Category: Art

New ‘Eco-Surrealist’ Paintings by Josh Keyes Observe a Post-Human World 

Josh Keyes (previously) paints scenes that observe the world at the brink of destruction. His works often focus on polar bears and sharks, one species which will soon lose its home as ice shelves continue to melt, and the other which is poised to take over an Earth undersea. The animals are placed in settings that suggest a post-human existence, such as a pair of fighting horses in front of a beached ship and a solitary brown bear looking over a seemingly empty metropolis.

The hyperrealistic paintings also incorporate graffiti found in unlikely places. Tags cover satellites, icebergs, and even a shark, an allusion to the lengths at which humans are willing to leave their mark.

Keyes’ solo exhibition, Implosion, opens August 5th at Thinkspace Gallery in LA and runs through August 26, 2017. You can see more of his works on his Instagram and website. (via Juxtapoz, Arrested Motion)

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A Village Encapsulated Inside a 5-Story Robot’s Head and Other Recent Murals by ‘Phlegm’ 

This past month, Sheffield-based artist Phlegm (previously) revealed his latest mural, a 5-story tall robot on Chapel Street in Melbourne, Australia. The mechanical monster hides a village, or maybe an entire world, beneath its metal scalp, which it reveals while simultaneously dangling a lantern over the homes below. To create the work, Phlegm worked with the building’s mechanics, repurposing a flashing carpark light near the structure’s third floor into a beating heart for his large-scale visitor. You can see more of the muralist’s black and white illustrative pieces from the last year in Manchester, Florida, Oslo, and Toronto, as well as a time-lapse video of his Melbourne-based robot mural, below.

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Household Objects Overgrown With Sprouted Wooden Limbs by Camille Kachani 

Lebanese-Brazilian artist Camille Kachani creates humorous wooden sculptures that directly reference their origin, weaving root systems into household objects like chairs and shelves, while sprouting leafy plants from the handles of hammers and hedge clippers. Due to their overgrown state, the sculptures he builds are rendered unusable, almost as if their original material is attempting to reclaim the carved form. Garden tools like a shovel and a hoe appear to come alive, fake leaves covering the branches that have forked from their wooden base.

You can see more of Kachani’s works through Sao Paulo’s Zipper Galeria where he is currently represented.

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Weeds and Flowers Recast as Shadowy Subjects in Daniel Shipp’s Dramatic Photographs 

In Daniel Shipp's series Botanical Inquiry, the Sydney-based photographer explores how plants and flowers found at the edges of urban infrastructure fit into our modern world. Shipp collects seemingly unremarkable plants and photographs the subjects in built dioramas, an environment that allows him to manipulate the relationship between foreground and background with a controlled precision. Through this process he is able to create dramatic photographs in-camera, shooting digitally but using old visual effects techniques developed for early cinema.

By highlighting botanical specimens we have culturally labeled “weeds,” Shipp attempts to shift the viewer’s perspective on flora that they might walk past each day. He recasts these marginal plants as the subject of each of his photographic stories, showcasing their knack for survival even in the face of pollution and harmful human intervention.

“There are some beautiful ‘weeds’ that we might walk past all the time,” Shipp explains to Colossal. “I knew that if I could present these often unnoticed plants in the right context that there was potential for storytelling. Next time you go for a walk make an effort to look for plants in places you wouldn’t normally—shopping center carparks, service stations etc.”

Shipp further explained that one of the most beautiful colors he has photographed for the series was found on the underside of the foliage of a plant common to industrial parks across Sydney. The hidden purple was one of the most incredible metallic shades he had ever seen, and it had been sneakily surrounding him for the majority of his life.

Shipp was recently announced as the winner of Magnum and LensCulture's 2017 Fine Art Photo Award. You can see more of his photographs on his website and Instagram, and take a behind-the-scenes look at his Botanical Inquiry series in the short video below. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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Unbraided Rope Installations by Janaina Mello Landini Branch Like Roots and Nervous Systems 

Artist Janaina Mello Landini (previously) continues to produce dizzyingly complex installations and canvas-based sculptural works comprised of unbraided ropes that branch out like tree roots. The fractal-like artworks have developed over a period of six years as part of her “Ciclotrama” series, a word she coined that combines the root word “cycle” and the Latin word “trama” meaning warp, weaving, or cobweb. Via Zipper Galeria:

Janaina Mello Landini aggregates her knowledge of architecture, physics and mathematics and her perception on time to develop pieces that travel through different scales. The labyrinthine architecture has been the central axis of her research in the “Ciclotramas” series, made with ropes that break down into minimal threading, and “Labirintos Rizomáticos”, works in satin that result in the construction of multifocal perspectives, nullifying the traditional construction.

Landini has created numerous pieces for several shows and installations over the past year, most notably for an exhibition at Galleria Macca last June. You can see more of her recent work on Artsy and Zipper Galeria. (via Visual Fodder)

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Segmented Glass Sculptures Inspired by Cell Division by Jiyong Lee 

Cell-Building block, 14 x 14 x 14 inch, 2016

Driven by an interest in the biological process of cell division, artist Jiyong Lee (previously) fabricates translucent sculptural works of segmented glass components fused through coldworking techniques. Some pieces purposefully take the form of organic life with titles such as “White-orange Chromosome Segmentation” or “Geometric cell membrane segmentation” while others are decidedly more geometric in nature. Born and raised in South Korea, Lee has helmed the glass program at Southern Illinois University since 2005. He most recently had a solo exhibition with Clara Scremini Gallery in Paris, and you can see many more of his pieces on Artsy.


White-orange Chromosome Segmentation, 7 x 12 x 16 inch, 2017

Orange Cylinder Segmentation, 5.7 x 11.5 inch, 2017

Geometric cell membrane segmentation, 17 x 14 x 14 inch, 2016

Black & White segmented Cylinder, 5.5 x 13.75 inch, 2015

Gold-Ruby Trapezohedron, 9.25 x 15 x 10.5 inch, 2015

Blue-Yellow cuboid segmentation, 10.5 x 9 x 5 inch, 2015

white Drosophila embryo segmentation, 6.5h x 14.5w x 5.75d (inch), 2014

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