Category: Design

The Inner Workings of Antique Calculators Dramatically Photographed by Kevin Twomey

The Inner Workings of Antique Calculators Dramatically Photographed by Kevin Twomey vintage technology machines

The Inner Workings of Antique Calculators Dramatically Photographed by Kevin Twomey vintage technology machines

The Inner Workings of Antique Calculators Dramatically Photographed by Kevin Twomey vintage technology machines

The Inner Workings of Antique Calculators Dramatically Photographed by Kevin Twomey vintage technology machines

The Inner Workings of Antique Calculators Dramatically Photographed by Kevin Twomey vintage technology machines

The Inner Workings of Antique Calculators Dramatically Photographed by Kevin Twomey vintage technology machines

The Inner Workings of Antique Calculators Dramatically Photographed by Kevin Twomey vintage technology machines

The Inner Workings of Antique Calculators Dramatically Photographed by Kevin Twomey vintage technology machines

The Inner Workings of Antique Calculators Dramatically Photographed by Kevin Twomey vintage technology machines

The Inner Workings of Antique Calculators Dramatically Photographed by Kevin Twomey vintage technology machines

The Inner Workings of Antique Calculators Dramatically Photographed by Kevin Twomey vintage technology machines

The Inner Workings of Antique Calculators Dramatically Photographed by Kevin Twomey vintage technology machines

While our modern day gadgets are certainly compact and slick, they’re also incredibly boring when compared to the intricate inner-workings of their predecessors. A small microchip now does the heavy lifting in modern day calculators. But take apart a 60-year old calculator and you’ll find hundreds of parts that include gears, axels, rods and levers all working together like a fine-oiled machine. Capturing these old gadgets is photographer Kevin Twomey, who “delights in raising the most mundane of objects to an iconic level.”

In his series simply titled “Calculators,” Twomey highlights the glory of antiquated technology by dramatically photographing the insides of old calculators. The project originally came about when Mark Glusker, a mechanical engineer and collector of old calculators, asked Twomey to photograph his collection. “The stripping of the external shell of the calculators was not the original concept for shooting these machines,” Twomey tells us, “but when Mark removed the covers to show the complex internal working of the calculators, I immediately knew that this was the heart of the project.”  The two are shopping around for a publisher, as well as an exhibition space. If you’re interested you should get in touch! (Via My Modern Met)

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Turn Boring Vegetables into Spaceships and Racecars with Le FabShop’s 3D-Printable ‘Open Toys’

Turn Boring Vegetables into Spaceships and Racecars with Le FabShops 3D Printable Open Toys toys food 3d printing

Turn Boring Vegetables into Spaceships and Racecars with Le FabShops 3D Printable Open Toys toys food 3d printing

Turn Boring Vegetables into Spaceships and Racecars with Le FabShops 3D Printable Open Toys toys food 3d printing

Turn Boring Vegetables into Spaceships and Racecars with Le FabShops 3D Printable Open Toys toys food 3d printing

Turn Boring Vegetables into Spaceships and Racecars with Le FabShops 3D Printable Open Toys toys food 3d printing

Turn Boring Vegetables into Spaceships and Racecars with Le FabShops 3D Printable Open Toys toys food 3d printing

If you’re interested in advanced techniques for playing with your food, the team at le FabShop just released a series of 14 components you can download, print, and attach to your favorite vegetable, effectively transforming turnips into helicopters and eggplants into submarines. A sort of DIY Mr. Potato Head for the 3d-printing generation. The free accessories are called Open Toys, and all 14 components can be downloaded here. If you’re looking for more 3D printed toys just in time for the holidays, check out this list from Cults. (via NOTCOT)

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New 360° Laser-Cut Paper Story Books by Yusuke Oono

