Category: Design

New Geometric Paper Cats and Other Creatures by Estudio Guardabosques 

Estudio Guardabosques (previously) is a Buenos Aires-based design and illustration studio consisting of Carolina Silvero and Juan Nicolás Elizalde. The duo create a wide range of paper objects for editorial, artistic, and personal experimentation, each infused with geometric flair and a cheeky sense of humor. Seen here are a number of projects from the last year or so including an installation titled Gatos Furiosos featuring a group of ambivalent felines as they destroy an entire city that was built for the Furious Drawing Festival.

You can see more of Estudio Guardabosques’ work on Instagram and Behance.

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The Rise of the Image: Every NY Times Front Page Since 1852 in Under a Minute 

The New York Times published its first issue on September 18, 1851, but the first photos wouldn’t appear on the cover until the early 1900s over 60 years later. This visual timeline by self-described data artist Josh Begley captures the storied newspaper’s approach to layout and photography by incorporating every NY Times front page ever published into a single one-minute video. The timelapse captures decades text-only front pages before the newspaper began to incorporate illustrated maps and wood engravings. The liberal usage of black and white photography begins a century later and finally the first color photo appears in 1997. What a fascinating way to view history through image, over 60,000 front pages in all. If you liked this, don’t miss Farewell — ETAOIN SHRDLU. (via Kottke)

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A Homemade Multipoint Pinhole Camera Made from 32,000 Drinking Straws 

Using 32,000 black drinking straws, collaborators Michael (Mick) Farrell and Cliff Haynes created the Straw Camera, a homemade camera they began experimenting with in 2007. Despite the connection one might draw to a pinhole camera, the Straw Camera actually functions quite differently, producing a multipoint perspective from an array rather than a single point perspective.

The direct analogue process records the light collected from each straw onto a piece of paper secured to the back of the camera. The camera gives a direct 1:1 view of the subject that is placed before it, however it translates the image to one that mirrors that of pointillist painting, breaking the subject into thousands of little dots.

“In a world beset by selfies with their immediate gratification, and HD television in all its glory feeding our visual appetite, a Straw Camera image of an individual, with its engineering projection and disappearance of the subject into the near fog of visual capture, gives the viewer a glimpse of just how transitory perception is,” said Cliff about the camera.

To read more about the project, check out the photography duo’s website for the Straw Camera, or their book which was published earlier this month. (via PetaPixel)

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Unique Stool Design Utilizes Offcut Wood Combined With Resin to Eliminate Construction Waste 

Seeking a way to reduce waste as part of their industrial design practice, South Korean design studio HATTERN conceived of a hybrid resin and wood seating concept called Zero Per Stool. As part of the construction process the waste offcut from creating the legs are saved and then combined with resin to form the stool’s seat. The resulting objects have almost zero waste and appear visually unique from piece to piece—each stool subtly paying tribute to its own construction process. HATTERN also adopted the same process for a series of resin coasters that make use of scrap wood materials. You can follow more of their recent work on Facebook. (via Design Milk)

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Arabic Words Illustrated to Match Their Literal Meaning by Mahmoud Tammam 

“Cat”, “Duck”, “Dog”, “Fox”.

Egypt-based graphic designer Mahmoud Tammam creates simple modifications of Arabic words, transforming the language into visual representations of their meaning. The words Tammam chooses to design are often animals, turning long slopes into a llama’s neck, or a series of curves into an octopus’s tentacles. By creating these pictorial translations he allows the words to be understood by those not familiar or well-versed with the Arabic language, a minimal gesture that leads to a much greater understanding.

You can see more examples of Tammam’s illustrated language on his Instagram and Behance. (via My Modern Met)

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Delicate Sketches of the Original Peace Symbol to be Exhibited in London 

Sketch of nuclear disarmament symbol, by Gerald Holtom. © Commonweal Collection.

Stretching back over a half century, one of the most iconic symbols adopted by the international community has been the peace symbol. Utilized by millions of activists, organizations, and artists across the globe, most people are probably unfamiliar with the design’s unique origins and the meaning behind the multi-pronged symbol.

Artist Gerald Holtom created the symbol for the first Aldermaston March in 1958, part of a series of anti-nuclear weapon demonstrations in the 1950s and 1960s. The symbol was next adopted by the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, and soon peace groups around the world displayed it in a variety of configurations. But what exactly does it mean?

Holtom designed the peace symbol around the visual language of flag semaphores, a telegraphy method for communicating with flags at a distance, combining the letters “N” and “D” standing for “nuclear” and “disarmament.”

Flag semaphores for the letters “N” and “D” and an overlay. Courtesy Wikipedia.

Holtom’s original 1958 sketches are now in extremely fragile condition and are rarely seen in public. However, a few of them, along with 300 objects from a century of anti-war activist campaigns in the UK, will be on view as part of People Power: Fighting for Peace at the Imperial War Museum in London from March 23 through August 28, 2017. You can read more about the peace symbol’s history over on Hyperallergic.

Hey art and design teachers, here’s a fun project idea: have students create new symbols for ideas important to them using flag semaphores or some other symbolic alphabet as a starting point. Send the results to [email protected] by March 20, 2017 with the subject ‘Peace Project‘ and we’ll share our favorites here on Colossal.

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