Science

Section



Animation Science

WWF: Earth Hour 2011

February 16, 2011

Christopher Jobson

A great new stop motion animation to promote Earth Hour using hundreds of people holding colored panels. The part with the bicycle is particularly special.

From its inception as a single-city initiative — Sydney, Australia – in 2007, Earth Hour has grown into a global symbol of hope and movement for change. Earth Hour 2010 created history as the world’s largest ever voluntary action with people, businesses and governments in 128 countries across every continent coming together to celebrate an unambiguous commitment to the one thing that unites us all — the planet.

Learn more at www.earthhour.org.

 

 



Art Science

Julia Feld

January 19, 2011

Christopher Jobson

There’s been no shortage of book and paper sculpture in this space lately but I’m making no apologies. St. Louis-based scientist and artist (scientist! and artist!) Julia Feld makes delicately layered sculptures and topographies from dissected science and medical textbooks. Many are available through her shop, Holy Stokes.

 

 



Design Food Science

The Designers of Taste

December 15, 2010

Christopher Jobson

Whether you can afford it or not, the world of molecular gastronomy, the convergence of art, science, and food appears to be with us for a while as restaurants like Alinea and elBulli take honors as some of the best restaurants in the world. This new book, Cooking Science: Condensed Matter by Vicenc Altaio, Ferran Adria, and Josep Perello, is the physical catalog of a show presented in part by Harvard by the same name that sought to view gastronomy and nutrition through the eyes of scientists.

Cooking science invites us to look at cooking, gastronomy and nutrition through the scientist’s eyes and see them as a truly cultural activity which brings a wealth of knowledge into play. Challenging the predominance of visual culture, our eating habits and the pleasure of food privilege the senses of taste, touch, smell and even hearing. Perception and landscape define our cooking, but cooking also has a component of reflection and innovation based on scientific and technological research. […] This volume constitutes a unique document of this task. The book’s QR codes link the paper media with the digital media, augmenting the reality and giving further information.

You can see quite a few more pages from the book here. The question at the heart of this all, I suppose, is can food be regarded as true art? Or can science be art? Gah my eyes just crossed. (via we make money not art)

 

 



Science

Melting Rock with the Sun

November 28, 2010

Christopher Jobson

This is a clip from the Solar Furnace Research Facility in Southern France that has a device capable of focusing the sun’s rays into a giant death laser that reaches temperatures around 3,500 Fahrenheit (or 1,926 Celsius). The real kicker being that it only takes as much sun as would hit three sunbathers to melt rock. Goooo science! (via devour)

 

 



Design Science

Life Imitates Darkman and the 3D Skin Printer is Born

November 2, 2010

Christopher Jobson

OK so it doesn’t actually print the face of Liam Neeson (yet), but researchers at Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine have successfully tested a bioprinter that outputs living skins cells directly onto burn wounds.

It acts just like your home printer, right down to the inkjet valve and vials of skin-cell “ink” that it sprays onto a wound. The printed skin graft consists of two separate layers — one is a mixture of skin cells with fibrinogen and Type I collagen (which each help with blood clotting and scar tissue formation, respectively); the second layer is thrombin, another clotting agent. The whole mixture has “a consistency similar to jello — so that [it] will adhere to the wound,” say the researchers.

Head over to FastCo for more.

 

 



Art Design Science

Vanessa Ruiz Curates Anatomical Art on her Blog Street Anatomy

October 24, 2010

Christopher Jobson

So, this exists. Street Anatomy, created by Vanessa Ruiz, is a wonderful blog that documents the convergence of medicine, art, and design. I’ve spent all morning scrolling through the archives and you should too.

 

 



Art Science

Marin Sawa’s Sculptural Algaeriums

October 1, 2010

Christopher Jobson

British architect and meteorologist Marin Sawa builds sculptures out of farmed algae and assorted chemistry equipment.

Algaerium is textile-inspired design for ‘cultivating’ and producing green energy in style. It creates a domesticated mode of algaculture for our urban lifestyles in the space of interior to exterior. This means it acts as aquariums for algae and the ‘living’ design serves as a new type of plants designed with a new characteristic to visualize photosynthesis through colour change.

(via fastco)