Category: Design

Ethereal Sculptures and Wearable Orbs Formed From Synthetic Fabric by Mariko Kusumoto 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All images provided by Mariko Kusumoto

Japanese artist Mariko Kusumoto uses translucent fabric to produce balloon-like objects, orbs that contain various forms trapped within their soft exterior. The creations inside range from smaller versions of the spherical sculptures to sea creatures and cars, playful forms that fit the bright colors Kusumoto chooses for her works. To set the polyester fabric into the shapes she desires she heats the pieces to the right temperature, allowing the material to memorize the shape she wishes to create. These works are then formed into sculptural or wearable objects, 3D jewelry that can be worn around the neck.

“My work reflects various, observable phenomena that stimulate my mind and senses; they can be natural or man-made,” said Kusumoto in her artist statement. ” I ‘reorganize’ them into a new presentation that can be described as surreal, amusing, graceful, or unexpected.”

The Massachusetts-based artist’s work is in the permanent collections of the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, The Kock Collection at the Swiss National Museum, Racine Art Museum, and Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens and is represented by Mobilia Gallery in Cambridge, MA. You can see more of her sculptural and wearable works on her Facebook.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

MarikoKusumoto_012

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

MarikoKusumoto_11

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

Minimalistic One Line Tattoos By Mo Gangi 

MoGanji_03

All images via Mo Ganji

Berlin-based Mo Ganji produces tattoos that utilize a single line, black images with little more detail than a couple of dots to offset his swirling strokes. The images are all figural, yet range from elephants and koi fish to more gestural images of half-drawn faces. Each work is breathtaking in its simplicity, stark images that relate to the artist’s own views of mastering a simple and honest life. To check out more of Ganji’s work, head over to his Instagram. (via Coudal)

MoGanji_01

MoGangi_09

MoGanji_07

MoGanji_04

MoGanji_05

MoGanji_02

MoGanji_08  MoGanji_06

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Ingenious Rube Goldberg Machines Built from Magnets and Marbles 

YouTube user Kaplamino has a channel where he shares inventive chain reactions or tricks using Kapla blocks and found objects. His latest video involves a series of Rube Goldberg machines that rely on marbles, magnets, and a bit of gravity to create some astounding little sequences. I can’t even imagine how he came up with some of these. (via Reddit)

rube-1

rube-2

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Japanese Lego Master Builds Delicious-Looking Creations From Blocks 

lego-1

I don’t think I’ve ever felt so hungry looking at Lego blocks! A Japanese Lego creator who goes by the nickname Tary has sculpted one of the most delicious-looking collections of food made entirely from Lego blocks. From fruit and vegetables to bento boxes, junk food and even desserts, Tary has almost all major food groups covered!

lego-2

lego-3

Of course Tary doesn’t only create food. He sculpts Gundam robots and Star Wars characters, each more impressive than the last. But it’s really his food creations that have won him the most recognition. Like that pizza slice! Who could have thought dripping cheese could be so realistically portrayed with hard blocks?

One of Tary’s most recent creations was the Tendon tempura rice bowl. Using a combination of white blocks for the rice and yellow and orange blocks for the deep-fried shrimp tempura, he created a magnificent-looking meal that won 1st place in an original Lego model contest. The entries are on display through May 31, 2016 at ClickBrick Lego store in Odaiba, Tokyo (located within the Venus Fort shopping complex – Gmap) if you’d like to visit. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

lego-4

lego-5

lego-6

lego-7

lego-8

See related posts on Colossal about , .

A Sculptural Geometric Pop-Up Book By Tauba Auerbach 

Tauba Auerbach (previously) partnered with Printed Matter to publish the project [2,3], a large-scale book that exists between a children’s pop-up and sculptural object. The project folds neatly into its own custom sleeve, and contains six separate paper sculptures that spring to life when opened. Director Sam Fleischner filmed the project’s unboxing, catching the sweetly satisfying sounds of the books creaking to open, and the objects inside slowing falling into place. You can see more of Auerbach’s designs on Instagram. (via Juxtapoz)

tauba-1

TaubaA_05.jpg

tauba-3

TaubaA_03.jpg

tauba-2

TaubaA_01.jpg

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

A Wood Turned Bamboo Death Star by Frank Howarth 

In this new timelapse video, woodworker Frank Howarth (previously) demonstrates how he designed and constructed a replica of the Star Wars’ Death Star out of bamboo. The Portland-based designer, who also has a degree in architecture from Harvard, shares much of his behind-the-scenes processes through his wildly popular YouTube channel. I expected to skip through different parts of the video, but Howarth has an uncanny ability to film himself working, it really is worth watching the whole thing straight through. Even the sound design is great.

death-1

death-2

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , , .

Page 2 of 1911234...»