Category: Design

A 1,000-piece CMYK Color Gamut Jigsaw Puzzle by Clemens Habicht

A 1,000 piece CMYK Color Gamut Jigsaw Puzzle by Clemens Habicht toys puzzles color

A 1,000 piece CMYK Color Gamut Jigsaw Puzzle by Clemens Habicht toys puzzles color

A 1,000 piece CMYK Color Gamut Jigsaw Puzzle by Clemens Habicht toys puzzles color

A 1,000 piece CMYK Color Gamut Jigsaw Puzzle by Clemens Habicht toys puzzles color

A 1,000 piece CMYK Color Gamut Jigsaw Puzzle by Clemens Habicht toys puzzles color

This 1,000-piece jigsaw puzzle contains exactly 1,000 different colors arranged in the form of a CMYK gamut and is guaranteed to drive you insane. The creator of the 1,000 Colors puzzle, Clemens Habicht, suggests the puzzle is actually easier than traditional image-based puzzles. When faced with a field of color, he says the placement of every piece becomes almost intuitive.

The idea came from enjoying the subtle differences in the blue of a sky in a particularly brutal jigsaw puzzle, I found that without the presence of image detail to help locate a piece I was relying only on an intuitive sense of colour, and this was much more satisfying to do than the areas with image details.

What is strange is that unlike ordinary puzzles where you are in effect redrawing a specific picture from a reference you have a sense of where every piece belongs compared to every other piece. There is a real logic in the doing that is weirdly soothing, therapeutic, it must be the German coming out in me. As each piece clicks perfectly into place, just so, it’s a little win, like a little pat on the back.

The 1,000 Colors puzzle ships from Australia and costs about $33 (about $58 with shipping to the U.S.). (via Boing Boing)

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Wood Tables Embedded with Photoluminescent Resin by Mike Warren

Wood Tables Embedded with Photoluminescent Resin by Mike Warren wood resin furniture

Wood Tables Embedded with Photoluminescent Resin by Mike Warren wood resin furniture

Wood Tables Embedded with Photoluminescent Resin by Mike Warren wood resin furniture

Back in August, industrial designer Mat Brown shared a method for creating wood shelves inlaid with glow-in-the-dark resin. Not to be outdone, Mike Warren just released a tutorial of how to fill the naturally formed voids in pecky cypress with photoluminescent powder mixed with clear casting resin. The effect is pretty amazing. To see how he did it you can watch video above or read through Warren’s step-by-step instructions over on Instructables. (via NOTCOT)

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Traffic Light That Lets You Play Pong with Person on the Other Side Officially Installed in Germany

Traffic Light That Lets You Play Pong with Person on the Other Side Officially Installed in Germany video games urban intervention safety public interactive Germany

Traffic Light That Lets You Play Pong with Person on the Other Side Officially Installed in Germany video games urban intervention safety public interactive Germany

Traffic Light That Lets You Play Pong with Person on the Other Side Officially Installed in Germany video games urban intervention safety public interactive Germany

Back in 2012, a trio of interaction design students from HAWK University unveiled a concept for StreetPong, an interactive game of pong installed at a street crossing that allows you to play opponents waiting on the other side. The concept video (above) was viewed a bajillion times around the web, compelling designers Amelie Künzler, Sandro Angel, and Holger Michel to work with design firms and traffic experts to build a fully-functional device. After two years of waiting, the game units have been designed and approved for use by the city of Hildesheim, Germany where they were installed two weeks ago. Rebranded as the ActiWait, the devices aren’t just a clever way to pass the time while waiting for cars, hopefully they disuade impatient pedestrians from darting through traffic. (via Pop-Up City, @Staublfuse, Stellar)

Update: ActiWait currently has an Indiegogo campaign to help raise funds for further development.

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Lumino City: A Handmade Paper Video Game by State of Play

For nearly three years, a six-member team of developers called State of Play has been toiling away in a London studio making a new video game. While there are probably thousands of such teams around the world coding away into the night, the members of this team are a bit different. Among them are an architect, a photographer, and a model maker, all needed to help physically construct the game’s environment. Titled Lumino City, the entire video game was first handmade entirely out of paper, card, miniature lights and motors.

While many games appropriate paper textures or have some kind of paper aesthetic, State of Play took things one step further and built the sets for each puzzle, photographed or filmed them, and then set everything in motion with code. The result is a breathtakingly beautiful puzzle game starring an intrepid girl who tries to solve the mystery of her missing grandfather. After an hour or so of extensive research I can confirm the game is amazing. Lumino City is available for the Mac and PC, and is coming very soon to iOS. You can read a bit more over on The Verge.

