Category: Design

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

From the series “Lost & Found”

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

From the series “Lost & Found” | detail

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Against the Wind”

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Against the Wind” | detail

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Against the Wind” | detail

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Derweze”

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Derweze” | detail

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Derweze” | detail

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Rabie” | Spring, breeze in Arabic

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Rabie” | detail

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Rabie” | detail

The Sydney, Australia-based artist Gunjan Aylawadi creates intricate, colorful sculptures that appear to resemble woven textiles. However, upon closer observation, her work—inspired by patterns and motifs in Islamic art—are made entirely from curled paper. The process, long and intricate, can cost the artist months on a single artwork. And not just any old paper will do. For example, “Against the Wind” is made from hand-cut strips of paper from old music books, which are then individually hand rolled and assembled. Although complicated, Aylawadi’s reasons for making art are simple: “What I enjoy most about making my work is the experience people have when they look at it,” she says. “They stop for a moment to have a closer look and the moment turns into long minutes of being fascinated by the beauty a simple medium like paper can add to the work infront of their eyes.” (via Lustik)

Bears on Stairs: A Stop Motion-Animation Created from 3D-Printed Frames

Bears on Stairs: A Stop Motion Animation Created from 3D Printed Frames stop motion bears animation 3d printing

Bears on Stairs: A Stop Motion Animation Created from 3D Printed Frames stop motion bears animation 3d printing

Bears on Stairs: A Stop Motion Animation Created from 3D Printed Frames stop motion bears animation 3d printing

The creative team over at London-based DBLG recently released this in-house animation titled Bears on Stairs that involed old school stop motion techniques paired with modern 3D printing. The painstaking process involved printing a sequence of 50 tiny sculptures which had to be photographed one by one over a period of 4 weeks—all for a mere two seconds of animation. I love the texture on the surface created by the printer. See more over at DBLG. (via Visual News)

Step Inside an Interactive M.C. Escher Drawing with Monument Valley

Step Inside an Interactive M.C. Escher Drawing with Monument Valley video games iPhone iPad

Step Inside an Interactive M.C. Escher Drawing with Monument Valley video games iPhone iPad

Step Inside an Interactive M.C. Escher Drawing with Monument Valley video games iPhone iPad

The hype surrounding the new iOS game Monument Valley by ustwo has been almost impossible to ignore the last few days, and after downloading the puzzle game last night I was able to see why after about 30 seconds of playing. This is simply unlike any game that has come before it. Heavily influenced by the drawings of M.C. Escher the game is so aesthetically beautiful the developers include an in-game camera that lets you take pictures you can share as you play. But this game isn’t just about pretty architectural landscapes, the gameplay is as entertaining as it is brilliant—instantaneous changes of perspective and gravity propel the game forward in unexpected ways. You can download it here. If you enjoyed this also check out other minimalist games like Rymdkapsel or LIMBO.

Camera Enthusiast Builds a Coffee Shop Shaped Like an Enormous Rolleiflex Camera

Camera Enthusiast Builds a Coffee Shop Shaped Like an Enormous Rolleiflex Camera South Korea coffee cameras architecture

Camera Enthusiast Builds a Coffee Shop Shaped Like an Enormous Rolleiflex Camera South Korea coffee cameras architecture

Camera Enthusiast Builds a Coffee Shop Shaped Like an Enormous Rolleiflex Camera South Korea coffee cameras architecture

Camera Enthusiast Builds a Coffee Shop Shaped Like an Enormous Rolleiflex Camera South Korea coffee cameras architecture

Camera Enthusiast Builds a Coffee Shop Shaped Like an Enormous Rolleiflex Camera South Korea coffee cameras architecture

I’m not sure what part of this story I enjoy more: the fact that there’s a two-story building somewhere in the world that’s constructed to look like a giant Rolleiflex Camera; that the walk-in camera doubles as a coffee shop and miniature camera museum; or that the entire endeavor is the brainchild of a former helicopter pilot for the South Korean airforce. Located about 60 miles east of Seoul, South Korea, The Dreamy Camera should be high on the list for any coffee or camera enthusiast heading to the area. Check out more photos and info over on their blog. (via Peta Pixel, DIY Photography)

Street Eraser: Giant Stickers Appear to Erase the Streets of London with Photoshop

Street Eraser: Giant Stickers Appear to Erase the Streets of London with Photoshop street art stickers photoshop London erasers

Street Eraser: Giant Stickers Appear to Erase the Streets of London with Photoshop street art stickers photoshop London erasers

Street Eraser: Giant Stickers Appear to Erase the Streets of London with Photoshop street art stickers photoshop London erasers

Street Eraser: Giant Stickers Appear to Erase the Streets of London with Photoshop street art stickers photoshop London erasers

