Design

Section



Design Photography

A Half Century of Bowling Alley Design in Southern Germany Captured by Robert Götzfried

October 10, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

German photographer Robert Götzfried (previously) seeks out unique architecture for series that focus on one particular element of a culture or place. Previous projects have documented the pipe organs of 20 German Catholic churches, observed the creative construction of Cambodia’s roadside barber shops, and captured abandoned storefronts that exist across Australia.

For the last few years Götzfried has focused on photographing the design of bowling alleys and “Kegelbahnen” across Southern Germany, most of which exist from the ’60s, ’70s, and ’80s. Kegeln is a German sport similar to bowling, however with smaller balls, only nine pins, and shortened lanes. The sport has fallen from popularity, and many of the photographed lanes’ quality has diminished with the times. You can see a larger selection of Götzfried’s photographic projects on his websiteInstagram, and Behance. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 



Design

This Resin and Fiberglass Table by Harow Replicates the Surface of the Moon

October 6, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski


Using digital files pulled from NASA’s archives, French design studio Harow designed a table that replicates the real topology of the moon’s surface. The Apollo 11 Table features a sculpted fiberglass slab in the form of a lunar crater. Covering this thick segment is a layer of resin, which allows one to fully view its dips and crevices while providing coverage to the uneven terrain. The brass and aluminum alloy feet also pay homage to the many Apollo missions, parts that put a modern spin on the Lunar Excursion Module‘s original landing pads.

You can view more of Harow’s designs, including these Apollo landing wall works, on their website and Instagram. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 



Design

Twenty-One Colorful Cubes Compose Denmark’s Newly Opened Lego House

October 5, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

After four years of construction, Denmark’s colorful LEGO House has finally been unveiled to the public in the company’s native land of Billund. The building, designed by the Copenhagen and New York-based design firm Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), is composed of 21 large, white cubes which each contain a colorfully painted roof. This “stack” is topped by an oversized LEGO brick, an oblong keystone which contains eight skylights that peer into the building below.

The structure is color-coded to correspond to four experience sections which encourage visitors to explore their creativity in different aspects of learning and play. The red section is for creative skills, blue utilizes cognitive abilities, green engages social interaction, and yellow contains activities aimed at emotion. In addition to these zones there are also three restaurants, a store, a 6,500 square foot public square, and two exhibition areas that display creations built by fans and works that explore the history of LEGO.

You can explore more images of the new interactive center on its website. (via Designboom)

 

 



Crafts Design

Miniature Paper Plants by Raya Sader Bujana

October 5, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Paper artist Raya Sader Bujana (previously) has been producing a new series of tiny paper flowers and cacti encased by miniature glass terrariums, each measuring only 4cm high. You can see more on Instagram and a few are available in her Etsy Shop.

 

 



Art Design Photography

Pass Seamlessly Through the Walls of an Abandoned Building in this Photographic 3D Reconstruction by Oddviz

October 5, 2017

Christopher Jobson

El Orfelinato is the latest experimental visualization from digital artist Erdal Inci (previously) as part of an artist collective he co-founded called Oddviz with Çağrı Taşkın and Serkan Kaptan. The video piece captures an abandoned Jewish orphanage building in Ortaköy, Istanbul, through thousands of photos and 3D scans and then reconstructs it digitally, allowing the viewer to pass digitally through the walls while seeing a complete photographic representation of the building. The piece is a follow-up to a similar work from a few months ago titled Hotel.

 

 



Design

Preserve Botanical Finds and Other Travel Specimens With This Unique Japanese Stationery

October 4, 2017

Johnny Strategy

Did you go anywhere fun and inspiring this summer? Did you wish you could share a piece of the experience with someone? Well now you can with this one-of-a kind mailing card that comes with a specimen window.

Share a piece of your travels—a leaf, a newspaper clipping, a flower petal, a tag, a ticket—by inserting the specimen between the plastic sheets to hold it in place. Add some text and your card transforms into a tiny museum dedicated to telling a story from your travels.

The card was designed by Tokyo-based illustrator Haruka Shinji, who knows a thing or two about traveling. She grew up in Seoul and Shanghai before moving to London for college. After graduating from Royal College of Art she moved back to Tokyo. Her idea for the card won an award in a paper card design competition, and was then produced by the Tokyo-based Fukunaga Print.

You can find the Preserve Your Travel Card in the Spoon & Tamago shop. (Synidcated from Spoon & Tamago)

 

 



Design

Anatomical Fish Zip Bags by Japanese Designer Keiko Otsuhata

September 29, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Japanese designer Keiko Otsuhata has brought a new dimension to the popularity of fish as food by turning the sea creature into a functional-out-of-water zip bag. In Japan, fried fish (especially mackerel) is often seen on bar menus, and is prepared by splitting the fish through its stomach and frying it flat. The sight of fried fish is common visual vocabulary in Japan, but Otsuhata was curious about what the fish looked like in its pre-fried state, so she bought one from the grocery store, took photographs, and made it into a zip bag.

Tokyo-based Otsuhata is also a writer for the Japanese website Daily Portal Z, where she often shares her creative process as she explores pop culture and humor. You can see how she made the original fish bag, as well as a pair of pigeon shoes.

Three varieties of Otsuhata’s fish bags—kinme, saury, and sea bream—are available in The Colossal Shop.

 

 

 

 

 

A Colossal

Highlight

Cluster Earrings