Lumino City: A Handmade Paper Video Game by State of Play video games paper

Lumino City: A Handmade Paper Video Game by State of Play video games paper

Lumino City: A Handmade Paper Video Game by State of Play video games paper

Lumino City: A Handmade Paper Video Game by State of Play video games paper

Lumino City: A Handmade Paper Video Game by State of Play video games paper

Lumino City: A Handmade Paper Video Game by State of Play video games paper

Lumino City: A Handmade Paper Video Game by State of Play video games paper

Lumino City: A Handmade Paper Video Game by State of Play video games paper

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How to Build the World’s Simplest Electric Train

How to Build the Worlds Simplest Electric Train trains magnets electricity batteries

The AmazingScience YouTube channel demonstrates how to build a ridiculously simple electric “train” with the help of a few magnets, a battery, and a copper coil. You can also use the same materials to build a little spinning motor-like contraption. (via Twisted Sifter)

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Artist Charles Young Is Building a Vast Paper City, One Tiny Model at a Time

Artist Charles Young Is Building a Vast Paper City, One Tiny Model at a Time paper architecture

Artist Charles Young Is Building a Vast Paper City, One Tiny Model at a Time paper architecture

Artist Charles Young Is Building a Vast Paper City, One Tiny Model at a Time paper architecture

Artist Charles Young Is Building a Vast Paper City, One Tiny Model at a Time paper architecture

Artist Charles Young Is Building a Vast Paper City, One Tiny Model at a Time paper architecture Artist Charles Young Is Building a Vast Paper City, One Tiny Model at a Time paper architecture

Artist Charles Young Is Building a Vast Paper City, One Tiny Model at a Time paper architecture

Artist Charles Young Is Building a Vast Paper City, One Tiny Model at a Time paper architecture

Artist Charles Young Is Building a Vast Paper City, One Tiny Model at a Time paper architecture

Artist Charles Young Is Building a Vast Paper City, One Tiny Model at a Time paper architecture

One of my favorite new Tumblrs to follow is Paperholm, a project that started this summer by Charles Young who challenged himself to build a new paper structure each day. Young received his bachelor and masters degrees from the Edinburgh College of Art where he taught himself paper and card modelling. Despite a long-time familiarity with the process and materials, it’s amazing to see the progress he’s made in just the last three months or so as the models become more intricate and lend themselves to bits of animation. You can follow Young’s growing paper city here. (via My Modern Met)

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The Inner Workings of Antique Calculators Dramatically Photographed by Kevin Twomey

The Inner Workings of Antique Calculators Dramatically Photographed by Kevin Twomey vintage technology machines

The Inner Workings of Antique Calculators Dramatically Photographed by Kevin Twomey vintage technology machines

The Inner Workings of Antique Calculators Dramatically Photographed by Kevin Twomey vintage technology machines

The Inner Workings of Antique Calculators Dramatically Photographed by Kevin Twomey vintage technology machines

The Inner Workings of Antique Calculators Dramatically Photographed by Kevin Twomey vintage technology machines

The Inner Workings of Antique Calculators Dramatically Photographed by Kevin Twomey vintage technology machines

The Inner Workings of Antique Calculators Dramatically Photographed by Kevin Twomey vintage technology machines

The Inner Workings of Antique Calculators Dramatically Photographed by Kevin Twomey vintage technology machines

The Inner Workings of Antique Calculators Dramatically Photographed by Kevin Twomey vintage technology machines

The Inner Workings of Antique Calculators Dramatically Photographed by Kevin Twomey vintage technology machines

The Inner Workings of Antique Calculators Dramatically Photographed by Kevin Twomey vintage technology machines

The Inner Workings of Antique Calculators Dramatically Photographed by Kevin Twomey vintage technology machines

While our modern day gadgets are certainly compact and slick, they’re also incredibly boring when compared to the intricate inner-workings of their predecessors. A small microchip now does the heavy lifting in modern day calculators. But take apart a 60-year old calculator and you’ll find hundreds of parts that include gears, axels, rods and levers all working together like a fine-oiled machine. Capturing these old gadgets is photographer Kevin Twomey, who “delights in raising the most mundane of objects to an iconic level.”

In his series simply titled “Calculators,” Twomey highlights the glory of antiquated technology by dramatically photographing the insides of old calculators. The project originally came about when Mark Glusker, a mechanical engineer and collector of old calculators, asked Twomey to photograph his collection. “The stripping of the external shell of the calculators was not the original concept for shooting these machines,” Twomey tells us, “but when Mark removed the covers to show the complex internal working of the calculators, I immediately knew that this was the heart of the project.”  The two are shopping around for a publisher, as well as an exhibition space. If you’re interested you should get in touch! (Via My Modern Met)

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