Category: Art

Creating The Never-Ending Bloom: The Amazing Mathematical Wonders of John Edmark 

We’ve long marveled at artist John Edmark's (previously) kinetic objects that function as a medium to express a variety of mathematical formulas and concepts. The spiral-like sculptures often defy description and even when looking at them it’s hard to understand how they work, something he refers to as “instruments that amplify our awareness of the sometimes tenuous relationship between facts and perception.” The folks at SciFri recently visited with Edmark in his studio to learn more about how he works and to catch a glimpse of some rather unusual sculptures he’s created over the last few years.

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Dried Leaves Crocheted into Delicate Sculptures by Susanna Bauer 

All photographs by art-photographers.co.uk

At the intersection of thread, leaves, and her steady hands, artist Susanna Bauer (previously here and here) produces miraculous little sculptures that fuse the natural world with the handmade. Her crocheted embellishments stitched into dry leaves introduce unusual patterns or create hybrid “assemblages” of multiple fragments, and at times she adds elements that appear almost naturally occurring.

Bauer says she creates the works as a tribute to nature but also as a mirror to ourselves. “I’m interested in the way we relate to each other, how we are connected and what moves us,” she shares, “what we hold close and what we send out, how our own inner tenderness can give us strength and how every being is beautiful in its individuality and in its dialog with others.”

All of the pieces seen here are part of a new solo exhibition titled Connections that opened today at
Le Salon Vert Gallery in Switzerland.

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Saltscapes: Mirrors Reflect the Sky in an Australian Salt Flat Lake 

Mirror 11, 2017

Mirror 11, 2017

Since 2003, Australian photographer Murray Fredericks has made at least twenty journeys to the center of Lake Eyre, a desert lake with an extremely high concentration of salt. Fredericks drags all of his equipment out into the barren landscape, capturing the dramatic sky reflected in both the inch-deep water and his rectangular mirror. The images are breathtaking color-based works, my favorites featuring a double horizon locked within the mirror and the water below.

“In the ‘Vanity’ series, rather than reflecting our own ‘surface’ image, the mirror is positioned to draw our gaze out and away from ourselves, into the environment, driving us towards an emotional engagement with light, colour and space,” said Fredericks about the series.

Images from Vanity are included in his solo exhibition titled Salt:Vanity at Hamiltons Gallery in London through June 14, 2017. You can see a behind-the-scenes look at Fredericks’ photographic process and journey into Lake Eyre in the short video above. (via Ignant)

Mirror 13, 2017

Mirror 13, 2017

Mirror 30, 2017

Mirror 6, 2017

Mirror 6, 2017

Mirror 12, 2017, all images © Murray Fredericks

Mirror 18, 2017

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The Guggenheim Museum Shares Over 200 Free Art Books Through the Internet Archive 

Over the last few years, the Guggenheim Museum has slowly released an impressive library of modern and historic art books in collaboration with the Internet Archive. The rare and out-of-print titles include books about Pablo Picasso, Roy Lichtenstein, Paul Klee, Jenny Holzer, Joseph Cornell, as well as several exhibition catalogs and books about the museum itself. You’ll also find publications on wide ranging topics from the Russian and Soviet avant-garde movement to collections of Chinese and Aztec art.

Many of the books first books appeared online in 2012 and the collection has grown to include over 200 titles that can be viewed online or downloaded in PDF or ePub formats. You can see the full collection here. (via The Creators Project, My Modern Met)

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Friendly Giants Built From Recycled Wood Hidden in the Forests of Copenhagen 

Danish artist Thomas Dambo works on large-scale sculptures with recycled materials, having completed 25 wooden works around the world in just under three years. His latest project, The Six Forgotten Giants, is based in his hometown of Copenhagen, a project that builds and hides friendly giants throughout the city’s forests. Using a treasure map, visitors can find the oversized creatures, each of which comes with a poem that describes a bit of their personality.

All of the giants are produced from recycled wood, material that was gathered by Dambo and his team from 600 pallets, a shed, an old fence, and various other sources. Using local volunteers to build the works, Dambo then names each sculpture after one of the builders, such as Teddy Friendly seen below. You can see more images of the oversized sculptures on Dambo’s website. (via Bored Panda)

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The Skewed Classical Furniture of Sebastian Brajkovic 

Stretched like a digital glitch, these distorted chairs by Dutch artist Sebastian Brajkovic appear more like a product of Photoshop than a physical object. The Paris-based sculptor has been turning heads (and twisting necks) at art museums and galleries for over a decade with his ongoing Lathe series that imparts elements of the digital world onto classical furniture designs. Brajkovic extrudes the seats, backs, and even the designs printed on them to form wild new chairs with varying degrees of functionality.

Brajkovic’s work is now part of the permanent collections at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and the Museum of Arts and Design in New York. You can see more of his recent work on Artsy. (via Visual Fodder)

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