Category: Crafts

New Miniature Anatomical Sculptures and Jewelry Carved From Pearls by Shinji Nakaba 

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Shinji Nakaba (previously) is a master of carving carefully into miniature objects, creating skulls and other anatomical forms from pearls no larger than the end of a finger tip. Nakaba considers these works “wearable sculptures,” as each pearl takes the form of a ring, necklace, or pin. Although he uses precious metals and stones for his high-end jewelry, he is not against mixing in more common materials. Nakaba has been known to also incorporate aluminum from beer cans and trimmings from plastic bottles.

“I’m dealing with all materials equally no matter how precious they are,” said Nakaba. “I bring out their hidden talents and beauty and they are being re-born as treasure.”

You can see more of his wearable works on his online shop.

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Ultra Satisfying Porcelain Carving Videos by Abe Haruya 

・ #ceramics #pottery #porcelain#carving #うつわ #器 #しのぎ#飯碗#帳尻合わせ #阿部春弥 ・・

A video posted by Haruya Abe 阿部春弥 (@abe_haruya) on

・ #ceramics #pottery #porcelain #うつわ#器#面取#阿部春弥 #帳尻合わせ

A video posted by Haruya Abe 阿部春弥 (@abe_haruya) on

Japanese ceramic artist Haruya Abe shares short clips of a ceramic carving technique where top layers of porcelain are gently scraped away using a scalpel-like instrument. Not only does it create beautiful results, the process is just satisfying to watch. Given the same tools, I’d scrape these pieces into oblivion. You can see more photos and videos of Haruya’s studio work here. (via @StreetArtGlobe)

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Broken Ceramics Found on the Beach, Turned Into Chopstick Rests Using Kintsugi 

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“As every Japanese has realized, the waves can take away a great deal from us,” says artist Tomomi Kamoshita. But it is also true that we greatly benefit from it.” Using broken pieces of ceramics that she picked up on the shore, and combining it with pieces of her own broken ceramics, the Tokyo-based potter uses the ancient kintsugi method of repairing ceramics to turn the shards into one-of-a-kind chopstick rests.

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If the broken pieces of ceramics could talk, some would tell you that they fell off a ship. Others would tell you they were swept away by a tsunami. Some might even simply have been thrown away. But rather than focus on their tragic state of being, and how they got that way, Kamoshita looks to the future; the revival. “I wanted to revive what wave have brought us,” she says. In fact, many of the shards have been polished by the waves and sand while all the while retaining their beautiful colors.

As a potter, Kamoshita was skilled in the ancient craft of kintsugi: “a Japanese traditional repairing technique used to connect broken pieces together with gold.” Using this method – intended to accentuate the cracks rather than hide them – the artist pieces together the broken ceramics she’s collected. The pink pieces, she explains, are her own broken ceramics, which she likens to the cherry blossoms that come back to life every Spring.

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Kamoshita received honorable mention in the 2016 Ronin | Globus Artist-in-Residence Program, for which Spoon & Tamago [Colossal’s sister site] was a judge. The ceramic pieces will be on display in the group exhibition “Contemporary Talents of Japan” from June 23 to July 30, 2016 at the Ronin Gallery in New York. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

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New Winged Insects Constructed from Video Game and Computer Components 

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Before old circuit boards find their way to the landfill, Portsmouth, UK-based artist Julie Alice Chappell gives them new life as winged insects. Tearing the boards from old computers and video game systems she cuts and sculpts them into crawly creatures that resemble butterflies, dragonflies and even cockroaches. The upcycled bugs are further adorned with other electrical components that form various appendages. Each piece is one-of-a-kind and she sells them through her Etsy shop.

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New Felted Toy Specimens by Hine Mizushima 

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When you think of cuddly stuffed animals made from textiles the top candidates would probably include teddy bears or bunny rabbits. Perhaps lower on the list would be squids, cicadas, and sea slugs, and yet Vancouver-based artist Hine Mizushima has chosen these unusual creatures as the the subjects of her wildly popular hand-creafted felt toys. Her one-of-a-kind plush critters have been displayed in galleries around the world and she’s turned many of them into prints which she sells on Etsy and Society6. You can see some of her latest work on Behance.

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Felted Veggies Cling to Embroidery Hoops by Veselka Bulkan 

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Munich-based artist Veselka Bulkan (previously) continues to craft these whimsical veggies that dangle from embroidery hoops. Each piece is an amalgam of embroidered leaves affixed to felted carrots, beets, radishes and other colorful roots. Bulkan sells many of her creations via her online shop, Little Herb Boutique, and you can see her process on Instagram. (via Illusion)

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