Category: Design

DIY Kinetic Origami Sculpture Designed by Jo Nakashima

DIY Kinetic Origami Sculpture Designed by Jo Nakashima paper origami kinetic sculpture

Partially inspired by Erik Åberg’s interlocking kinetic cube system Ghostcubes, Brasil-based origami artist Jo Nakashima created a method for building a similar object using a system of 40 paper cubes. For those of you ambitious enough to give it a try he shared a set of instructions on Instructables. Just 45 steps!

If you’re not familiar with Nakashima, he runs the most popular instructional origami channel on YouTube, with some of his videos racking up over 13 million views. (via Instructables)

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Cycling Activists Build Bamboo Car Skeletons to Demonstrate Space Taken by Single Occupancy Cars

Cycling Activists Build Bamboo Car Skeletons to Demonstrate Space Taken by Single Occupancy Cars public transportation cycling bicycles bamboo activism

Cycling Activists Build Bamboo Car Skeletons to Demonstrate Space Taken by Single Occupancy Cars public transportation cycling bicycles bamboo activism

Cycling Activists Build Bamboo Car Skeletons to Demonstrate Space Taken by Single Occupancy Cars public transportation cycling bicycles bamboo activism

Cycling Activists Build Bamboo Car Skeletons to Demonstrate Space Taken by Single Occupancy Cars public transportation cycling bicycles bamboo activism

Cycling Activists Build Bamboo Car Skeletons to Demonstrate Space Taken by Single Occupancy Cars public transportation cycling bicycles bamboo activism

A few Latvian activists from a branch of the bicycle advocacy group Let’s Bike it recently created a visual reminder of the space taken by cars on a typical road. To accomplish this, the group fabricated bamboo skeletons shaped like actual cars and mounted them on their bikes. The activists then cycled around the streets of Riga for several hours to highlight the absurdity of using a large car to move a single person. The stunt was organized as part of European Mobility Week, an ongoing campaign that explores sustainable urban mobility around Europe. (via Designboom, My Modern Met)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

Movable Footbridge in Paddington, London Opens and Closes Like a Fan

Movable Footbridge in Paddington, London Opens and Closes Like a Fan bridges

Movable Footbridge in Paddington, London Opens and Closes Like a Fan bridges

Photographs by Edmund Sumner & Peter Cook, Courtesy Knight Architects

Movable Footbridge in Paddington, London Opens and Closes Like a Fan bridges

Movable Footbridge in Paddington, London Opens and Closes Like a Fan bridges

Movable Footbridge in Paddington, London Opens and Closes Like a Fan bridges

London bridge is not falling down. It’s folding up. Taking their cue from the way a Japanese hand fan folds open, Knight Architects have completed a bridge in London that is both simple and spectacular. In collaboration with structural engineers AKT II, the bridge experts installed 5 steel beams that open and close in sequence, rising to different angles using hydraulic jacks and assisted by counterweights. “Beautiful, efficient bridge design should satisfy both artistic and scientific analysis to be visually legible and structurally truthful,” say the architects. The moving footbridge bridge is located in Paddington, London and spans the 20-meter width of the Grand Union Canal. (via Dezeen)

See related posts on Colossal about .

Yoga Joes: Plastic Green Soldiers Practicing Yoga

Yoga Joes: Plastic Green Soldiers Practicing Yoga yoga toys humor armed forces

Yoga Joes: Plastic Green Soldiers Practicing Yoga yoga toys humor armed forces

Yoga Joes: Plastic Green Soldiers Practicing Yoga yoga toys humor armed forces

Yoga Joes: Plastic Green Soldiers Practicing Yoga yoga toys humor armed forces

We’ve seen plenty of modern takes on classic green army guys as of late, from skateboarders and surfers over at Toy Boarders, to an array of plastic breakdancing people. Yoga practitioner and entrepreneur Dan Abramson now joins the fray with Yoga Joes, a collection of green army figures doing popular yoga poses like the warrior, cobra, and downward-facing dog. The project is currently funding on Kickstarter and sets should ship in time for Christmas. Hurry, there’s only 4 days left. (via FastCo, My Modern Met)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Deconstructed Bird and Insect Wing Patterns by Eleanor Lutz

Deconstructed Bird and Insect Wing Patterns by Eleanor Lutz posters and prints infographics flight birds

Deconstructed Bird and Insect Wing Patterns by Eleanor Lutz posters and prints infographics flight birds

Artist and designer Eleanor Lutz has a special knack for science illustration. On her blog, Tabletop Whale, she recently shared this great series of admittedly non-scientific charts that deconstruct the wing patterns of birds and insects. After spreading across the web like wildfire the last few days she quickly turned it into a print available through Artsider. (via Kottke)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Florian Pucher Turns Aerial Photos into Plush Carpeting

Florian Pucher Turns Aerial Photos into Plush Carpeting carpets aerial

LANDCARPET Bahamas

Florian Pucher Turns Aerial Photos into Plush Carpeting carpets aerial

LANDCARPET Bahamas (detail)