Street Eraser: Giant Stickers Appear to Erase the Streets of London with Photoshop street art stickers photoshop London erasers

Street Eraser: Giant Stickers Appear to Erase the Streets of London with Photoshop street art stickers photoshop London erasers

For their Street Eraser project artists Tayfun Sarier and Guus ter Beek (who both work at Wieden+Kennedy) created giant adhesive stickers that look like the eraser tool in Photoshop. Once applied to advertisements, graffiti and other objects it appears as if the surface is being erased, revealing Photoshop’s checkerboard background signifying a blank canvas. Fun! (via Designboom)

Anatomical 3D Self-Portrait by Joshua Harker

Anatomical 3D Self Portrait by Joshua Harker sculpture portraits anatomy

Anatomical 3D Self Portrait by Joshua Harker sculpture portraits anatomy

Anatomical 3D Self Portrait by Joshua Harker sculpture portraits anatomy

Anatomical 3D Self Portrait by Joshua Harker sculpture portraits anatomy

Anatomical 3D Self Portrait by Joshua Harker sculpture portraits anatomy

Anatomical 3D Self Portrait by Joshua Harker sculpture portraits anatomy

Chicago-based artist Joshua Harker recently unveiled this 3D-printed sculptural self-portrait titled 21st Century Self-Portrait. Harker utilized a 3D scan of his face and a CT scan of his skull to form the components which were coupled with his trademark filigree aesthetic found in some of his other artworks (you might remember his Crania Anatomica Filigre project a while back, a piece now in his shop). 21st Century Self-Portrait was first shown at 3D Printshow in New York back in February. If you’re interested, Harker is now making custom printed masks based on your own 3D facial scan. (via Street Anatomy, Laughing Squid)

Smiley Face Screws by Yuma Kano

Smiley Face Screws by Yuma Kano tools humor

Smiley Face Screws by Yuma Kano tools humor

Smiley Face Screws by Yuma Kano tools humor

Smiley Face Screws by Yuma Kano tools humor

The next time you grab the toolbox for a quick home improvement project, forget boring old flat or Phillips head screws, these happiness-inducing screws are guaranteed to put a smile on your load bearing beam. Screw :) is a collaborative project between Japanese designer Yuma Kano and a screw factory called Komuro Seisakusho in East Osaka, Japan. Kano began thinking about the potential to infuse emotion into small, ubiquitous objects like screws, the design of which has rarely changed since its invention. Of course smiley face screws aren’t meant as a replacement for more standard designs, but would make a fun detail for smaller projects or areas where a screw might be more visible. You can see much more over on his website. (via NOTCOT, Designboom)

The Beauty of Japan’s Artistic Manhole Covers

The Beauty of Japans Artistic Manhole Covers manholes Japan illustration
All photos courtesy S. Morita

The Beauty of Japans Artistic Manhole Covers manholes Japan illustration

The Beauty of Japans Artistic Manhole Covers manholes Japan illustration

The Beauty of Japans Artistic Manhole Covers manholes Japan illustration

The Beauty of Japans Artistic Manhole Covers manholes Japan illustration

The Beauty of Japans Artistic Manhole Covers manholes Japan illustration

The Beauty of Japans Artistic Manhole Covers manholes Japan illustration

The Beauty of Japans Artistic Manhole Covers manholes Japan illustration

The Beauty of Japans Artistic Manhole Covers manholes Japan illustration

The Beauty of Japans Artistic Manhole Covers manholes Japan illustration

Japan is a country full of amazing art. Some of it is housed within museums and galleries while others are right underneath our feet. I’m talking, of course, about Japan’s peculiar obsession with manhole covers. Just about anywhere in the country you can find stylized manhole covers, each more beautiful and intricate than the next. For the past several years photographer S. Morita has traveled around Japan photographing artistic manhole covers.

As to why this phenomenon developed, signs point to a high-ranking bureaucrat in the construction ministry who, in 1985, came up with the idea of allowing municipalities to design their own manhole covers. His objective was to raise awareness for costly sewage projects and make them more palatable for taxpayers.

Thanks to a few design contests and subsequent publications, the manhole craze took off and municipalities were soon competing with each other to see who could come up with the best designs. According to the Japan Society of Manhole Covers (yes, that’s a thing) today there are almost 6000 artistic manhole covers throughout Japan. And according to their latest findings, the largest single category are trees, followed by landscapes, floral designs and birds – all symbols that could, and surely did, boost local appeal.

You can see hundreds more of Morita’s photos right here. (via A Green Thought in a Green Shade)

Update: Remo Camerota has an entire book on the design of Japanese manhole covers, aptly titled Drainspotting.

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