Illustration

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Illustration Science

Playful Watercolors Illustrate the Many Classifications of the Animal Kingdom

June 15, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Illustrator and amateur naturalist Kelsey Oseid is focused on detailing the natural world, illustrating the animal kingdom’s many classes and orders on posters created with watercolor and gouache. The posters highlight more known orders such as Carnivora and Rodentia, while also showcasing the diversity of animals in lesser known orders like the Chondrichthyes and Artiodactyla. Oseid numerically labels the more common names of each animal in the footer of her works, pointing out where one can find the capybara, naked mole rat, and hammerhead shark.

The Minneapolis-based illustrator’s first book, What We See in the Stars: An Illustrated Tour of the Night Sky, comes out September 26 from Ten Speed Press. You can take a look at Oseid’s sketches and inspiration for her illustrations on her Instagram, and grab a poster for yourself on her Etsy. (via My Modern Met)

 

 



Art History Illustration

Download More than 2,500 Images of Vibrant Japanese Woodblock Prints and Drawings From the Library of Congress

June 14, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Thanks to the Library of Congress, you can browse and download high-resolution copies of more than 2,500 Japanese woodblock prints and drawings from the library’s online collection. The prints, most of which are dated before the 20th-century, were amassed from a large group of collectors, including notable donors such as President William Howard Taft and Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes.

Despite the diversity of genres and traditions represented by the library’s large collection, the most prolific works are ones created in the tradition of the Japanese art form of Ukiyo-e or Yokohama-e. Ukiyo-e was developed in the city of Edo (now Tokyo) between 1600 and 1868 during a relatively peaceful period. The subject and inspiration for many of the prints includes that of entertainment and leisure, such as scenes from kabuki theater and fashionable restaurants.

The style of Yokohama-e was built on methods of production from Ukiyo-e around the time that American naval officer Matthew Calbraith Perry (1794-1858) led an expedition to Japan in the mid-1850’s. New trade agreements between Japan and the West brought travers to the country, inspiring Japanese artists to capture tourists walking throughout the port city, and borrow images from Western newspapers.

You can see the entire collection of historic works on the Library of Congress’s website. (via Open Culture)

 

 



Art Illustration

A Giant Bosch-Inspired Watercolor by Illustrator Marija Tiurina

June 8, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Marija Tiurina‘s fantastical watercolor painting Eden is her biggest to date, measuring approximately 30 x 10 inches. The scene captures a woman kneeling amongst the inhabitants of a mythological forest, trapped within a busy scene that contains everything from an animated ramen bowl to an eel snaking its way through the center of her torso.

The painting was inspired by the chaos of Hieronymus Bosch‘s The Garden of Earthly Delights, Tiurina creating her own take on the hedonistic 15th century work. You can see more of her illustrations on the artist’s InstagramFacebook, and Behance, as well as a behind-the-scenes look into Eden in the video below.

 

 



Art Illustration

Segmented and Compartmentalized Graphite Portraits by Miles Johnston

June 7, 2017

Christopher Jobson

The female characters inhabiting the world of London-based illustrator Miles Johnston appear to be undergoing near perpetual transformation, their faces or bodies split in half, or their entire form morphing into globby organic forms. Over the past few years he’s examined four specific transformations organized into series titled Deform, Divide, Attract, and Recur. Johnston will have work on view at the upcoming Small Works exhibition at beinArt Gallery and you can also follow him on Instagram. (via Booooooom, Artnau)

 

 



Art History Illustration

Why Knights Fought Snails in the Margins of Medieval Books

June 1, 2017

Christopher Jobson

When thinking of a symbolic foe to battle in a medieval book, many creatures come to mind: dragons, wolves, or perhaps rabbits, but the poor defenseless snail? It hardly makes for a powerful image. But it turns out, as with most artwork, the answer is more symbolic than literal. In the 1960s a book historian named Lilian Randall thought the illustrations found in the margins of illuminated books required more attention, leading to the publication of her own book, Images in the Margins of Gothic Manuscripts. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards shares what Randall learned as she investigated the curious snail fights.

 

 



Animation Illustration

Animator Sasha Katz Explores a Symbiotic Relationship Between Plants and Technology

May 25, 2017

Christopher Jobson

There’s perhaps no two objects more different than a brand new laptop built in a sterile factory and a healthy living plant that’s evolved over millions of years, but for animator Sasha Katz the relationship between computers and plants is a bit more gray. As part of her ongoing GIF series that sees plant specimens sprouting from the glassy screens of iPhones or the keys of keyboards, Katz instead imagines a convergence, where computers can one day interface directly with organic life and perhaps the two become one. She also draws influence from pop art and the minimalism of 8-bit graphics, giving some of her pieces a nostalgic retro video game feel. You see many more of her GIFs on Instagram and GIPHY. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art Illustration

Eve: A New Intergalactic Woodcut Print by Tugboat Printshop

May 24, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Eve is the newest multi-colored woodcut print from Valerie Lueth of Pittsburgh-based Tugboat Printshop (previously here and here). The limited edition print is created from layering four different blocks, each containing a separate color. Once combined, an orange and green hand is seen suspended in the cosmos, flowers and plants growing wildly from the extended limb. The print is currently available for pre-order, with an anticipated ship date of mid-June. You can learn more about the making of Eve, as well as order your own print, on Tugboat Printshop’s website.