New 360° Laser Cut Paper Story Books by Yusuke Oono silhouettes paper books

New 360° Laser Cut Paper Story Books by Yusuke Oono silhouettes paper books

New 360° Laser Cut Paper Story Books by Yusuke Oono silhouettes paper books

New 360° Laser Cut Paper Story Books by Yusuke Oono silhouettes paper books

New 360° Laser Cut Paper Story Books by Yusuke Oono silhouettes paper books

New 360° Laser Cut Paper Story Books by Yusuke Oono silhouettes paper books

New 360° Laser Cut Paper Story Books by Yusuke Oono silhouettes paper books

New 360° Laser Cut Paper Story Books by Yusuke Oono silhouettes paper books

New 360° Laser Cut Paper Story Books by Yusuke Oono silhouettes paper books

New 360° Laser Cut Paper Story Books by Yusuke Oono silhouettes paper books

Japanese graphic designer and architect Yusuke Oono (previously) released a trio of new laser-cut storybooks including depictions of ‘Jack in the Beanstalk’ and Mount Fuji. The books are comprised 40 images bound into a book that can be fanned out at 360° creating a narrative that can be explored from multiple angles. While these pieces seen here are one-off creations, Oono has several other folding books and lights available through Artechnica.

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How to Fold the World’s Best Paper Airplane

Back in 2012, former Cal Berkeley quarterback Joe Ayoob broke the Guinness World Record for the longest distance in paper airplane flight using a plane designed and folded by John Collins. In this video, Collins demonstrates how to fold the plane, the Suzanne. Directions for this and several additional planes can be found in his book The New World Champion Paper Airplane Book. (via Kottke)

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Architectural Landmarks Created with Bicycle Tire Tracks by Thomas Yang

Architectural Landmarks Created with Bicycle Tire Tracks by Thomas Yang tires posters and prints bicycles architecture

Architectural Landmarks Created with Bicycle Tire Tracks by Thomas Yang tires posters and prints bicycles architecture

Architectural Landmarks Created with Bicycle Tire Tracks by Thomas Yang tires posters and prints bicycles architecture

Architectural Landmarks Created with Bicycle Tire Tracks by Thomas Yang tires posters and prints bicycles architecture

Architectural Landmarks Created with Bicycle Tire Tracks by Thomas Yang tires posters and prints bicycles architecture

Architectural Landmarks Created with Bicycle Tire Tracks by Thomas Yang tires posters and prints bicycles architecture

Architectural Landmarks Created with Bicycle Tire Tracks by Thomas Yang tires posters and prints bicycles architecture

Earlier this year we mentioned Thomas Yang over at 100copies used the prints from bicycle tire treads to create a poster of the Empire State Building. Yang has since explored three additional landmarks around the world that merge his passion for cycling and architecture including depictions of the Eiffel Tower, the Tower Bridge, and China’s Forbidden City. While it appears the individual prints are sold out, they are still available as a full set. (via Arch Atlas)

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Amazing Little Flip Books Use Negative Space and Secret Compartments

Amazing Little Flip Books Use Negative Space and Secret Compartments flipbook books

Amazing Little Flip Books Use Negative Space and Secret Compartments flipbook books

Amazing Little Flip Books Use Negative Space and Secret Compartments flipbook books

These fun little flip books made in Japan feature a number of unexpected designs that make use of negative space and secret “compartments” that are gradually revealed as you flip through the books. There are several books in the series published by Mou Hitotsu no Kenkyujo and you can pick them up on Amazon. Here’s the bug one. (via Travelry)

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Explore Eight New Mind-Bending Worlds in Monument Valley’s ‘Forgotten Shores’

Explore Eight New Mind Bending Worlds in Monument Valleys Forgotten Shores video games iPhone iPad

Explore Eight New Mind Bending Worlds in Monument Valleys Forgotten Shores video games iPhone iPad

It’s rare that we stop to consider apps and video games on Colossal, but when we do, it’s with good reason. Monument Valley (previously), a gorgeously designed Escheresque puzzle game for iOS, just released eight new levels, collectively titled Forgotten Shores. Over the last few months Monument Valley has proven so popular and ground-breaking that it picked up an Apple Design Award, released a soundtrack, and turned 10 of its levels into an open edition of giclée prints. I spent some time with my six-year-old son working through Forgotten Shores last night, and it’s every bit as fun and innovative as the first release. Get it here.

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