Design

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Art Design

The Uncomfortable: A Series of Inconvenient Household Items Designed by Katerina Kamprani

September 6, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

The Uncomfortable is a series of impractical household objects by Athens-based architect Katerina Kamprani. The infuriating works play off of common dishware, cutlery, and watering cans, making the task each is typically assigned either impossible or extremely difficult. Every object is created from the material it would be constructed from normally, making siamese wine glasses and linked ceramic mugs all the more humorous.

Often before Kamprani creates the physical object, she will create a 3D model to test its shape. Two of my favorite hypothetical pieces are her toeless rainboots and concrete umbrella, neither of which have been physically produced.

To see more of her works from The Uncomfortable check out the architect’s Tumblr and Facebook.

 

 



Design Food

Bold New Mathematical Cake Designs by Dinara Kasko

September 5, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Tart #4. Streusel, almond sponge cake, cherry confit, yogurt mousse.

Since we last checked in with Dinara Kasko, the Ukrainian pastry chef has continued to innovate at a dizzying pace, further incorporating her use of mathematical algorithms and 3D printing into her baking process. Many of the cake designs begin as a collaboration with mathematicians or sculptors who help develop the patterns she then utilizes to print special molds. The final desserts are interpretations of cakes, tarts, and other fully edible desserts that might look more at home inside an art gallery than on a dinner table.

Kasko now sells a variety of silicone molds on her website so you can try your hand at many of the desserts seen here. You can follow more of her baking experiments on Instagram.

A post shared by Dinara Kasko (@dinarakasko) on

Collaboration with parametric designer Andrej Pavlov.

Composition: streusel, almond cream, confit strawberry – red currant, mousse with white chocolate.

Composition: crunchy layer, sponge cake with dry apricot, cremeux dulcey-apricot, confit apricot-kumquat, mousse dulcey-apricot.

Composition: light sponge cake with candied grapefruit, mousse-meringue with grapefruit, grapefruit slices in syrup and mousse with white chocolate.

A post shared by Dinara Kasko (@dinarakasko) on

“Ball, Cube, Triangle.” Inside: mousse with caramelized white chocolate, blueberry confit, blackcurrant confit, chocolate sponge cake with red currant, berry glaze. For decoration: isomalt and chocolate.

“Voronoi cells with berries.”

 

 



Art Design

Unendurable Line: A Fun Short Film Tracks the Movement of Everyday Objects as a Real-Time Graph

September 5, 2017

Christopher Jobson

There’s simply no compelling way to describe this unusual short film from director Daihei Shibata which attempts to plot the movement of everyday objects such as a light switch or a spring as a real-time graph. Sibata explains this as a film that expresses “the various thresholds hidden in everyday life.” OK, interesting enough, but when paired with a score by the EX NOVO Chamber Choir—turn up the volume—it suddenly becomes completely amazing. I’d love to see a whole series of these. If you like this, all check out The Beauty of Mathematics. (via The Awesomer)

 

 



Design

Innovative New Playscape Designs by MONSTRUM Appear in Playgrounds Around the World

August 29, 2017

Christopher Jobson

For the last several years, Danish design firm MONSTRUM (previously) has constructed wildly imaginative playscape features for playgrounds around the world with an intense focus on both artistic and architectural quality. The playgrounds are designed and built locally in their large studio just outside Copenhagen and then shipped in components to sites around Denmark, Sweden, Russia, and even Dubai. The design studio has a strong background in theatrical set design which lends itself to their thematic playscapes, one of our recent favorites being the “Justin Beiver” playround in Partille, Sweden. Collected here is a sampling of designs from the last few years, but you can see more on their website.

Studio view

 

 



Crafts Design

The Painstaking 12-Month Process of Crafting a Traditional Korean Inlaid Lacquer Box

August 25, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

This four and a half minute-long video from Victoria & Albert Museum condenses the twelve months of meticulous labor that are required to make a traditional Korean inlaid lacquer box. Featuring skilled craftsman Lee Kwang-Woong, the video shows each of the many steps, starting with harvesting sap from a lacquer tree, and including fret sawing, charcoal polishing, and lacquer curing. Although we’re just spectators in the process, the behind-the-scenes footage makes the final product shots that much more satisfying. (via Core77)

 

 



Art Design

New Miniature Mobile Homes Created From Balsa Wood by Vera van Wolferen

August 24, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Dutch artist Vera van Wolferen (previously here and here) imagines new designs for homes on-the-go, producing miniature balsa wood models of tiny houses that teeter on the top of sedans or contain wheels to propel themselves on the road. The sculptures, which she refers to as Story Objects, are intended to allude to narratives, and are often built with the addition of cotton to serve as clouds or tiny puffs of chimney smoke. The rest of the miniature house is left as minimal as possible, van Wolferen focusing on the architecture of the object rather than a complicated color scheme.

You can see a 360 degree video for a piece she’s titled Jeep Safari for the Cultural Anthropologist in the video below, and view more of her miniature homes on her InstagramFacebook and Behance.

 

 



Design

A Secret Work Studio Suspended Below a Highway Overpass by Fernando Abellanas

August 21, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

All images by Jose Manuel Pedrajas, courtesy Lebrel

Spanish furniture designer Fernando Abellanas has carved out a new creative home in a section of Valencia that isn’t the typical artist neighborhood: he’s built a studio affixed to a highway underpass. The workspace is complete with a desk and chair, as well as shelves stocked with homey framed artworks and potted succulents―all attached to the highway’s cement framework. The floor and walls function as a self-operated horizontal elevator. Using mechanics adapted from a metal dolly, Abellanas hand-cranks his way to his studio, completing the picture of a cozy four-walled workspace.

As he described in an interview with le cool Valencia, Abellanas has a lifelong interest in refuges―locating peace and solitude in unexpected places, like under the dinner table as as a child, and now, hidden underneath the whir of traffic. The designer is also inspired by the way people with very limited resources use neglected spaces to create homes.

The studio hasn’t been sanctioned by the city of Valencia, so its exact location is a secret, and it will remain intact for as long as Abellanas is able to keep it there. You can follow more of Abellanas’ work  for his brand Lebrel via Instagram and Facebook, and the video below (in Spanish) offers a closer look. (via FastCo)