Art

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Art

Ivan Puig’s glass bottle mandalas played with robotic arms

April 6, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Two light and sound installations in one day? Yes, friends. These two mesmerizing water-filled glass bottle mandalas were built by Mexican artist Ivan Puig. Robotic arms in the center of each mandala rotate and hit each bottle in succession to create a cyclical series of echoing notes. If you read a lot of art blogs you’ve probably tun into Puig’s submerged VW sedan sculpture.

 

 



Art

Sewing Machine Orchestra

April 6, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Sewing Machine Orchestra is a sound and light performance by Canadian artist Martin Messier. The eight 1940-1950s Singer sewing machines are interlinked with a micro-controller system without need for human interaction. I found myself wishing the video was a minute or two longer, but impressive nonetheless.

Update: Found a longer clip on YouTube that includes an interview (in French) with the artist:

(via triangulation)

 

 



Art

Sean Healy’s Cigarettes

April 5, 2011

Christopher Jobson

(click for detail)

Portland-based multimedia artist Sean Healy uses cigarette butts, resin, and ink to create these spectacular sculptures. See his latest exhibition, Upstate, at Elizabeth Leach Gallery in Portland, April 7-May 28. Images courtesy the artist and Elizabeth Leach Gallery (the last two are via Studio JFISH). (via c-monster)

 

 



Art

Meg Hitchcock

April 5, 2011

Christopher Jobson

(click for detail)

Brooklyn-based artist Meg Hitchock dissects religious texts such as the Bible, Koran, and Torah and uses the individual letters to create maddeningly complex, interwoven collages of typography. Via her artist statement:

In my series Mantras & Meditations, I examine and deconstruct the word of God as interpreted through the world religions. I select passages from holy books and cut the letters from one passage to form the text of another. For example, I may cut up a passage from the Old Testament of the Bible and reassemble it as a passage from the Bhagavad Gita, or I may use type from the Torah to recreate an ancient Tantric text. A continuous line of text forms the words and sentences in a run-on manner, without spaces or punctuation, creating a visual mantra of devotion.

In her most recent work at Famous Accountants Hitchcock spent 135 hours transcribing (gluing tens of thousands of letters, ahem) the entire Book of Revelation, the last book of the Christian New Testament, but with text cut out from an English translation of the Koran. And if 135 hours seems like a lot, she began cutting the individual letters for the installation almost six months before its opening. The text ran across gallery walls and floors like an endless rope of words. See video of that piece as well as a brief interview here:

I can’t decide if I’m more impressed with her artwork or simply what must be her incredible patience. See more of her work here. (via hyperallergic)

 

 



Art

Jo Hamilton’s Crochet Portraits

April 5, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Artist Jo Hamilton crochets elaborate portraits using layers of colored yarn. (via beautiful decay)

 

 



Art

Be Your Own Souvenir

April 4, 2011

Christopher Jobson

So you’re at the museum, and deep down in the sub-basement right next to the restrooms you happen to discover an enormous machine that looks like it was pulled from the Aliens II movie set. And then you notice you can insert a dollar, and suddenly the machine whirs to life and pipes hot, neon green plasticine into a mold in front of your very eyes as you inahale noxious fumes. Within moments you’re in the possession of a bona-fide neon green submarine, a memento of your visit to the museum that smells strange for days. Be Your Own Souvenir by Barcelona-based blablabLAB is just like that, except a trillion times more awesome. Using custom software developed using openFrameworks and openKinect, visitors film themselves in front of 3 kinect sensors for a full 360-degree scan and within moments a 3D printer known as a RepRap machine spits out a little army guy version of themselves. Every museum in the world should have one of these in their sub-basement, though they can probably install this by the front door. (via vimeo)

 

 



Art

Annie Vought

April 3, 2011

Christopher Jobson

(click images for detail)

New work from artist Annie Vought who delicately cuts away the white space from handwritten letters and scribbles. It seems her work has increased dramatically in its scale and complexity since I posted about her last year. See her work at Unspeakable Projects in San Francisco as part of her joint show “You Are A Bitch” with Hannah Ireland through April 21.

 

 

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