Category: Design

Rainbow Drip Vessels by Brian Giniewski Ceramics 

Ceramic artist Brian Giniewski produces delightful earthenware vessels that appear to be oozing thick, colorful drips that are frozen in time. The Philadelphia-based ceramicist achieves the texture of the vases and bowls by applying a gritty, matte slip to each piece which contrasts nicely with a special glossy glaze made to melt into drips during the firing process. Giniewski is currently Kickstarting a move into a new studio space and is offering a variety of unique objects. You can see more of his work on Instagram and in his online shop.

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A Fold Apart: A NASA Physicist Turned Origami Artist 

In 2001 NASA physicist Robert Lang quit his job to focus on his one true passion: creating original origami designs. With a deep understanding of mathematics and materials, Lang’s folding designs have been incorporated into everything from spacecraft to airbags. His works aren’t limited to functional objects, he’s also produced a wide range of original artworks that have been exhibited around the world. The Great Big Story recently sat down with Lang for this brief interview. (via Uncrate)

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New Reusable Adhesive Tape Makes Any Surface Instantly Compatible with LEGO Bricks 

We all know that the world can’t get enough LEGO, but if this handy LEGO tape is any indicator, soon we won’t be able to find enough places to put it. Created by Cape Town-based designers Anine Kirsten and Max Basler, Nimuno Loops are a reusable adhesive tape that turns any surface into a base for LEGO projects. Think: walls, glass windows, ceilings, or irregularly shaped objects can all suddenly become a starting point for building with LEGOs. You can also build around corners, or even slap additional components onto the sides of existing LEGO creations. Nimuno Loops are currently funding on Indiegogo and they’ve raised almost $700,000 as of this writing, handily surpassing their goal by 8,575%. (via Designboom, Creators Project, and basically the rest of the entire internet)

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Rock Band: An Electromechanical Sound Machine That Makes Music With Rocks 

A rolling stone gathers no moss as they say, but this collection of stones manipulated by electromechanical devices are capable of performing George Harrison’s “Here Comes the Sun” thanks to artist Neil Mendoza. Titled Rock Band, this kinetic sound art installation is actually four different instruments including a xylophone, a buzzing base, two spinners, and a pair of slappers. Mendoza describes how each device works:

Xylophone: Inside each of the tubes is a small pebble. When the Teensy receives a note for this instrument, it triggers a solenoid (electromagnet), to launch the pebble up a tube and strike a key. For the design of this piece, I wrote a piece of software that calculated the size each key needed to be to produce the appropriate frequency and then cut them out using a water jet cutter.

Bass: This is the small marble circle in the front. When the Teensy receives a note for this one, it causes the plunger of a solenoid (electromagnet) to vibrate at the frequency of the appropriate musical note against the rock.

Spinners: These are the two large objects on either side and are percussive. Inside each of these, there are two magnets attached to each end of a shaft. On the outside, there are two magnetic rocks, Hematite, that are attracted to the magnets on the inside. When a note is received, the shaft spins and one of the rocks is guided away from its magnet and launched through the air. It lands on a piece of marble that has been cut to size to fit in the machine.

Slapper: These slap the rocks with pieces of fake leather and provide some light percussion.

All of the machines were built at Autodesk’s Pier 9 workshop in San Francisco as part of their artist in residence program. You can see more of Mendoza’s mechanical works on his website.

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Elegant Wooden Birds Dipped in Watercolor Plumage by Moisés Hernández 

Immersed Birds, 2017. Ash and watercolor.

Mexican designer Moisés Hernández brings his distinct flair for minimalism to this new series of avian sculptures titled Immersed Birds. Each piece is a continuous wooden object milled with CNC technology which is then dipped into a carefully considered sequence of watercolors. The overlaying hues mimic the plumage of a toucan, hummingbird, and Mexican quetzal. You can see more of Hernández’s work on Instagram. (via Booooooom)

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The Shaolin Flying Monks Temple Blasts Monks Into the Sky Above a Mountainside Amphitheater 

All photos by Ansis Starks, courtesy Mailitis Architects

Perched on the Songshan mountain in rural Henan, China, this new temple designed by Latvian architecture studio Mailītis Architects brings a whole new perspective to the legendary Shaolin monks: specifically an aerial perspective. The recently completed Shaolin Flying Monks Temple contains a one-of-a-kind levitation pavilion that houses a vertical wind tunnel designed in part by Aerodium that blasts participants toward the sky in the center of a 230-seat amphitheater.

“The concept is to tell the history of Zen and Kung-Fu through artistic performances and architectural image of the building itself,” says Mailītis. “It serves as a metaphor for mountain and trees and was inspired by Songshan mountain – the natural environment for monks to develop their skills.”

You can see more photos of the new landmark building on Mailītis Architects’ website. (via Dezeen)

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