Category: Design

LEGO Designs a Vintage 1960’s Volkswagen Beetle Fully Prepped For a Day at the Beach 

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All images ©2016 LEGO Group

LEGO designers have developed a new flashback kit, an advanced model that replicates many of the iconic elements of a vintage 1960 Volkswagon Beetle. Built using 1,167 pieces, the bright blue replica has several operational features, including a pop-up hood and truck, flip-down seats, and a removable roof to peep the steering wheel and other accessories found inside.

Designers made sure not to leave out any detail, including a model of the original 4-cylinder air-cooled engine, fuel tank, rounded mudguards, interchangeable license plates, and tiny window decals. On the roof of the vehicle, LEGO also added a rack that fits a tiny surfboard and cooler containing ice and bottled drinks. In total, the new kit is 15 centimeters high, 29 centimeters long, and 12 centimeters wide. You can learn more about the details of the kit in the video below before it becomes available to the public on July 17. (via Designboom)

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A Glass Coffee Table Propelled by a Team of Rockets 

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Cypriot-based designer Stelios Mousarris conceived of this fun glass tabletop that blasts into the air aboard five wooden rockets. The designer was inspired by the nostalgia of his own childhood toy collection and he tried to embody the “retro” look with cartoon-like puffs of clouds at the base of each rocket. The table combines a variety of techniques from 3D printing to lathe work, and each rocket position is customizable. The piece is currently available for pre-order through his website. (via NOTCOT)

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This 24-Hour Clock Gradually Transitions You From Dusk to Dawn 

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All images via Scott Thrift

Instead of being a slave to the numbers on your clock, designer Scott Thrift would like you to have a more peaceful relationship to your timepiece, one that revolves around gradients and soothing colors rather than numerals. Today, his newest design, is a 24-hour timepiece that moves at half the speed of a typical clock, and operates on times of the day rather than numeric classifications. The subtle blues and purples that make up the clock’s gradient break down the day into dawn, noon, dusk, and midnight, allowing for a gradual transition rather than one that evokes stress by watching numbers tick by.

You can preorder Today on Thrift’s Kickstarter, or visit his previous clock design The Present on his website. (via My Modern Met)

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Broken Ceramics Found on the Beach, Turned Into Chopstick Rests Using Kintsugi 

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“As every Japanese has realized, the waves can take away a great deal from us,” says artist Tomomi Kamoshita. But it is also true that we greatly benefit from it.” Using broken pieces of ceramics that she picked up on the shore, and combining it with pieces of her own broken ceramics, the Tokyo-based potter uses the ancient kintsugi method of repairing ceramics to turn the shards into one-of-a-kind chopstick rests.

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If the broken pieces of ceramics could talk, some would tell you that they fell off a ship. Others would tell you they were swept away by a tsunami. Some might even simply have been thrown away. But rather than focus on their tragic state of being, and how they got that way, Kamoshita looks to the future; the revival. “I wanted to revive what wave have brought us,” she says. In fact, many of the shards have been polished by the waves and sand while all the while retaining their beautiful colors.

As a potter, Kamoshita was skilled in the ancient craft of kintsugi: “a Japanese traditional repairing technique used to connect broken pieces together with gold.” Using this method – intended to accentuate the cracks rather than hide them – the artist pieces together the broken ceramics she’s collected. The pink pieces, she explains, are her own broken ceramics, which she likens to the cherry blossoms that come back to life every Spring.

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Kamoshita received honorable mention in the 2016 Ronin | Globus Artist-in-Residence Program, for which Spoon & Tamago [Colossal’s sister site] was a judge. The ceramic pieces will be on display in the group exhibition “Contemporary Talents of Japan” from June 23 to July 30, 2016 at the Ronin Gallery in New York. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

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Reinvigorating Wroclaw’s Riverside With Site-Specific Chair Installations 

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All images via No Studio

Collaborative duo No Studio, comprised of Polish artists Magda Szwajcowska and Michal Majewski, have placed several architectural interventions in their native city of Wrocław in an attempt to repopulate an area that has become forgotten about and neglected. The project fits site-specific chairs onto concrete stairs that lead to the city’s river, bright blue furniture that also acts as loveseat sunbeds for passersby. The pieces are installed as a part of the DOFA 2016 Lowersilesian Festival of Architecture, which is comprised of works around this year’s slogan of “Spaces for Beauty.”

You can view more of No Studio’s miniature architectural works on their website. (via Designboom)

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Discarded Fishing Nets and Other Ocean Trash Repurposed Into Running Shoes 

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Image via Adidas

Stitched with thread produced from discarded fishing nets, Adidas‘ newest shoes are a collaboration with the ocean activist collective and company Parley for the Oceans. The idea for the shoe was hatched last year, but was more of a idealistic prototype than a ready-to-wear option for the masses. Today however, Adidas is releasing fifty pairs of the sneaker, a shoe composed of more than 16 old plastic bottles and 13 grams of gill nets.

This limited number of pairs is due to the difficult task of taking the collected trash and spinning it into fiber suitable for high performance shoes. Plastic bottles are relatively easy to transform into a useable material, but when it comes to the gill nets (which emit the smell of rotting fish) the task is a bit more difficult. Not only is the smell difficult to scrub from the nets, but the nylon is extra tough and requires being ground into a powder before it can be reformed into a material fit for the Adidas sneaker.

To collect these environmentally damaging materials, Parley partners with small countries that have large ties to marine pollution—locations like the Maldives, Grenada, and Jamaica. After partnering, Parley team members help clean up fisheries and other oceanside spots while teaching locals alternatives to using plastic in their businesses. The materials collected by Parley are then distributed not only to Adidas, but also institutions such as Parsons School of Design, which might help change the way new generations of designers think about incorporating these materials into future designs.

An announcement will be made soon on how to win one of the 50 released pairs of the collaborative shoe on Adidas’ Instagram.

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photo credit: Giacomo Giorigi / Sea Shepherd Global

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