Category: Design

New One-of-a-Kind Landscape Rugs by Alexandra Kehayoglou 

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Argentinean artist Alexandra Kehayoglou (previously) produces handmade wool rugs that appear like aerial snapshots of dreamy pastoral landscapes. Mimicking lush environments filled with trees and moss, her hand-tufted works can take up to several months to complete depending on size. One of her most recent pieces is a carpeted runway for designer Dries Van Noten made in collaboration with artist Danish artist Olafur Eliasson. Another piece, titled No Longer Creek and curated by Artsy, was included at this year’s Design Miami/ Basel from June 14-20.

You can take a look at more of Kehayoglou’s tufted wool landscapes on Instagram, Artsy, and on her website.

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New Scenes of Fantasy and Disaster on Traditional Blue Porcelain Dinner Plates by Calamityware 

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Look once you see your grandmother’s china, look twice and you see… Big Foot? Don Moyer, the graphic designer behind Calamityware (previously here and here), has designed several more white porcelain plates playfully poking the traditional blue Willow pattern design. On his plates, intricate patterns found on the outer edge trick the eye until one notices mysterious occurrences happening near the center. Pirate ships take over Victorian villages, swamp monsters grab for traditional Japanese pagodas, and erupting volcanoes threaten to overtake peaceful towns.

Two of Moyer’s newest plate designs, a group of savage zombie poodles and a soaring pterodactyl, are currently on Kickstarter. You can purchase these plates on Calamityware’s website, where you will also find some dishware crawling with ants and flies.

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Masterfully Designed LEGO Animals by Felix Jaensch 

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German artist Felix Jaensch has an uncanny ability to translate the ruffle of parrot feathers or the lumpy fur of orangutans into lifelike LEGO sculptures. He shares many of his original designs on Flickr and a few pieces including the red fox are available is DIY kits through MOC Nation. He’s also trying to get support on LEGO Ideas for his guinea pig design. (via Matt’s Brick Gallery)

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A Fascinating Film About the Last Day of Hot Metal Typesetting at the New York Times 

On July 2, 1978 the New York Times made a significant technological leap when they scuttled the last of 60 manually-operated linotype machines to usher in the era of digital and photographic typesetting. When working at 100% efficiency with an experienced operator the Linotype machines could produce 14 lines per minute cast on the spot from hot lead. That number would increase to 1,000 lines per minute the very next day using an array of computers and digital storage.

Typesetter Carl Schlesinger and filmmaker David Loeb Weiss documented the last day of hot metal typesetting in a film called Farewell — ETAOIN SHRDLU (the obscure title is poignantly explained in the film). This amazing behind-the-scenes view not only captures the laborious effort to create a single page of printed type, but also the the emotions and thoughts of several New York Times employees as they candidly discuss their feelings about transitioning to a new technology. One man decides he’s not ready for the digital age and plans to retire on the spot after 49 years, while others seem to transition smoothly into the new methods of production.

This historically significant documentary was digitized in 2015 and made available online in HD from Linotype: The Film, another documentary about linotype printing that includes portions of Farewell. While I’ve always been somewhat familiar with the history of typesetting and printing, I didn’t fully grasp the absurd mechanical complexity and scale required to print a newspaper before the digital age. Each newspaper page was cast in a 40 lb. block of lead!? A huge number of employees were deaf!? If you’re a graphic design or typography professor, here’s a great way to spend 30 minutes.

If you’re super interested, the New York Times TimesMachine has a complete high resolution scan of the final hot metal typeset newspaper made in the film. (via Reddit)

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Paint Splotch Embroidery by Olya Glagoleva and Lisa Smirnova 

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While working in the studio, paint is bound to drip, splatter, and brush up against an artist’s clothes, transforming a studio uniform into a chaotic collection of attractive mishaps. Designer Olya Glagoleva in collaboration with Russian artist Lisa Smirnova (previously) captured this look with an elegantly designed twist. All of the clothing included in their collection is embroidered in the style of Smirnova, with the markings of accidental paint drips and doodles adorning each of the jumpsuits, dresses, and smock-like blouses. The pieces are all one-of-a-kind, transforming the clothing into unique artworks that have taken nearly 100 hours to make. You can see more of Glagoleva’s designs with her line GO on her Instagram @go_with_olya, and more of Smirnova’s embroidery and illustrations on her own @lisa_smirnova. See more from this collection on Behance.

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A Miniature T-Shirt Screen Printing Rig Designed by Devin Smith 

While working for a t-shirt factory back in 2013, miniature artist Devin Smith was inspired to build a tiny replica of their studio, a project that would end up consuming 5 months of his free time but resulted in a fun gift for his employers that’s now displayed in their front showroom. Eventually Devin took the minuscule clothing idea even further by designing a fully functional miniature screen printing rig that transfers designs onto tiny clothes—Barbie doll scale, specifically. Here’s a video of it in action, and you can see more of his miniature designs on Facebook. (via The Daily Miniature)

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