Category: Design

A Countryside Sliding Glass House Designed by dRMM 

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Photos © Alex de Rijke / GIF by Gasoline Station

Appearing as an oversized red barn, architecture and design studio dRMM‘s Sliding House has a much more complex facade than its doppleganger’s A-frame design. The project encompasses three separate buildings (house, garage, and guest annex), and was built with the intention for the owners to grow food, entertain, and enjoy the landscape from the structure. Each segment of the Suffolk, England property is connected by a 20 ton, motor-driven enclosure which slides up and down the buildings to create constantly changing coverage for the home, and exposes open-air living areas.

An escape from static architecture, the house gives its inhabitants endless options for living comfortably and freely during each season. There is even the option to extend the roofing system beyond its current length to cover a swimming pool if the owners want to add one down the line.

The innovative residential project was completed in 2009, and was the 2009 winner of the Royal Institute of British Architects East Award, and winner of “Best New-Build” and “Home of the Year” at the 2009 Grand Designs Awards. (via The Gasoline Station, Design Milk)

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Photos © Alex de Rijke / GIF by Gasoline Station

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Photos © Alex de Rijke / GIF by Gasoline Station

© Ross Russell and Sally Morris, www.therussellhouse.org
Photo © Alex de Rijke

© Ross Russell and Sally Morris, www.therussellhouse.org
Photo © Alex de Rijke

© Ross Russell and Sally Morris, www.therussellhouse.org
Photo © Alex de Rijke

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Hungarian Banknote Concept Designed by Barbara Bernát 

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For her MA degree project at the University of West Hungary, Budapest-based graphic designer Barbara Bernát devised this lovely concept for the Hungarian euro. The project involved five denominations of increasing scale, each made with a set of copperplate etchings; animals of increasing size on the front and related plants on the back. The kicker is a security feature that reveals the skeleton of each animal under UV light, not unlike the new Canadian passport. Regardless of whether this would translate well into actual currency, this is phenomenal way to get hired. Design students take note. (via Kottke)

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Honey on Tap: A New Beehive that Automatically Extracts Honey without Disturbing Bees 

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The Flow Hive is a new beehive invention that promises to eliminate the more laborious aspects of collecting honey from a beehive with a novel spigot system that taps into specially designed honeycomb frames. Invented over the last decade by father and son beekeepers Stuart and Cedar Anderson, the system eliminates the traditional process of honey extraction where frames are removed from beehives, opened with hot knives, and loaded into a machine that uses centrifugal force to get the honey out. Here is how the Andersons explain their design:

The Flow frame consists of already partly formed honeycomb cells. The bees complete the comb with their wax, fill the cells with honey and cap the cells as usual. When you turn the tool, a bit like a tap, the cells split vertically inside the comb forming channels allowing the honey to flow down to a sealed trough at the base of the frame and out of the hive while the bees are practically undisturbed on the comb surface.

When the honey has finished draining you turn the tap again in the upper slot resets the comb into the original position and allows the bees to chew the wax capping away, and fill it with honey again.

It’s difficult to say how this might scale up for commercial operations, but for urban or backyard beekeeping it seems like a whole lot of fun. It wouldn’t be hard to imagine these on the roof of a restaurant where honey could be extracted daily, or for use by kids or others who might be more squeamish around live bees. You can see more on their website and over on Facebook.

Update: The Flow Hive is currently seeking funding on IndieGogo. So far they’ve raised $1.8 million in 16 hours.

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Architectural Letterforms Come to Life for ‘Deepblue Networks’ 

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For a recent promotional campaign, German creative firm Deepblue Networks collaborated with illustrator and graphic designer Florian Schommer of Kjosk Collective to create a series of animated buildings using the letters of their logo. The 8 illustrations turn each letter of the logo into a multi-story building and imagines the staff working inside. You can see the full presentation here. Creative direction by Burkhard Müller. (via Behance)

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Graffiti Artist ‘Faust’ Draws Calligraphic Messages on Snow-Covered Cars in New York City 

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For the last few years NYC-based graffiti artist Faust has been putting everyone’s handwriting to shame with these impromptu notes drawn on snow-covered vehicles around the city. Faust is known worldwide for his fusion of classical calligraphy with contemporary graffiti in murals and other art projects. You can follow him on Instagram and see several more snow pieces spanning the last few years on Behance. (via Laughing Squid, Design TAXI)

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A New Artificial Skylight System Nearly Indistinguishable from the Sun Itself 

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In what may be one of the most ground-breaking developments in creating artificial sunlight, a group of Italian scientists recently announced CoeLux, a new kind of skylight that perfectly mimics the feel of daylight. The creator’s claim the system is so effective that it tricks unknowing individuals into thinking they are looking up at the actual sun.

The inventors are somewhat tight-lipped about how CoeLux works, but it involves filtering a light source through a layer of nanoparticles that mimic Earth’s atmosphere. Because of this, not only does the color match sunshine but the quality does as well. In the photos above—which CoeLux insists aren’t digitally altered—you can get an idea of how realistic the light is, and see it in action in the video.

The light is currently available in three different configurations that mimic sunlight at different points on the globe including tropical, mediterranean, and nordic environments. Applications for CoeLux might involve anywhere light is scarce, from extreme environments like scientific outposts to underground parking garages or even in hospitals. You can see more on their website. (via PetaPixel)

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