Science

Section



Design Science

Discover What the Solar System Looked Like on the Exact Day of Your Birth

Discover What the Solar System Looked Like on the Exact Day of Your Birth

September 8, 2017

See full story

Kate Sierzputowski

The solar system is in constant rotation, a notion that has taken us generations to understand, and just as long to track. This knowledge has impacted our understanding of time, mathematics, science, and religion, yet the universe is still one of our greatest mysteries. SpaceTime Coordinates brings a personalized depiction to the great expanse of space by calculating the exact position of the planets on the day of your birth. More



Science

Go See This Eclipse: A Scaled Simulation by Alex Gorosh

Go See This Eclipse: A Scaled Simulation by Alex Gorosh

Aug.15.17

See full story

Christopher

In this new short film, director Alex Gorosh walks us through next week’s total solar eclipse and explains why it’s so important to see it. The mix of archival footage, scientific explanation, and a brief outdoor simulation to demonstrate scale similar to his 2015 video about the solar system, all make a compelling emotional argument that this eclipse shouldn’t be missed. More



Amazing Science

The Phenomenon Of “Crown Shyness” Where Trees Avoid Touching

The Phenomenon Of “Crown Shyness” Where Trees Avoid Touching

Aug.14.17

See full story

Christopher

Crown shyness is a naturally occurring phenomenon in some tree species where the upper most branches in a forest canopy avoid touching one another. The visual effect is striking as it creates clearly defined borders akin to cracks or rivers in the sky when viewed from below. Although the phenomenon was first observed in the 1920s, scientists have yet to reach a consensus on what causes it. More



Design Science

MIT Developed a Fabric That Can Fold Into Origami-Like Shapes When Inflated

MIT Developed a Fabric That Can Fold Into Origami-Like Shapes When Inflated

Aug.10.17

See full story

Kate

MIT Media Lab's Tangible Media Group has created a system to fold materials into various origami shapes when inflated, turning specifically designed paper, plastic, and fabric into representations of swans, helixes, or other 3D figures with minimal human interaction. The project, aeroMorph, utilizes special software to program the geometry needed for each three-dimensional shape and exports the information as digital fabrication files. After this, specific markings are heat-sealed onto the provided material on a large robotic platform, allowing it to bend at specific joints when filled with a steady stream of air. More



Photography Science

A Photographer Captures the Unusual Way Sperm Whales Sleep

A Photographer Captures the Unusual Way Sperm Whales Sleep

Jul.4.17

See full story

Kate

Photographer Franco Banfi and a team of scuba divers were following a pod of sperm whales when suddenly the large creatures became motionless and began to take a synchronized vertical rest. This strange sleeping position was first discovered only in 2008, when a team of biologists from the UK and Japan drifted into their own group of non-active sperm whales. After studying tagged whales the team learned this collective slumber occurs for approximately 7 percent of the animal’s life, in short increments of just 6-24 minutes. More



Illustration Science

A Neural Network Generates Surprisingly Elegant Images of Dinosaurs Composed of Plants

A Neural Network Generates Surprisingly Elegant Images of Dinosaurs Composed of Plants

Jun.20.17

See full story

Christopher

Artist and writer Chris Rodley utilized a deep learning algorithm to create these really lovely illustrations of dinosaurs composed of plants. The images were generated with an online service called DeepArt that lets you upload a “target” image and then apply a visual style to it. For step one he fed the network images of common dinosaurs and then applied the styles of 19th-century fruit engravings and botanical illustrations. The results are a sort of 21st-century artificial intelligence channeling Giuseppe Arcimboldo. More



Photography Science

Alexander Semenov Photographs Astonishing Creatures from the Depths of the World’s Oceans

Alexander Semenov Photographs Astonishing Creatures from the Depths of the World’s Oceans

Jun.16.17

See full story

Christopher

If you’re like me, the only possible reaction to these recent photographs by marine biologist Alexander Semenov is “What is that? What is that?! WHAT IS THAT!?” Semenov is the head of the diving at Moscow State University’s White Sea Biological Station where he brings nearly a decade of underwater photography experience to a wide variety of research and exploration projects. He focuses mostly on invertebrate animals found in the Arctic ocean: squishy, wiggly, translucent creatures from jellyfish to worms found deep underwater, most of which have never been documented with such detail and clarity. More



Illustration Science

Playful Watercolors Illustrate the Many Classifications of the Animal Kingdom

Playful Watercolors Illustrate the Many Classifications of the Animal Kingdom

Jun.15.17

See full story

Kate

Illustrator and amateur naturalist Kelsey Oseid is focused on detailing the natural world, illustrating the animal kingdom’s many classes and orders on posters created with watercolor and gouache. The posters highlight more known orders such as Carnivora and Rodentia, while also showcasing the diversity of animals in lesser known orders like the Chondrichthyes and Artiodactyla. More



Art Design Science

The First Blue Pigment Created in Over 200 Years to be Used in a Crayon

The First Blue Pigment Created in Over 200 Years to be Used in a Crayon

May.31.17

See full story

Kate

The first blue pigment to have been created in over 200 years will serve as the newest Crayola crayon. “YlnMn blue” was not developed within an arts context, but rather accidentally discovered in in an Oregon State University (OSU) chemistry lab in 2009. Graduate student Andrew Smith made the discovery alongside Mas Subramanian after combining manganese oxide, yttrium, and indium, elements which also serve as the inspiration for the pigment’s name. More



Amazing Photography Science

Fractal: A Magnificent Supercell Thunderstorm Timelapse by Chad Cowan

Fractal: A Magnificent Supercell Thunderstorm Timelapse by Chad Cowan

May.31.17

See full story

Christopher

For the last decade, Kansas-based photographer Chad Cowan has driven almost 100,000 miles across the United States chasing powerful supercell thunderstorms and recording them in high definition. The endeavor began as a personal project to capture a few storms as they developed but quickly grew into a full-blown obsession. Cowan has recorded hundreds of storms and condensed the highlights into this short film titled Fractal with editing help from Kevin X Barth. More



Amazing Animation Photography Science

Still Photos of Jupiter Taken by the Juno Spacecraft Set in Motion by Sean Doran

Still Photos of Jupiter Taken by the Juno Spacecraft Set in Motion by Sean Doran

May.29.17

See full story

Christopher

NASA’s Juno spacecraft launched in 2011, arriving at Jupiter in July of 2016 to begin a series of what will eventually be 12 orbits around the Solar System’s largest planet. The path selected for this particular mission is a wide polar orbit, most of which is spent well away from Jupiter. But once every 53 days Juno screams from top to bottom across the surface of the gaseous planet, recording data and snapping photographs for two hours. More