Category: Photography

Where the Internet Lives: The First-Ever Glimpse Inside Google’s Data Centers

So it really is a series of tubes. For the first time ever Google has posted dozens of rare photographs inside and around its data centers revealing the absurd level of organization, energy and design that goes into powering some of the largest, most powerful systems plugged into the internet. My absolute favorite aspect is the color-coordinated design of their infrastructure as it correlates to the Google logo. What wonderful attention to detail. See many more photos of their eight data centers and Street View imagery of their Lenoir, NC data center at Where the Internet Lives. All photos by Connie Zhou.

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Light Studies: Experimental Light Photos by Kim Pimmel

San Francisco-based UI designer and photographer Kim Pimmel creates extraordinary long exposure light photographs using a huge variety of common objects and technologies. Although the photos appear digitally rendered they actually merge simple things like ping pong balls, old turntables, and simple pendulums with LEDs, Arduino microcomputers, servos and other lighting mechanisms such as iPhone screens to make the photos you see here. His light studies set on Flickr is well worth your time and he also made a wild video using some of the same techniques. (via ruines humaines)

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Glittering Metallic Ink Clouds Photographed by Albert Seveso

I am completely unable to resist posting new work from photographer Albert Seveso (previously here, here and even here), and this continuation of his experimental underwater ink photography is no exception. For this new series, Il Mattino ha l’oro in bocca, Seveso uses accents of metallic inks to accentuate the rolling plumes of color as they disperse underwater. All photos courtesy the artist.

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Miniature Worlds Digitally Assembled from Hundreds of Photographs by Catherine Nelson

Sydney-based artist Catherine Nelson refers to herself as a painter with a camera, in that she doesn’t see the world as a photographer does but instead uses photos as a medium with which she creates these fantastic miniature worlds. Each work is comprised of hundreds of photographs which she digitally stitches together, drawing from an extensive background in visual special effects having worked on such films as Moulin Rouge, Harry Potter and 300. Of her work Nelson says:

When I embraced the medium of photography, I felt that taking a picture that represented only what was within the frame of the lens wasn’t expressing my personal and inner experience of the world around me. With the eye and training of a painter and with years of experience behind me in film visual effects, I began to take my photos to another level. The ‘Future Memories’ series comprises of 20 floating worlds, meticulously composed with thousands of assembled details. Visual poetry, nature photography and digital techniques blend together to give shape to these transcendental landscapes. The result is a contemporary pictorial mythology that subtly reminds the viewer of a profound truth: that it is in the flourishing variety of the local that the fate of the world resides.

Although the pieces are quite gorgeous to look at right here on Colossal, it’s hard to convey the resolution and scale of each piece which measures about 40×40″ (100x100cm), a level of detail that requires Nelson to spend nearly a month on each piece. It was my assumption based on the perspective and detail that some of these works must be somehow partially rendered in 3D, however she assured me via email that this is not the case. Though she uses digital editing to assemble them, they are almost purely based in photography. Incredible.

Nelson had several pieces on display earlier this month at fotofever in Brussels and will have work later this year at Gallery NOW in Seoul and at CONTEXT in Miami. You can see much more of her work at Galerie Paris-Beijing.

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Stunning Photographs of Antony Gormley’s ‘Another Place’ by Paul Sutton

Another Place is a collection of 100 cast iron figurative sculptures by artist Antony Gormley that was installed at Crosby Beach, England in the mid-2000s. The giant figures each weigh upward of 1,400 lbs (650 kg) and are spread across an area of beach nearly two miles long. Photographer Paul Sutton has spent the last few months capturing these wonderful images of the works, many more of which you can see over on his 500px page.

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New Rural Light and Book Installations by Rune Guneriussen

A grid of physical entities, 2012

A capacity to breed and recover, 2011

Circle of reception, 2011

An upward displacement, 2010

Resound with an echo, 2011

Revisit the revolution, 2012

Second system of ethics, 2012

Science of planting forest, 2010

Norwegian conceptual artist Rune Guneriussen (previously) explores a fascinating balance of human culture and nature with his outdoor installations of electric lamps, stacked books, chairs, and phones that appear to have gathered in small herds and swarms as if suddenly sentient. Each work is assembled and photographed on-site without any digital intervention in various rural locations around Norway. Guneriussen just updates his website with nearly two dozen new photos of works over the past three years (the photos are scattered around the site, but it’s well worth the clicking) and also opened a show at Rheingalerie Bonn gallery which runs through November 10. (via my modern met)

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Amazing Animations of Fruit and Vegetable MRIs


Corn


Corn


Broccoli


Broccoli


Garlic


Starfruit

Andy Ellison works at the BU medical school in Boston where he frequently works with a research-only MRI scanner. Over the past few months he’s been sharing some fantastic animated gifs of his calibration and quality control scans using assorted fruits, vegetables and other plants. As you can see the results are absolutely mesmerizing and I urge you to check out his blog, Inside Insides, for many more scans and hi-res images. Thanks to Ellison for exporting some slightly larger images for this post, sorry for the extra load! (via quipsologies)

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