructose)

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Circle of Abstract Ritual: A Stop Motion Timelapse Created from 300,000 Photos of Wildfires, Painted Houses, and Riots

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Circle of an Abstract Ritual is the latest stop motion timelapse from artist Jeff Frost (previously) who creates short films that defy description. This latest work gathers hundreds of thousands of photographs taken over the last two years during wildfires, riots, and inside abandoned houses where he created a series of optical illusion paintings. Frost says the film “began as an exploration of the idea that creation and destruction might be the same thing,” and that it is in part “a way to get an ever so slight edge on the unknowable.” Whatever it is, or is not, it’s really up to you to decide. I definitely recommend watching through to the end for the scene with trees—keep in mind the entire film was created without digital special effects or graphics. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

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Textured Cut Paper Illustrations by Morgana Wallace Depict Scenes of Mythology and Dreams

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Artist and illustrator Morgana Wallace creates mixed media compositions that reference various aspects of mythology and realms of fantasy. The artworks are made from layers of cut paper with additional details added in watercolor and gauche. You can see much more on her website and over at Madrona Gallery. (via So Super Awesome, Trend Hunter)

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Contemporary Artistic Arrangements of Microscopic Diatoms by Klaus Kemp

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Ever since exploring slides of arranged diatoms earlier this year from the California Academy of Sciences, I was left with one small question: how? Diatoms are tiny single-cell algae encased in jewel-like shells that are among the smallest organisms on Earth of which there are an estimated 100,000 extant species. How does one go about finding, capturing, cleaning, organizing, and arranging these artistic displays that are so small they are measured in microns?

One such person who asked these questions was Klaus Kemp who became fascinated by some of the earliest diatom arrangements dating back to the Victorian era. Kemp has since dedicated his life to the study and perfection of modern day diatom arrangements, and his works are among the most complex being made today. Filmmaker Matthew Killip recently sat down with Kemp and learned more about his process in this short film called the Diatomist.

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Artist ‘Bordalo II’ Brings Trash and Found Objects to Life on the Streets of Lisbon

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For the past few months Portuguese artist Bordalo II (previously) has been stalking the streets of Lisbon looking for heaps of trash. Using mounds of discarded plastic sheeting, old tires, shingles, and tangles of electrical cable, he carefully repositions everything before spray painting it to resemble animals and insects. You can see more from the ongoing series on Facebook.

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Multi-layered Laser-cut Wood Artworks by Martin Tomsky

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Freelance illustrator and graphic artist Martin Tomsky is gifted in the art of laser cutting wood. He creates everything from tiny pendants and brooches of small animals to these intricately layered sculptural works depicting entire illustrated scenes. See much more in his Etsy shop. (via Boing Boing, Jessica Olin)

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