Crafts

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Crafts

Colorful Crystal Explosions on Ceramic Vessels by Collin Lynch

August 30, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

It’s probably not advisable to grab hold of one of Collin Lynch’s blinged-out crystal cups before you’re fully awake. Working under the name Essarai Ceramics, Lynch specializes in oversized coffee mugs, each one a delightful riot of color and texture, with iridescent prismatic crystals seeming to explode off the surface.

Lynch works from his home studio in Albuquerque, New Mexico, where he allows each crystal formation to take shape as it is constructed. In addition to alluring surface aesthetics, Lynch also finds inspiration in his efforts to “unveil perfection through imperfection, which is where Truth lies. Nature, being the most delicate yet enduring example of this paradox, is where through the rough surfaces and shattered angles, we are reunited with ourselves.”

These mugs and other ceramic home goods are inspired by and named for specific stones like Smokey Quartz and Amethyst. Pieces are available for purchase on Lynch’s Etsy shop, and you can follow his works in progress on Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

 

 



Crafts Design

The Painstaking 12-Month Process of Crafting a Traditional Korean Inlaid Lacquer Box

August 25, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

This four and a half minute-long video from Victoria & Albert Museum condenses the twelve months of meticulous labor that are required to make a traditional Korean inlaid lacquer box. Featuring skilled craftsman Lee Kwang-Woong, the video shows each of the many steps, starting with harvesting sap from a lacquer tree, and including fret sawing, charcoal polishing, and lacquer curing. Although we’re just spectators in the process, the behind-the-scenes footage makes the final product shots that much more satisfying. (via Core77)

 

 



Crafts Food

New Edible ‘Amezaiku’ Animal Lollipop Designs by Shinri Tezuka

August 24, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Based out of a Tokyo candy shop called Ameshin, candy artisan Shinri Tezuka (previously) crafts some of the most unusual lollipops you’re ever likely to eat from wiggling goldfish to statuesque lions or prickly hedgehogs. The translucent candy seems to have more in common with glassmaking than confectionery design, and perhaps it’s no surprise that the process of working with hot sugar even shares similar tools—a traditional Japanese craft called amezaiku. Tezuka recently shared a variety of new lollipop designs on his Instagram account and you can step inside the Ameshin candy shop in a video from DogaTV below.

 

 



Crafts

Incredibly Lifelike Felt Paintings of Pets and Plants by Dani Ives

August 22, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Fiber artist Dani Ives conjures the natural world in her unique take on the traditional craft of needle felting. Ives describes her method as “painting with wool,” in which she applies her love of animals and her background in biology to build intricately layered portraits of a variety of flora and fauna.

Dogs, cats, birds, and farm animals come to life alongside toadstools and fruits, and Ives’ ability to capture the moisture and glint of animal eyes and noses adds an impressive degree of realism. While her plant life depictions take more of a traditional botanical angle, most of Ives’s animal subjects take center stage on the embroidery hoop, peering out at the viewer, further adding to the strong sense of unique personality, and it’s no surprise that she is in high demand for pet portrait commissions.

Ives sells originals and prints of her work on Etsy, and she continues her love of teaching by traveling from her home in Northwest Arkansas to lead workshops around the country, as well as offering e-courses in needle felting. You can also follow her work on Instagram.

 

 



Crafts Food

New Needle Felted Food and Animal Friends by Hanna Dovhan

August 16, 2017

Christopher Jobson

The word “cute” is woefully insufficient in describing the squee-inducing impression of these needled felted wool sculptures by Ukraine-based designer Hanna Dovhan (previously here and here). Her latest pairs of hand-made mustachioed donuts, mushrooms, croissants, and veggies are all designed to rest in a tender embrace or to simply hold hands. You can see more by following her on Instagram or in her Etsy shop Woolsculpture.

 

 



Art Crafts

Biodiversity Reclamation Suits: Extinct Bird Costumes for Urban Pigeons Crocheted by Laurel Roth Hope

August 15, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Paradise Parrot and Guadalupe Caracara, 2013. Crocheted yarn, hand carved pigeon mannequins, walnut stands.

When first engaging with these crocheted bird suits by artist Laurel Roth Hope it’s not without a bit of whimsy and an immediately appreciation for her skill with yarn and needle. The colorful one-of-a-kind sweaters are each designed to fit a standard urban pigeon, complete with a hood retrofitted with eye and beak holes. While the project isn’t without a bit of humor, its warning is particularly dire: each suit represents an extinct bird species and highlights the futility of restoring lost biodiversity. The works are purposely displayed on hand-carved pigeon mannequins to suggest that animals we most abhor are often the ones most capable of thriving within a human-made environment.

Hope has worked as a natural-resource conservator and park ranger, both of which have deeply influenced her artwork that explores themes of environmental harm, extinction, and consumerism. You can see many more of her Biodiversity Reclamation Suits in this gallery.

Concord, 2008. Cotton, silk, bamboo, wool, and acrylic. Blended yarn mannequin: basswood, acrylic paint, gouache, glass, pewter, and walnut.

Seychelles Parakeet, 2015. Crocheted yarn, handmade pigeon mannequin, walnut stand.

Urban Pigeons: Dodo II, 2014. Crocheted yarn, handmade pigeon mannequin, walnut stand.

Passenger Pigeon II, 2014. Crocheted yarn, handmade pigeon mannequin, walnut stand.

Carolina Parakeet, 2009. Crocheted yarn, hand carved pigeon mannequin, walnut stand.

Carolina Parakeet (detail)

Bachman’s Warbler, 2015. Crocheted yarn, handmade resin pigeon mannequin, walnut stand.

 

 



Art Crafts

Figural Lace Sculptures Attached to Found Wood by Agnes Herczeg

August 14, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Hungarian artist Agnes Herczeg creates figural lace works of female forms, capturing figures in moments of contemplation or work. In one piece the subject stands at a loom, appearing to weave herself from the included fibers. In each of her works Herczeg uses all natural materials, incorporating small pieces of wood or other found materials to serve as a sculpture’s bed frame, hair accessory, floating vessel, or small shelf.

Herczeg studied textile conservation at the Hungarian University of Fine Arts, and over the years has gathered several methods of embroidery and lace-making to use in her work such as needle lace, pillow lace, macramé, and more. You can purchase her lace sculptures directly from her website, both attached to found natural objects and as individual lace works. (via Metafilter)