Category: Food

Printed Short Stories That Double as Wine Bottle Labels 

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All images via Reverse Innovation

Combining two of my favorite winter (or rather any season) activities is the project Librottiglia, a newly designed set of wines which feature short stories built into their labels. The texts are printed on textured paper stock, minimally designed, and secured to the bottle with a single piece of twine, providing an alternative to both digital methods of reading and traditional books. Not only are the selected works aesthetically matched to the bottle, but the content is also curated to align with the taste profiles, the characteristics of the work conceptually paired to each blend.

Three writers were selected to contribute to the project, each bringing their unique style to their matched wine. Journalist and satirist Danilo Zanelli contributes the mystery “Murder” to a Roero Arneis, “The Frog in the Belly,” a fable by Patrizia Laquidara is paired with an Anthos, and Regina Marques Nadaes’s love story “I Love You, Forget Me” compliments the winery’s Nebbiolo Roero.

The project is a partnership between the product design agency Reverse Innovation and Italian winery Matteo Correggia, and is named based off of the Italian translations of the words book (libro) and bottle (bottiglia). You can learn more about the project on Librottiglia’s website. (via designboom)

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DIY Edible Glass Cats: A Translucent Feline Water Cake that Melts Away in Minutes 

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In 2014, a dessert shop in Hokoto, Japan called the Kinseiken Seika Company exploded in popularity when the internet discovered their crystalline mizu Shingen mochi, a completely translucent edible cake that looks like a huge water droplet. The sweet gelatinous rice cake comprised mostly of mineral water and agar is so delicate it can only stand at room temperature for about 30 minutes before disappearing into a lumpy puddle.

Earlier this month Twitter user @mithiruka took a modified recipe for the mizu Shingen mochi and paired it with a silicon cat mold to make this jelly-like cake that’s now being shared by cat lovers across the internet—apparently there’s quite a few of them. (via RocketNews, My Modern Met)

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A Peek Inside Japanese Candy Sculptor Shinri Tezuka’s Amezaiku Studio 

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At the age of only 27, self-taught candy sculptor Shinri Tezuka (previously) may be one of the youngest practitioners of amezaiku, the dwindling art of candy crafting. Even though the craft dates back hundreds of years, there are only two known candy makers in all of Tokyo who roll, sculpt, and paint lollipops in this manner. Great Big Story recently stopped by Tezuka’s workshop for a quick video interview you can see below.

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Polygons: A Versatile Measuring Spoon Inspired by Origami Folds 

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Instead of juggling a ring of measuring spoons while cooking in the kitchen, what if standard measurements were combined into a single flat tool that adjusted at the pinch of your fingers. Is this a problem that needs a solution? Perhaps. Currently funding on Kickstarter, Polygons is a rather ingenious looking measuring spoon tool that combines four fractional measurements (in teaspoon and tablespoon models) into a flat tool that folds like a piece of origami paper. The gadget is made from recyclable plastic and the designers claim it can “flex for 100,000 cycles without failure.” Learn more here. (via Twisted Sifter)

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Stranger Wine: Hand-Blown Glass Wine Decanters by Etienne Meneau Mimic Blood Veins and Root Systems 

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Artist Etienne Meneau creates radical interpretations of a traditional wine decanter by utilizing the abstracted forms of blood veins, hearts, and root systems. Each container from his “Strange Carafes” series is hand-blown from borosilicate, and while many of the objects are technically functional, others serve as sculptural objects with the wine permanently encased within. The depth and diameter of each piece is such that it perfectly contains a single bottle of wine. Meneau shares plenty of photos and videos of each limited-edition piece on a series of mini websites a\here. (via My Modern Met)

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