Art

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Art

A Preview of the Second Annual Nuart Aberdeen Street Art Festival

March 30, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Mural by Fintan Magee, all images taken by Ian Cox

Mural by Fintan Magee (2017), all images taken by Ian Cox, courtesy of Nuart Aberdeen

Fintan Magee (2017)

The second annual Nuart Aberdeen kicks off next month, celebrating the work of international street artists with workshops, guided tours, and film screenings throughout the course of the four-day festival. The public art platform aims to activate its local art scene while also encouraging visiting artists to collaborate with its twin city of Stavanger, which has hosted the original Nuart Festival for the last 17 years.

In 2017 the Scotland-based festival presented site-specific murals and interventions by Fintan Magee, Martin Whatson, Add Fuel, Jaune, and more. This year’s installations and temporary exhibitions will center around the theme “A Revolution of the Ordinary,” and include work by international artists Bordalo II, Bortusk Leer, Carrie Reichardt, Dr. D, Elki, Ernest Zacharevic, Glöbel Bros., Hyuro, Milu Correch, Nimi & RH74, Phlegm, and Snik.

The opening of Inky Protest, a collaborative exhibition between Nuart and Peacock Visual Arts, kicks off the festival on Thursday, April 12. The exhibition will feature work by artists such as Brad Downey, Mike Giant and Ralph Steadman, Futura, Martha Cooper and Jamie Reid. You can view a preview of the upcoming festival in the video below. (StreetArtNews)

Martin Whatson

Martin Whatson (2017)

Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal (2017)

Add Fuel

Add Fuel (2017)

Julien de Casabianca

Julien de Casabianca (2017)

Herakut

Herakut (2017)

Jaune

Jaune (2017)

Robert Montgomery

Robert Montgomery (2017)

 

 



Art Craft

Stitched Sculptural Installations of Everyday Objects and Gestures by Amanda McCavour

March 30, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Toronto-based textile artist Amanda McCavour uses thread and a sewing machine to construct sculptural installations that dance between two and three dimensions. McCavour stitches on a special fabric that dissolves in water to create the surfaces of thread. Through renderings of objects like sofas, kitchen tables, and backpacks, as well as arms and hands engaged in work, she explores connections to home and the fibers of the body. In an artist statement McCavor states she is interested “in thread’s assumed vulnerability, its ability to unravel, and its strength when it is sewn together.”

McCavour holds an MFA from the Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia, and she exhibits widely. Currently, her Floating Garden installation is on display at the Cornell Art Museum in Florida as part of their Flora exhibition, which opens today, March 30th, and is on view through September 9, 2018. Flora also includes Tiffanie Turner (previously), and Miya Ando (previously). You can see more of McCavour’s work on her Facebook page and via Instagram.

 

 



Art Photography

The Diverse Daily Life of a Ping Pong Table in Germany Photographed by Tomiyasu Hayahisa

March 29, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

In 2011 Tomiyasu Hayahisa started photographing a ping pong table located in a public athletic field across from his dorm in Leipzig, Germany for a series titled TTP. Tomiyasu had first noted the location after observing a white tailed fox perched near the legs of the table, and after waiting several days for the animal to return, he began to photograph the other life forms that congregated or paused near the outdoor game. Rather than spotting the fox, he captured families, partiers, and lonesome daydreamers using the area as a bench or bed.

“At the time I had been living in a student doom in Leipzig and it was possible to photograph from window the table tennis table, how people from different countries use it in their way,” Tomiyasu told Colossal. “And it could be the message of this work that the place could be everywhere.”

If you enjoyed this series, you might also enjoy Yevgeniy Kotenko‘s On the Bench, a project which observed the daily life of a park bench in Ukraine for over a decade. TTP has been shortlisted for the 2018 MACK First Book Award. You can see more of Tomiyasu‘s work on his website. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 



Art

Lifelike Sculpted Figures and Immersive Monochrome Environments by Hans Op de Beeck

March 28, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

The Collector's House, sculptural installation, 2016. Coated wood, coated polyester, pigmented plaster, PU, metal, glass, 20 × 12.5 × 4 m

The Collector’s House, sculptural installation, 2016. Coated wood, coated polyester, pigmented plaster, PU, metal, glass, 20 × 12.5 × 4 m

Belgian artist Hans Op de Beeck creates life-size figural sculptures and immersive environments from materials such as coated wood, polyester, and pigmented plaster. These chosen materials turn his constructed figures and installations into a uniform shade of matte gray, which makes the viewer feel as if the world around them has been zapped of color.

