Food

Section



Food Photography

Recipes Organized into Component Parts in Food Styling Photos by Mikkel Jul Hvilshøj

October 19, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

All photos © Mikkel Jul Hvilshøj

In a shoot for Nordic cookware brand Eva, Copenhagen-based photographer Mikkel Jul Hvilshøj lets the ingredients speak for themselves. With his flatlay photos on rich matte backgrounds, Hvilshøj creates compositions of raw recipe materials like carrots, star anise, and lemon that seem to suggest that the cookware itself is an essential element in classic Scandinavian food and drink. You can see the full series on Behance.

 

 



Art Food

Decadent Pastries Formed From Porcelain and Glass by Shayna Leib

October 12, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

All photos by Eric Tadsen

Glass artist Shayna Leib (previously), like anyone, is deeply attracted to the seductive pull of decadent desserts. Unlike most however, Leib is unable to indulge. Her body reacts to several aspects of puffed pastries and chocolate mouses, causing her to have many severe dietary restrictions. It was this void that pulled her towards the desire to work with the unattainable, to recreate the objects she couldn’t eat.

“This body of work started as a therapeutic exercise in deconstruction and a re-training of the mind to look at dessert as form rather than food,” says Leib in an artist statement about her series Patisserie. “It soon became a technical riddle, and I became a food taxidermist of french pastries.”

To create the glossy sculptures she combines elements of porcelain and glass, utilizing nearly every technique for both to achieve the hyperrealistic quality of each faux dessert. Like a typical French pastry would be rolled, glazed, baked, and trimmed, Leib hot-sculpts, fuses, casts, grinds, throws, and even pipes with a theme-appropriate pastry tube. You can view more of her sweet imitations on her website, Instagram, and Facebook.

 

 



Design Food

Bold New Mathematical Cake Designs by Dinara Kasko

September 5, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Tart #4. Streusel, almond sponge cake, cherry confit, yogurt mousse.

Since we last checked in with Dinara Kasko, the Ukrainian pastry chef has continued to innovate at a dizzying pace, further incorporating her use of mathematical algorithms and 3D printing into her baking process. Many of the cake designs begin as a collaboration with mathematicians or sculptors who help develop the patterns she then utilizes to print special molds. The final desserts are interpretations of cakes, tarts, and other fully edible desserts that might look more at home inside an art gallery than on a dinner table.

Kasko now sells a variety of silicone molds on her website so you can try your hand at many of the desserts seen here. You can follow more of her baking experiments on Instagram.

A post shared by Dinara Kasko (@dinarakasko) on

Collaboration with parametric designer Andrej Pavlov.

Composition: streusel, almond cream, confit strawberry – red currant, mousse with white chocolate.

Composition: crunchy layer, sponge cake with dry apricot, cremeux dulcey-apricot, confit apricot-kumquat, mousse dulcey-apricot.

Composition: light sponge cake with candied grapefruit, mousse-meringue with grapefruit, grapefruit slices in syrup and mousse with white chocolate.

A post shared by Dinara Kasko (@dinarakasko) on

“Ball, Cube, Triangle.” Inside: mousse with caramelized white chocolate, blueberry confit, blackcurrant confit, chocolate sponge cake with red currant, berry glaze. For decoration: isomalt and chocolate.

“Voronoi cells with berries.”

 

 



Crafts Food

New Edible ‘Amezaiku’ Animal Lollipop Designs by Shinri Tezuka

August 24, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Based out of a Tokyo candy shop called Ameshin, candy artisan Shinri Tezuka (previously) crafts some of the most unusual lollipops you’re ever likely to eat from wiggling goldfish to statuesque lions or prickly hedgehogs. The translucent candy seems to have more in common with glassmaking than confectionery design, and perhaps it’s no surprise that the process of working with hot sugar even shares similar tools—a traditional Japanese craft called amezaiku. Tezuka recently shared a variety of new lollipop designs on his Instagram account and you can step inside the Ameshin candy shop in a video from DogaTV below.

 

 



Crafts Food

New Needle Felted Food and Animal Friends by Hanna Dovhan

August 16, 2017

Christopher Jobson

The word “cute” is woefully insufficient in describing the squee-inducing impression of these needled felted wool sculptures by Ukraine-based designer Hanna Dovhan (previously here and here). Her latest pairs of hand-made mustachioed donuts, mushrooms, croissants, and veggies are all designed to rest in a tender embrace or to simply hold hands. You can see more by following her on Instagram or in her Etsy shop Woolsculpture.

 

 



Design Food

Abstract Cakes Topped With Chocolate Brushstrokes

June 27, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Moscow-based bakery Kalabasa takes a more abstract view of cake decorating, mounting its confections with stiff swipes of chocolate that look like painted brushstrokes. The colorful cakes and cupcakes are each decorated with layers of the crisp painterly gestures, and often drizzled with similar colors to tie together the whole production. You can view more of the artistic treats in a variety of shades on the bakery’s Instagram. (via Design You Trust)

 

 



Design Food

Polluted Water Popsicles: Faux Frozen Treats Highlight Taiwan’s Water Pollution Problem

June 7, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

via @bebeelai

via @bebeelai

Focused on environmental change rather than flavor, art students Hung I-chen, Guo Yi-hui, and Cheng Yu-ti from the National Taiwan University of the Arts concocted a line of “frozen treats” titled Polluted Water Popsicles. The group collected polluted water from 100 locations in Taiwan, first freezing the collected sewage samples and then preserving their creations in polyester resin.

At first glance the visually pleasing treats seem to imitate the aesthetic of recent craft and artisanal food trends. However on closed inspection you can identify the trash contained within each mold—bits of plastic, bottle caps, and wrappers lying within the popsicles’ murky waters.

The project is intended to spread awareness about water pollution and its deep effect on our world’s population. The 100 pieces, which also included designed wrappers, was nominated for the Young Pin Design Award and featured in the New Generation of Design Exhibition this May at the Taipei World Trade Center. You can view more of the creatively designed inedible works in the video below. More information about the project can be found on the group’s Facebook. (via Mashable and Quartz)

via @fengfeng210

via @fengfeng210

via @_rokaro_

via @_rokaro_

 

 

A Colossal

Highlight

Animal Multi-Tool