Design

Section



Art Design

Fabric Tree Stumps Formed From Pieces of Discarded Clothing by Tamara Kostianovsky

June 4, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All photos © Roni Mocan unless otherwise noted

Textile artist Tamara Kostianovsky creates realistic elements from nature out of strips of fabric and discarded clothing. In her latest series, the artist forms severed tree stumps from pieces of her late father’s clothing, integrating his belongings into a landscape of layered, multi-colored logs. The works address the passing of time and allude to the body returning to the environment after death.

The project is inspired by the South American people of the Andes who believe that Mother Earth is embodied by the surrounding mountains. Kostianovsky translates this idea to placing clothing items into sculptures that represent the earth and its environment. She explains in an artist statement: “Fusing the shapes of severed tree stumps of different forms and sizes to a palette indicative of the insides of the body, [the series Tree Stumps] pays homage to the cultural heritage of the people of Latin America, while presenting an alternative way of thinking about our post-industrial relationship to nature.”

Kostianovsky became entranced with the body while working at a surgeon’s office during her adolescence. She continues to make work that examines muscle and bone, often in other species such as livestock or whales. You can take a look inside the artist’s studio by visiting her Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

Photo courtesy of Wave Hill

 

 



Art Design

Sculptural Chalk Drawers by Nikolas Bentel Create Dots, Circles, and Lines on Chalkboards and Sidewalks

May 31, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Designer Nikolas Bentel reimagined the classic slim cylinder of chalk that’s traditionally used for classroom education and sidewalk decoration to create a unique series of Chalk Drawers. Each one features a different geometrically precise pattern that together create the three fundamental building blocks of drawing: lines, circles, and dots.

Bentel used 3D printing and a quinary number system, which allows the Drawers to be used as an accurate drawing instrument for any metric system. The line design can also cross over to to the world of music, to create staff lines. You can find all three Drawers in The Colossal Shop, and you can see more from Bentel on Instagram.

 

 



Design

Contemporary Takes on Cuckoo Clocks by Guido Zimmerman Resemble Brutalist Block Buildings

May 29, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

German multidisciplinary artist Guido Zimmermann reinterprets the iconic German cuckoo clock using examples of modern architecture. The artist notes that while “the classic cuckoo clock stands for the prosperity of the middle class and counts as a kind of luxury for the staid home, the updated version as a panel construction shows today’s urban and social life in apartment blocks.”

Zimmermann drew on specific examples of modern architecture to create his sculptural “Cuckoo Blocks,” including the Glenkerry House by Brutalist architect Ernő Goldfinger and Bauhaus architect Marcel Breuer’s Flaine hotel. Grids of windows peek out of flat concrete surfaces, with contemporary details such as satellite dishes and cactus houseplants.

The artist studied at the Academy of Visual Arts in his native city of Frankfurt, where he currently lives and works. You can see more of Zimmermann’s diverse projects, including paintings and murals, on his website, as well as on Instagram and Facebook.

 

 



Animation Design

A Colorful Medley of Inventive Type Animations Puts the Alphabet in Motion

May 24, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Each year the project 36 Days of Type invites graphic designers, illustrators, typographers, and artists from around the world to submit their own alphabet-based designs during a 36-day typographical marathon. Designer Ben Huynh submitted animated letters for each day of the open call which he combined into a short film. The video presents his three-dimensional type in the form of Mephis-style office supplies, modern furniture, and abstract neon light installations, all set to the song “Sunshine” by Gym and Swim.

Submissions for this years 36 Days of Type ended earlier this month. You can see all of the alphabetical selections from this year’s edition on the project’s Instagram, and view previous iterations of Huynh’s alphabet animations on his own Instagram and Vimeo. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

 

 



Art Design

Interior Bas-Relief Sculptures of Peacocks and Lush Florals by Goga Tandashvili

May 24, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Russian artist Goga Tandashvili carves large-scale bas-relief works in interior spaces, adding details such as florals, tropical leaves, and perched peacocks to otherwise flat surfaces. The three-dimensional murals project from the wall with a life-like accuracy, with each bloom and sprout of plumage having the same shape and size as the object it imitates. Tandashvili uses a combination of hand building and carving techniques to create the nature-based sculptures, which act as fluid extensions of the wall itself. (via My Modern Met)

 

 

 



Design

A Plush Rug Recreates the Grids and Greenways of Manhattan in Colorful Wool

May 22, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

To make it a bit less exhausting to walk across New York City, South African furniture designer Ollie de Wit has recreated the island of Manhattan in a plush, colorful rug. Different pile heights are incorporated to create a sense of dimension, differentiating low-pile streets and waterways from medium-pile housing blocks and tall-pile treetops. The 2 x 3 m (approximately 6.5 x 10 feet) wool rugs are limited to an edition of 25 and are available in Shift Perspective’s online store. You can see more of the studio’s projects and design inspiration on Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Design

Uplift: An Endlessly Rotating Stair Sculpture Powered by the Sun

May 21, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Uplift is a architecturally-minded desk sculpture that slowly rotates using the power of the sun. The walnut work hovers inside a glass bell jar, powered by a steel and brass mechanism that allows the staircase endlessly rotate. The mesmerizing design was invented by friends Tom Lawton and Ben Jandrell, seasoned inventors who spent the last two years optimizing the technology behind the spinning object.

The first generation of Uplift sculptures are currently produced by the pair in Lawton’s home town of Malmesbury, UK, and are being funded through Kickstarter. You can see more of Lawton’s inventions, like this motion-activated running light he co-invented with Jandrell, on his website.

 

 

A Colossal

Highlight

Advanced Yoga Joes