Category: Design

The Grandeur of German Pipe Organs Photographed by Robert Götzfried 

Long fascinated by the design of pipe organs, photographer Robert Götzfried was recently permitted into 20 Catholic churches in southern Germany where he was able to create portraits of these mammoth instruments. When viewed singularly the pipe organ is impressive enough, but collectively the photos tell the story of an ancient instrument that varies so strikingly in design and layout that it’s hard to believe these are somehow the same musical device.

In his photographic practice Götzfried often approaches a variety of similar objects or locales both grand and obscure from Cambodian barber shops to bowling alleys or abandoned gas stations. Through each collection he quickly highlights the similarities or differences that bind a culture or lifestyle together. You can explore more of his photography on Facebook. (via Fubiz)

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Miniature Retro Papercraft Synthesizers by Dan McPharlin 

Produced between 2006 and 2009, Australian designer and illustrator Dan McPharlin's Analogue Miniatures are a marvel of papercraft. The tiny analogue synthesizers and pieces of recording equipment were pieced together with paper, framing mat board, string, rubber bands and cardboard, and appeared in everything from art shows to editorial spreads in magazines like Esquire. McPharlin is widely known for his retro sci-fi illustration work that appears on album covers and in limited edition prints, and he brings this aspect of fiction to these paper models as well. None of the objects are meant as exact replicas or recreations of real-life devices, but are instead speculative objects that draw aesthetic attributes from the audio technology of the 70s and 80s.

You can see many more pieces from Analogue Miniatures on Flickr. (via Strictly Paper)

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Hand Drawn Architectural Sketches by Adelina Gareeva 

Architecture student Adelina Gareeva drafts her work by hand, creating extremely detailed architectural portraits by putting pencil to paper rather than stylus to tablet. Gareeva has created an Instagram account for her laborious sketches, publishing drawings she’s completed of the Panthéon in Paris, Saints Peter and Paul Cathedral in Kazan, the multi-spired Saint Basil’s Cathedral in Moscow, and more.

In addition to her lengthy drawings of famous landmarks and imaginative concepts, she also shares quick sketches that she creates while traveling. These come straight from the Kazan-based architect’s sketchbook, and are often much more gestural presentations of the historic buildings she observes.

Gareeva is currently studying at the Kazan State University of Architecture and Engineering. You can see more of her technical drawings and sketchbook musings on her Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

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3D-Printed Solar Systems, Moons and Planets for Your Desktop 

The folks over at London-based Little Planet Factory make tiny 3d-printed planets and moons you can sit on your desktop or hold in your hands. Designs include everything from entire solar systems to collections of moons, individual planets, and even science fiction creations like a theoretical terraformed Mars globe. See more in their shop! (via So Super Awesome)

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Architect Ricardo Bofill’s Abandoned Cement Factory Residence and Studio 

In 1973 Spanish architect Ricardo Bofill stumbled upon a cement factory in Catalonia, Spain, an enormous compound of silos and buildings that covered nearly two and a half miles of underground tunnels. Bofill decided to buy The World War I era structure and its grounds, making modifications to the original structure in order to create an all-inclusive live/work space that would unite the Surrealist, Abstract, and Brutalist elements found in its industrial form.

Original construction to transform the sprawling series of buildings took a little over a year and a half. After the dust cleared from the jack hammers and dynamite, Catalan craftsmen worked to add gardens and purpose back into the abandoned compound. Today the factory holds a cathedral, model workshop, archive rooms, residence, and studio, a workspace for Bofill’s firm spread over four floors in the factory’s silos and connected by a spiral staircase.

Despite over forty years in the making, the entire project is constantly evolving and is one that Bofill never sees as being fully completed. With continuous tweaks, Bofill has created a perfectly programmed existence, a ritualized lifestyle that goes against his previously nomadic early life.

“I have the impression of living in a precinct, in a closed universe which protects me from the outside and everyday life,” said Bofill on his website. “The Cement Factory is a place of work par excellence. Life goes on here in a continuous sequence, with very little difference between work and leisure.”

You can see more images of the garden-covered structures on Bofill’s website, and see a short Nowness documentary on his studio and residence below. (via Designboom)

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New Geometric Paper Cats and Other Creatures by Estudio Guardabosques 

Estudio Guardabosques (previously) is a Buenos Aires-based design and illustration studio consisting of Carolina Silvero and Juan Nicolás Elizalde. The duo create a wide range of paper objects for editorial, artistic, and personal experimentation, each infused with geometric flair and a cheeky sense of humor. Seen here are a number of projects from the last year or so including an installation titled Gatos Furiosos featuring a group of ambivalent felines as they destroy an entire city that was built for the Furious Drawing Festival.

You can see more of Estudio Guardabosques’ work on Instagram and Behance.

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