Category: Crafts

New Sportswear Logos Embroidered With Flowers and Vegetables by James Merry 

Iceland-based artist James Merry (previously) uses sportswear logos as the basis to his embroidered designs, planting thread-based mushrooms, strawberries, and various flowers on top of Nike swooshes and the ADIDAS logo’s three bars. Although you might not guess it from the simplicity of his sportswear alterations, Merry is a key collaborator with Björk, and has designed many of her costumes for tour and film. You can see more of his blossoming sports logos and elaborate costume designs on his website and Instagram.

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Paper Cutouts by ‘Paperboyo’ Transform World Landmarks into Quirky Scenes 

London-based paper artist and photographer Rich McCor (aka. paperboyo) has a way of seeing the world from a slightly different perspective. By adding a simple paper cutout to the foreground of famous buildings or other popular tourist attractions, he creates novel moments in time where an octopus squirms from inside the Colosseum or a WW2-era sailor embraces the Leaning Tower of Pisa in reference to the famous photo by Alfred Eisenstaedt. McCor makes frequent mentions to pop culture by recreating scenes from films or by repurposing works from other artists. To see what he dreams up next you can join his near quarter million followers on Instagram. (via Creators Project)

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Rainbow Drip Vessels by Brian Giniewski Ceramics 

Ceramic artist Brian Giniewski produces delightful earthenware vessels that appear to be oozing thick, colorful drips that are frozen in time. The Philadelphia-based ceramicist achieves the texture of the vases and bowls by applying a gritty, matte slip to each piece which contrasts nicely with a special glossy glaze made to melt into drips during the firing process. Giniewski is currently Kickstarting a move into a new studio space and is offering a variety of unique objects. You can see more of his work on Instagram and in his online shop.

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Embroidered Haute Couture Box Bugs by Noboru Hoareau 

French embroidery artist Noboru Hoareau recently stitched this fun series of creepy insects, spiders, and arthropods comprised mostly of beads. Each piece is embroidered into fabric and framed, an objects he refers to as a “embroidery haute couture box bug”. You can see much more in his Etsy shop. If you liked these, also check out the work of Humayrah Bint Altaf and Adam Pritchett. (via Lustik)

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Found Photographs Embroidered With Colorful Thread by Julie Cockburn 

“The Conundrum” (2016), hand embroidery on found photograph, all images courtesy of Flowers Gallery London and New York

London-based artist Julie Cockburn transforms vintage photographs by embroidering across their surfaces, adding bright pops of thread to portraits that are either black and white or have faded over time. Using found images from eBay and flea markets, Cockburn obscures the faces of strangers, layering the portraits with multi-colored dots, geometric patterns, or ovals in varying gradients.

Cockburn will exhibit work with The Photographers’ Gallery at The Photography Show presented by AIPAD March 30 through April 2, 2017 on New York City’s Pier 94. You can see more of Cockburn’s embroidered images on her Instagram and Facebook. (via Hyperallergic)

“Quizitive” (2016)

“Honeydew” (2013)

“The Secret” (2012)

“Point of View” (2014)

“The Orthodontist” (2014)

“Viewpoint” (2012)

“Morphine” (2014)

“Troublemaker” (2015)

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Miniature Retro Papercraft Synthesizers by Dan McPharlin 

Produced between 2006 and 2009, Australian designer and illustrator Dan McPharlin's Analogue Miniatures are a marvel of papercraft. The tiny analogue synthesizers and pieces of recording equipment were pieced together with paper, framing mat board, string, rubber bands and cardboard, and appeared in everything from art shows to editorial spreads in magazines like Esquire. McPharlin is widely known for his retro sci-fi illustration work that appears on album covers and in limited edition prints, and he brings this aspect of fiction to these paper models as well. None of the objects are meant as exact replicas or recreations of real-life devices, but are instead speculative objects that draw aesthetic attributes from the audio technology of the 70s and 80s.

You can see many more pieces from Analogue Miniatures on Flickr. (via Strictly Paper)

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