In his 2016 work The Collector’s House, Op de Beeck produced a 2,600-square-foot monochrome space in which visitors served as the only element of color. The museum-like installation contained several life-size sculpted figures in addition to a library, grand piano, furniture, scattered still lifes, and a lily pool positioned squarely at the work’s center. This work, like many in his practice aimed to stimulate the viewer’s senses and to “create a form of visual fiction that delivers a moment of wonder, silence and introspection,” he explained in an artist statement.

Op de Beeck currently works in both Brussels and Gooik, Belgium. Over the last decade, Op de Beeck has mounted institution-based solo exhibitions at museums across the US and Europe, including the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden (2010), MOCA Cleveland (2014), and Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg (2017). You can view more of his lifelike figures and installations on his website.

The Collector's House, sculptural installation, 2016. Coated wood, coated polyester, pigmented plaster, PU, metal, glass, 20 × 12.5 × 4 m

The Collector’s House, sculptural installation, 2016. Coated wood, coated polyester, pigmented plaster, PU, metal, glass, 20 × 12.5 × 4 m

The Collector's House, sculptural installation, 2016. Coated wood, coated polyester, pigmented plaster, PU, metal, glass, 20 × 12.5 × 4 m

The Collector’s House, sculptural installation, 2016. Coated wood, coated polyester, pigmented plaster, PU, metal, glass, 20 × 12.5 × 4 m

Tatiana (Soap Bubble), sculpture, 2017. Polyester, wood, polyamide

Tatiana (Soap Bubble), sculpture, 2017. Polyester, wood, polyamide

Sleeping Girl, sculpture, 2017. Mixed Media

Sleeping Girl, sculpture, 2017. Mixed Media

Brian, sculpture, 2018. Polyester, glass, coating

Brian, sculpture, 2018. Polyester, glass, coating

Tatiana (Butterfly), sculpture, 2017. Polyester, wood, polyamide

Tatiana (Butterfly), sculpture, 2017. Polyester, wood, polyamide

The Garden Room, sculptural installation, 2017

The Garden Room, sculptural installation, 2017

 

 



Art

A Madrid Plaza Transformed Into a Temporary Park With Over 35,000 Square Feet of Grass

March 27, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

For the 400th anniversary of Madrid’s Plaza Mayor, urban artist SpY (previously) transformed the bustling square into a centralized place of respite. The temporary park titled Cesped, or “Grass,” was created by bringing in more than 35,000 square feet of sod, which formed a perfect green circle at the center of the pedestrian plaza. Over the course of its four day installation last fall more than 100,000 visitors lounged, played, and rested in the celebratory work.

You can watch a time-lapse installation of the project on the Madrid-based artist’s website, and view more urban interventions on his Instagram.  (via designboom)

 

 



Art

New Architectural Sculptures by David Moreno Appear As Three Dimensional Drawings

March 26, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Spanish sculptor David Moreno (previously) continues to blur the lines between two and three dimensions with his architectural artworks. Created using hundreds of steel rods and lengths of piano wire, Moreno’s sculptures take the shape of buildings, and his more recent works have ventured indoors, highlighting interior details like doorways and staircases. In 2017, the artist also created a large, immersive installation in the United Arab Emirates titled “Connecting Doors.”  Moreno shares his work on Instagram and Behance.

 

 



Art

Minima Muralia: A Collection of 15 Years of Murals by Street Artist Blu

March 23, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

The newly published book Minima Muralia condenses more than 200 larger-than-life murals painted by Blu (previously) into one 288-page collection. The compendium covers every piece made by the Italian street artist over the last 15 years, including backstage shots and unreleased works pulled from his archive. A special edition of the book has also been released, featuring a 32-page zine, two posters, and a specially-designed book casing. You can order both releases on Zooo Print & Press.

In addition to putting out this recent compilation of his works, Blu has also painted a new mural in the town of La Punta, just outside of Valencia, Spain. The piece was created as a part of the Sensemurs Project, a group of muralists attempting to raise awareness about the preservation of peri-urban orchards in towns affected by rapid urbanization across Europe. You can see this new mural, along with work by Borondo and Daniel Munoz SAN, over on Juxtapoz.