Florian Pucher Turns Aerial Photos into Plush Carpeting carpets aerial

LANDCARPET Bahamas (detail)

Florian Pucher Turns Aerial Photos into Plush Carpeting carpets aerial

LANDCARPET Hong Kong

Florian Pucher Turns Aerial Photos into Plush Carpeting carpets aerial

LANDCARPET Hong Kong (detail)

Florian Pucher Turns Aerial Photos into Plush Carpeting carpets aerial

LANDCARPET Hong Kong (detail)

Florian Pucher Turns Aerial Photos into Plush Carpeting carpets aerial

LANDCARPET Netherlands (detail)

Florian Pucher Turns Aerial Photos into Plush Carpeting carpets aerial

LANDCARPET Netherlands (detail)

Florian Pucher Turns Aerial Photos into Plush Carpeting carpets aerial

LANDCARPET USA

Florian Pucher Turns Aerial Photos into Plush Carpeting carpets aerial

LANDCARPET USA (detail)

From a young age Florian Pucher was always fascinated by landscapes underneath and how blissful and beautiful our world looks from above. “I have always loved to travel and tried to always get window seats on planes,” said the Beijing-based Austrian architect who even avoided travelling by night in order to see as many different landscapes as possible. Pucher is now turning his childhood obsession into LANDCARPET: a series of rugs modeled after birds-eye-view aerial photographs of land.

Pucher uses various online mapping services to pinpoint locations of interest and then does picture searches to get a feel for the colors and elevations. He sometimes coincidentally will stumble upon satellite imagery or maps, which may lead to a new rug design. “Some countries are very easily recognizable through their methods of farming and that has always intrigued me,” Pucher tells us. “Furthermore as an architect and master planner I constantly get to see and look through site surveys, aerial images and city plans which have further sharpened my eye for distinguishable patterns and different layers.”

Pucher’s LANDCARPETs are signed and hand tufted in limited editions of 88 pieces. You can purchase one directly through his website. (via Yatzer)

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Digital Artist Giuseppe Randazzo Creates Elaborate Arrays of 3D-Printed Stones

Digital Artist Giuseppe Randazzo Creates Elaborate Arrays of 3D Printed Stones rocks digital 3d printing
Stone Field 00 / exp00 – simple attractor exponential field. Digital rendering.

Digital Artist Giuseppe Randazzo Creates Elaborate Arrays of 3D Printed Stones rocks digital 3d printing
Stone Field 05 / three attractors field. Digital rendering.

Digital Artist Giuseppe Randazzo Creates Elaborate Arrays of 3D Printed Stones rocks digital 3d printing
Stone Field 04 / field based on vert dist from horizontal axis. Digital rendering.

Digital Artist Giuseppe Randazzo Creates Elaborate Arrays of 3D Printed Stones rocks digital 3d printing
StoneFields 02 / polar 2d Perlin field. 3D-printed sculpture.

Digital Artist Giuseppe Randazzo Creates Elaborate Arrays of 3D Printed Stones rocks digital 3d printing
Stone Field 00 / exp00 – simple attractor exponential field. 3D-printed sculpture.

Digital Artist Giuseppe Randazzo Creates Elaborate Arrays of 3D Printed Stones rocks digital 3d printing
Stone Field 07 /simple 1d linear polar field. 3D-printed sculpture.

Digital Artist Giuseppe Randazzo Creates Elaborate Arrays of 3D Printed Stones rocks digital 3d printing
Stone Field 07 /simple 1d linear polar field. 3D-printed sculpture, detail.

Back in 2009, Italian designer Giuseppe Randazzo of Novastructura released a series of generative digital “sculptures” that depicted carefully organized pebbles and rocks on a flat plane. Titled Stone Fields, the works were inspired in part by similar land art pieces by English sculptor Richard Long. As the images spread around the web (pre-dating this publication entirely) many people were somewhat disheartened to learn the images were created with software instead of tweezers, a testament to Randazzo’s C++ programming skills used to create a custom application that rendered 3D files based on a number of parameters.

Fast forward to 2014, and technology has finally caught up with Randazzo’s original vision. The designer recently teamed up with Shapeways to create physical prototypes of the Stone Fields project. He shares about the process:

Starting from 2009 project “Stone Fields”, some 3dmodels were produced from the original meshes. The conversion was rather difficult, the initial models weren’t created with 3dprinting in mind. The handling of millions of triangles and the check for errors required a complex process. Each model is 25cm x 25cm wide and was produced by Shapeways in polyamide (white strong & flexible). Subsequently they were painted with airbrush. [...] The minute details of the original meshes were by far too tiny to be printed, however despite the small scale, these prototypes give an idea of the complexity of the gradients of artificial stones.

Watch the video above to see the sculptures up close, and you can see a few more photos over on Randazzo’s project site. If you liked this, also check out Lee Griggs.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Page 1 of 1321234...»