Category: Design

A Picture Frame Powered by Strobe Lights Turns Everyday Objects into Slow Motion Sculptures 

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For over 15 years, scientist and artist Jeff Lieberman has been fascinated by how objects move in slow motion since first mastering high-speed photography at MIT. His experiments eventually landed him a hosting gig at Discovery’s Time Warp where he uses high speed cameras to explore a variety of everyday occurrences in slow motion. Two years ago Lieberman began to wonder if there might be a way to bring the optical illusion of slow motion imagery into the real world. What if you could see a slow motion object up close and practically reach out and touch it? The result is Slow Dance, a tiny environment that appears to slow down time.

Slow Dance is a picture frame that makes use of strobe lights to turn any object you place inside of it appear to move in slow motion. Lieberman shares:

Strobe lights are nothing new. From the photos of Eadweard Muybridge to the photos of Doc Edgerton, extremely fast strobe lights have been helping us to see into fast motions. On a dancefloor, strobe lights turn us into stop motion animations. But we’ve put strobe light to use in a different fashion.

By using high speed strobe lights blinking 80 times a second, your eyes cannot even see that they are blinking — the light looks continuous. By synchronizing the strobes to the high-speed vibration of objects (feathers, branches, flowers, etc), we create the visual illusion of those objects moving in slow motion. This is a phenomenon called persistence of vision, and works similarly to the way a TV works — by flickering frozen images quickly enough that we perceive them as continuous motion.

Slow Dance just went up on Kickstarter and appears to have funded almost instantly. You can see more photos and videos about how it works here.

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New European Mosaic Floors Captured by Photographer Sebastian Erras 

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All images via @parisianfloors

German photographer Sebastian Erras (previously) made his mosaic-focused Instagram @parisianfloors famous by capturing the detailed floors beneath the feet of Parisians, one perspective shots that featured his feet transposed against colorful tiles. Now Erras does not limit himself to capturing only Paris’s tiles, and has been capturing some beautiful patterns found in the buildings of London. The above shot from London’s Royal College of Art is one of our personal favorites.

You can see more of Erras’s photography projects on his portfolio site. (via Culture N Lifestyle)

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Nature-Based Animations Projected on São Miguel Island by VJ Suave 

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Artists Ygor Marotta and Ceci Soloaga of VJ Suave (previously) were recently invited to participate in the Walk&Talk art residency on São Miguel Island, Azores, Portugal. The duo transformed their projected street art animations to happily dance across the trees, cliffs, and shores of the the island including the Lagoa das Empadadas, Porto da Ribeirinha, Cachoeira do Cabrito and Lagoa das Sete Cidades. Using long exposure, VJ Suave captured their interventions with nature, creating the videos and GIFs seen here.

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Off the Grid: A Couple Spends 24 Years Building a Floating Island Home in Canada 

Twenty-five years ago artists Catherine King and Wayne Adams made the realization they would never have enough income to afford real estate so they made a fairly radical decision: they would build an island. Currently moored off the coast of Vancouver Island about 45 minutes by boat to the nearest town, their sprawling floating house is called called “Freedom Cove.”

The completely mobile island is made of 12 tethered sections that incorporates four greenhouses, living quarters, a kitchen, workshop, art gallery, a lighthouse and even a dance floor. Adams estimates the structure weighs in around 500 tons (a million pounds) and says everything was constructed with a handsaw and hammer without the aid of power tools. In this short clip Great Big Story takes a brief glimpse inside this supremely unusual residence.

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Handmade Floor Rugs in the Shape of Your Favorite Foods by SurfaceWerks 

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Wisconsin-based artist and educator Carly Dellger started her Etsy shop SurfaceWerks in 2012, a store dedicated to her crochet rugs in the shape of avocados, cacti, and sunny-side up eggs. Each of Dellger’s rugs is an original design and created without a pattern to ensure that each piece is completely unique. You can pick from one of these handmade designs, or request a custom rug on SurfaceWerks’ site. More of her rugs—as well as doodles and puppy pics—can be seen on her Instagram. (via So Super Awesome)

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Outfits Sourced From German Public Transportation Fabric by Menja Stevenson 

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“Bustour S (Stuttgart public bus)” (2006), all images © Menja Stevenson

Like most that read this article, German artist Menja Stevenson has had her fair share of rides in city buses and trains, each of which has forced her (and you) to sit on top of garishly designed uniform seating. The fabric, as investigated by this article on the BBC, is not only made to outlast spills and stains, but also trends, as many of the painfully drab designs can last a decade or more.

Interested in this accident-resistant material, Stevenson began sourcing and creating outfits out of the fabric in 2006 for her project Bustour. The project forced her to persuade German transportation companies to personally ship her the fabric, as they are not commercially available. After finally obtaining the material she designed clothes that aesthetically camouflaged herself within each bus or train interior matching the fabric, capturing the reaction of fellow passengers.

“Wearing them, you sweat like crazy, they feel like a knight’s armor and it’s hard to act naturally,” said Stevenson. “I couldn’t believe that many people didn’t realize the connection seeing me and the seats together. Did they think that it was sheer coincidence? Some curious people at least talked to me, and a very few laughed, but most passengers would look shyly at me and quickly look the other way again.”

You can see archived documentation of these reactions (or lack there of) on Stevenson’s website. If you’re searching for a slightly more practical use for old transportation fabric take a look at the bags and accessories made from airplane seat fabric by Fallen Furniture (previously). (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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“Bustour M (Münster public bus)” (2015)

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“Public Pattern / Bustouren” (2006)

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“Bustour S (Stuttgart Metro)” (2008)

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“Bustour B (Bielefeld public bus)” (2015)

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“Bustour RW (Rottweil public bus)” (2010)

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