A Paper Memo Pad That Excavates Objects as It Gets Used

January 15, 2018

Johnny Strategy

Leave it to the stationery-loving Japanese to come up with a new way to enjoy writing notes. The Omoshiro Block (loosely translated as ‘fun block’) utilizes laser-cutting technology to create what is, at first, just a seemingly normal square cube of paper note cards. But as the note cards get used, an object begins to appear. And you’ll have to exhaust the entire deck of cards to fully excavate the hidden object.

Produced by Japanese company Triad, whose main line of business is producing architectural models, the Omoshiro Blocks feature various notable architectural sites in Japan like Kyoto’s Kiyomizudera Temple, Tokyo’s Asakusa Temple and Tokyo Tower. The blocks are composed of over 100 sheets of paper and each sheet is different from the next in the same way that individual moments stack up together to form a memory.

But despite the declining cost of laser-cutting technology, the Omoshiro Blocks are still quite expensive and range from around 4000 yen to 10,000 yen, depending on their size. Getting your hands on one will also be tricky for the time being as they’re currently only available at the Tokyu Hands Osaka location. But you can keep up with updates from the company by following them on Instagram. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)



Craft Design Photography

Custom Hand-Knit Sweaters Blend Subjects into Urban Environments

January 12, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Over the last four years, photographer Joseph Ford (previously) has collaborated with friend and knitter Nina Dodd to create a project that blends models into their environments rather than having them stand out. Each subject wears a custom hand-knit sweater by Dodd that transforms their torso, partially camouflaging their body into a highly textured wall, striped running track, or for one pooch—the leaves of dense shrub.

The series, Knitted Camouflage, also features a collaboration with French street artist Monsieur Chat who painted one of his trademark cats on the wall of a derelict factory for the photographer. You can take a peek behind the scenes of Ford’s photographic projects on his Facebook and Instagram.




Colored Pencils That Sharpen Into Symbolic Japanese Flowers and Plants

January 11, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Japanese Designer Toshihiro Otomo has designed a set of flower-shaped colored pencils that delicately shed their petals when sharpened. The writing utensils were inspired by the shape and color of Japan’s most symbolic plants, which include dandelions, bellflowers, and cherry and plum blossoms.

The pencils are made at an environmentally-conscious factory in Japan, and manufactured from recycled paper pulp. The set of five comes packaged inside a minimally designed pentagonal box which is currently available in Spoon & Tamago’s online shop.



Design Food

Stairstep Chocolates Designed by Universal Favourite Stack into Cubes of Complementary Flavors

January 5, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Anyone who’s looked down and realized their plate is all beige has felt the full force of the role of color in what we eat. Universal Favourite takes the visual element to another level with their modular Complements chocolate. The Australian design studio created the project as a client gift and developed it into a collaboration with sweets experts Bakedown Cakery. Each modular staircase-shaped chocolate (blackcurrant, cherry, cookies and cream, fairy floss, lemon, matcha, pistachio, shortbread, single origin dark, strawberry, vanilla, and watermelon) fits together with a complementary flavor to form a very visually appealing cube. Bakedown also shares their handiwork on Instagram, as does Universal Favourite. (via Ignant)



Colossal Design

Tokyo Lights up at Night in New Glow-In-The-Dark Furoshiki Scarf

January 3, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Famed for its radiant skyline at night, Tokyo glows on The LINK Collective’s newest addition to their modern furoshiki line. Featuring a special soft touch glow-in-the-dark paint, the design by Hannah Waldron captures the Japanese megalopolis’s towering architecture in a contemporary, slightly abstracted design. Mount Fuji and a star-spangled sky watch over the city on a background of cerulean blue, accented with red and white. Throughout the day, the glow-in-the-dark paint absorbs ambient light, and at night the city’s windows light up.

Furoshiki, the classic Japanese square textile, are meant to be used for a variety of purposes from wrapping packages to picnic blankets and of course, as a scarf. The LINK Collective works with Japanese craftsmen and artists from around the world for their line of hand-made furoshiki. Tokyo and other designs are available in The Colossal Shop.



Art Design

Nature-Based Textiles by Vanessa Barragão Highlight Ecosystems Above and Below the Sea

December 29, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Portuguese textile artist Vanessa Barragão produces carpets and tapestries from a variety of different techniques, creating multi-faceted landscapes with the use of latch hooking, crochet, weaving, basketry, and felt. Her environmental works present imitation coral, fungi, and algae as three-dimensional elements in plush contexts such as the circular work viewed above which she calls Earth Rug. The piece was developed for this year’s Milan Design Week and spans nearly 15 feet in diameter.

You can shop Barragão’s smaller coral-decorated textiles on her Etsy Shop, and view more of her larger works on her Instagram and Behance. (via Lustik)



Design Photography

Breathtaking Interior Images of Copenhagen’s Rare Expressionist Church

December 19, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Copenhagen’s Grundtvig’s Church is a rare example of expressionist church architecture, and one of the most well-known churches in the Danish city. French photographer Ludwig Favre was attracted to the perpendicular lines that compose the early 20th-century structure, in addition to the nearly six million yellow bricks that fill its interior. Favre decided to shoot the building’s 1800-seat congregation, capturing the minimal ornamentation found in the famous church’s massive vaulted halls and nave.

Favre is a photographer that specializes in major city landscapes, and has a history of shooting interiors, including his work at the La Sorbonne, and other cultural destinations around Paris. You can see more of his images on Instagram and Behance. (via This Isn’t Happiness)