Category: Design

Fun Typographic Metaphors Animated on a Vintage Typewriter by Greg Condon 

One of the first assignments in a beginning typography course is the creation of visual metaphors, where letterforms are somehow modified or manipulated to represent a word. In this ingenious short film by Greg Condon titled “Disillusionment of 10 Point Font” the metaphor exercise is brought to life with the help of a Smith Corona Galaxie Deluxe typewriter that he used to animate each word. Sound by One Thousand Birds. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

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An Expansive Pavilion of Architectural Elements Constructed from Wire Mesh by Edoardo Tresoldi 

All photos © Roberto Conte, courtesy the artist.

As part of a royal event in Abu Dhabi, Italian artist Edoardo Tresoldi (previously) was tasked with the creation an immense environment of architectural elements built from wire. The variety of objects fully encompass the event space, creating elegant partitions and environments within the 7,000 square meter space. The installation was designed and built over a period of 3 months in collaboration with Dubai-based studio Designlab Experience.

Lit from both above and below, the suspended wire domes, columns, and arches have a translucent ghost-like appearance, referencing classical architectural with Tresoldi’s modern aesthetic. After the event, sections of the piece are scheduled to be re-installed separately in universities, parks, and museums across the UAE capital. You can see many more of Tresoldi’s wire installations on his website.

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When TV Logos Were Physical Objects 

It goes without saying that nearly everything made with graphic design and video software was once produced using a physical process, from newspapers to TV Logos. But some TV stations and film studios took things even further and designed physical logos that were filmed to create dynamic special effects. Arguably the most famous of which is MGM’s Leo the Lion which first appeared in 1916 and would go on to include 7 different lions over the decades.

Recently, television history buff Andrew Wiseman unearthed this amazing behind-the-scenes shot of the Office de Radiodiffusion Télévision Française logo from the early 1960s that was constructed with an array of strings to provide the identity with a bright shimmer that couldn’t be accomplished with 2D drawings. The logo could also presumably be filmed from different perspectives, though there’s no evidence that was actually done.

Another famous physical TV identity was the BBC’s “globe and mirror” logo in use from 1981 to 1985 that was based on a physical device. After filming the rotating globe against a panoramic mirror, it appears the results were then traced by hand similar to rotoscoping. One of the more elaborate physical TV intro sequences was the 1983 HBO intro that despite giving the impression of being animated or created digitally was in fact built almost entirely with practical effects. You can watch a 10 minute video about how they did it below. (via Quipsologies, Reddit, Andrew Wiseman)

Update: It turns out the BBC Globe ident wasn’t rotoscoped or animated, instead it was recorded live using the Noddy camera system and the color was created by adjusting the contrast. Thanks, Gene!

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Shoe-Shi: Edible Sneakers That Combine an Artist’s Love of Footwear and Sushi 

Milan-based Yujia Hu is an artist and chef who really likes to play with his food. The 28-year-old’s newest invention is “shoe shi,” sneakers and other types of footwear crafted from rice, seaweed, and raw fish. The miniature kicks are mostly sneakers, but also include a few pairs of slip on sandals, and are each 100% edible. Every shoe takes Hu about 30 minutes to produce, and often finalizes the work by adding the logo of a recognisable brand such as Nike, Adidas, or Supreme. You can see more of his edible edible shoes on his Instagram and Facebook. (via deMilked)

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New Minimalistic Single Line Tattoos by Mo Ganji 

With a single delicate black line, Berlin-based tattoo artist Mo Ganji (previously) creates the faces of intertwined portraits, the details of flying birds, and the forms of running animals. Each tattoo relies on an unbroken line that varies only slightly in thickness as it weaves in and out of each image, sometimes accompanied by a few accent dots. Seen here is a collection of pieces from the last year, and Ganji shares more new works on Instagram.

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Wood Tables and Wall Art Embedded with Glass Rivers and Lakes by Greg Klassen 

Inspired by his daily experience of life in the Pacific Northwest, artist and designer Greg Klassen (previously) fabricates one-of-a-kind tables featuring blue glass rivers, lakes, and waterfalls. The topographical studies mimic bodies of water seen from an aerial view, but the twisting blue pathways are often defined by the wood pieces he selects. While the majority of Klassen’s work serves as functional art, he’s also begun to create more isolated wood and glass sculptures mounted on walls.

Several of Klassen’s most recent tables are available through his online shop, and you can explore more pieces from the last few years on Instagram and Facebook.

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