Illustration

Section



Illustration

New Psychedelic Tattoos Splashed with Neon Detail by Joanna Swirska

May 21, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Wrocław-based tattoo artist Joanna Swirska, aka Dżo (previously), produces nature-based tattoos through her own psychedelic lens. In one work a crystal-studded snail inches across ombre leaves, while in another, a ginkgo tree sprouts from the palm of a poised hand. Human forms are often overlaid with plants or animal motifs, such as her Frida Kahlo tattoo above which features the detail of a deep red bird mask inked across the painter’s face.

Dżo initially studied painting, and made her switch from canvas to skin about five years ago. You can follow more of her recent work on Instagram, and buy prints and other merchandise based on her tattoo designs from her online shop. (via Cross Connect Magazine)

 

 



Illustration

Imagined Insects Camouflaged as Star Wars Characters by Illustrator Richard Wilkinson

May 17, 2018

Christopher Jobson

UK-based illustrator Richard Wilkinson created a series of fantastical insects based on the most famous Star Wars characters. It’s easy to imagine these incredibly life-like renderings truly existing as creatures crawling on a planet far away, and each is given a cheeky scientific name with Latin roots that relate to its sci-fi counterpart like Roboduobus Deoduobus for R2D2 or Chaetebarbatus Bonamicii for Chewbacca. Wilkinson has previous experience creating scientifically-minded illustrations for publications like New Scientist and Intelligent Life Magazine.

These first 10 illustrations titled Insects From A Far Away Galaxy are just the first set in a much larger body of work for a planned book, Arthropoda Iconicus Volume I, that will make references to other pop culture characters like Pokemon, Marvel Comics, and Disney. The pieces seen here are now available as limited edition prints, and you can follow more of Wilkinson’s work on Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art Illustration

Quiet Scenes of Youthful Melancholy and Mystery by Aron Wiesenfeld

May 3, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

The Well, oil on canvas, 67 x 83 in.

In his dreamlike paintings, Aron Wiesenfeld depicts scenes of young women in moments of hushed reflection. Wiesenfeld’s artworks are often set outside in softly illuminated environments at twilight or dusk. Youthful female figures quietly observe their surroundings or are poised at the edge of entering a new realm. In an interview with Juxtapoz, Wiesenfeld describes how he finds and processes inspiration:

Ideas come from anywhere… places, memories, movies, art, etc. A book called Art and Fear said, ‘Notice what you notice.’ I thought that was great advice. So many times something that flashed by my consciousness might be lost just as quickly. There is a kind of discipline to saying, ‘Wait, there was something interesting there, what was it?’ Memory is so transitory… I want to get to my sketchbook as quickly as I can.

Wiesenfeld studied at The Cooper Union and ArtCenter College of Design and currently resides in San Diego, California. His upcoming solo show will be at Arcadia Contemporary in New York in 2019. Wiesenfeld occasionally offers signed print editions of his paintings via his website, and he has also published a book which compiles the last fifteen years of his artworks. You can stay up to date on new paintings and drawings via Instagram and Facebook. (via Arrested Motion)

Bunker, 2016, oil on linen, 32.5 x 44.5 in.

Homecoming, 2014, oil on canvas, 26.5 x 34 in.

Winter Cabin, oil on canvas, 30 x 41 in.

Bride, 2014, oil on canvas, 26.25 x 39.5 in.

God of the Forest, 2014, oil on canvas, 39.25 x 28 in.

October, 2014, oil on canvas, 22.75 x 35 in.

The Off Season, 2016, oil on linen, 26 x 33 in.

Night Grove, 2016, oil on panel, 19 x 24 in.

 

 



Illustration

Explore Dawid Planeta’s Mystical World of Bright-Eyed Animal Guides

May 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Polish artist and graphic designer Dawid Planeta summons large beasts in his series of mystical grayscale illustrations set deep in the jungle. The series, Mini People in the Jungle, presents animals in profile, with glistening eyes that illuminate the darkness surrounds them. A small child is also present in each work, bravely facing the towering creatures with a torch or outstretched arms.

Planeta works his own experiences into the mysterious work, channeling his history with depression into a source for creative energy. “Depression – it’s not easy to deal with, but when you try, you can stop thinking about it as a weakness and turn it into something brilliant,” said Planeta. “That’s what I aim to accomplish with my art. [The] things I’m trying to depict are dark, mysterious and frightening, but if you look closely, you will find excitement, passion and joy.”

You can see more jungle explorations from the artist on tumblr and Behance. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 



Art Illustration

Mysterious Anthropomorphic Illustrations of Dogs, Foxes, and Deer by Jenna Barton

April 16, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

American designer and illustrator Jenna Barton combines watercolor and digital processing to create mysterious anthropomorphic scenes of dogs, foxes, deer, and other four-legged beings. These eerily rendered creatures often have blank glowing eyes which suggest the animal is possessed or hiding a deep inner world.

Barton is based in Utah, which translates into her work through broad sweeping pastures and farmland illuminated by twilight. These settings add to the heightened tension presented in the animals’ demeanor, while providing a fitting background for her editorial illustrations, album art, game artwork and custom tattoos. You can buy select prints through her online store, and view more of her animal-based illustrations on Instagram and Tumblr.

 

 



Illustration

Delicate Inked Lines Form Fluffy Black Cats in Illustrations by Kamwei Fong

March 22, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Using only black ink, Malaysian illustrator Kamwei Fong has created a menagerie of playful black cats. Despite their contextual isolation and uniform style, each of Fong’s cats display unique personalities: some are fluffed and puffed into self-contained balls; others look with curiosity or wariness at fish that dangle or waves that crash from the animals’ own tails. The artist builds each feline form using innumerable short thin lines, varying the density of the marks to create volume as well as a palpable sense of furriness.

Fong has been working as an illustrator since 2010, under the moniker Bo & Friends, and in addition to his cat character, which he calls The Furry Thing, he dreams up similarly charming monkeys, goldfish, puppies, and other animals in his line-driven black ink drawings. Fong sells signed print editions of his animal illustrations in his Etsy shop, and also partners with Galerie Club Sensible in Paris. You can see more of his work on Instagram and Facebook.

 

 



Illustration

Clever Sketches by Christoph Niemann Turn Everyday Scenes into Humorous Moments

March 9, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Illustrator Christoph Niemann (previously) plays with scale and context to create small scenes using ink and everyday materials. In his object-focused works, a few deft brushstrokes turn a pair of socks into the head and torso of a dinosaur, and a pressed paintbrush flares into a dancer’s swinging skirt. Other sketches are based on photographs, usually of the streets of New York City where the artist lives. For the past few years, he has shared these illustrations each Sunday via Instagram. Niemann also sells prints of his series of Sunday Sketches, along with original drawings, in his online store. He has also published a book, Sunday Sketching.