Category: Design

Buildings and Stars Cut into Blackout Curtains Turn Your Windows Into Nighttime Cityscapes 

A Ukrainian blind company called HoleRoll shared this fun set of concept blinds that feature iconic cityscapes cut into blackout curtains. The silhouettes of famous skyscrapers become apparent as light streams in through the window. The images were posted back in 2014 and it looks like their website is currently down, so not sure if they’re available anywhere. Could make a fun DIY project? (via Laughing Squid, Reddit)

Update 1: Aalto+Aalto has a similar concept from 2006 called Better View.

Update 2: It looks like their website is back up. Thnx, Jann.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

The Skewed Classical Furniture of Sebastian Brajkovic 

Stretched like a digital glitch, these distorted chairs by Dutch artist Sebastian Brajkovic appear more like a product of Photoshop than a physical object. The Paris-based sculptor has been turning heads (and twisting necks) at art museums and galleries for over a decade with his ongoing Lathe series that imparts elements of the digital world onto classical furniture designs. Brajkovic extrudes the seats, backs, and even the designs printed on them to form wild new chairs with varying degrees of functionality.

Brajkovic’s work is now part of the permanent collections at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and the Museum of Arts and Design in New York. You can see more of his recent work on Artsy. (via Visual Fodder)

See related posts on Colossal about , .

The New ‘NeoLucida XL’ Camera Lucida Makes it Easier to Trace What You See 

Artist and SAIC professor Pablo Garcia (previously) has added an update to his previous take on the two century old Camera Lucida, an optical device that allows you to trace images and scenes directly from life. The new version, NeoLucida XL, is similar to its predecessor, however with a much larger viewfinder. The prism inside the updated analog device remains the same size, while the larger mirror and glass make it much easier to draw the projected “ghost image.” You can read more about the device on its Kickstarter page.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Geometric Wood Toys by Designer Mat Random 

Argentina-based toy designer Mat Random has designed a new geometric wood figure as a follow-up to his previous piece The Feline, another posable toy that he has named The Simian. Due to similarly placed joints for the animals’ legs and head, parts can be swapped between the two breeds to create an entirely new hybridized creature. Each low poly work can also be posed on two or four legs by maneuvering the object’s nine components, adding a puzzle-like quality to the wooden toys. You can see more of Random’s designs on his website and Behance.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Take a Tour of a Japanese Manhole Factory Where Neighborhoods Create Their Own Designs 

In most countries, the design of manhole covers is scarcely given a second thought other than the basics of material and a generic pattern resulting in drab metal circles with a purely utilitarian function. But after World War II, city planners in Japan proposed the idea of allowing each local municipality to design their own manhole cover as part of an effort to raise awareness for costly sewage projects. Designs would reflect local industry, culture, and history. The result was a huge success, and now over 19,000 manhole cover designs can be found embedded across 95% of all municipalities in Japan.

John Daub from ONLY in Japan recently visited the Nagashima Imono Casting Factory to see how the manhole covers are designed and built. He also stopped by an annual gathering of enthusiasts called the Manhole Summit that began in 2014, and learned about a new deck of Japanese Manhole Trading Cards.

If you can’t make it to Japan anytime soon, you can go on your own manhole adventure by exploring the Instagram hashtag #japanesemanhole. (via The Kid Should See This)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Hand-Painted Planetary Push Pins 

Tokyo-based industrial designer Duncan Shotton (previously) is known for his unique approach to houseware and stationery design, where he takes common objects from pencils to bookmarks and conceives of a novel twist. His latest creation is a series of push pins designed to look like the solar system called Planet Pins. The set includes the 8 planets (sorry Pluto fans) and an optional moon pin cast in concrete. Planet Pins just launched on Kickstarter and 100 sets are available as a signed limited edition.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Page 4 of 214«...3456...»