Art

Inside the Well-Traveled Sketchbooks of Artist Dina Brodsky

October 6, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Artist Dina Brodsky has many focuses to her practice, painting in miniature on canvas and paper, and recently turning to her family, friends, and Instagram community to submit trees for her to reproduce in a drawn project titled “The Secret Life of Trees.” Throughout both of these processes she remains extremely attentive to her sketchbook, filling its pages with detailed drawings of architecture, wildlife, and scattered portraits of strangers that accompany her looped handwriting. The drawings are often finished with touches of watercolor, gouache, gold leaf, and found objects from her travels, like in one where she pastes a rupee note from India.

An exhibition of her series, “The Secret Life of Trees,” was recently shown at Bernarducci Meisel Gallery in NYC. Brodsky sells recently produced paintings and drawings on Etsy, and you can see more of her sketchbook works and miniatures on her Instagram.

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Craft Food

Egg Love and Other Felted Food Friends by Hanna Dovhan

October 6, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Ukrainian crafter Hanna Dovhan (previously) continues to produce squeal-inducing felt sculptures of foodie friends like this new egg design as well as pairs of cherries, bananas, and pears. She shares new designs on her Tumblr and occasionally sells new designs on Etsy.

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Art Design Food

Stranger Wine: Hand-Blown Glass Wine Decanters by Etienne Meneau Mimic Blood Veins and Root Systems

October 6, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Artist Etienne Meneau creates radical interpretations of a traditional wine decanter by utilizing the abstracted forms of blood veins, hearts, and root systems. Each container from his “Strange Carafes” series is hand-blown from borosilicate, and while many of the objects are technically functional, others serve as sculptural objects with the wine permanently encased within. The depth and diameter of each piece is such that it perfectly contains a single bottle of wine. Meneau shares plenty of photos and videos of each limited-edition piece on a series of mini websites a\here. (via My Modern Met)

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Amazing Science

Face of a Hummingbird Resembles a Baby Octopus

October 5, 2016

Christopher Jobson

As part of a fascinating courting behavior, this Costa’s hummingbird flares the feathers around its face to create a poof of iridescent pink that bears an uncanny resemblance to the shape of a cartoonish baby octopus. The near complete lack of interest from the female bird in this video is almost comical, there’s a metaphor here. (via Geyser of Awesome)

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Art Illustration

New Behind-the-Scenes Images of Irma Gruenholz’s Clay Portraits and Illustrations

October 5, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Madrid-based graphic designer and illustrator Irma Gruenholz (previously here and here), crafts her illustrations out of clay, turning the typically 2D medium on its head by creating brightly dressed figures in 3D environments. Gruenholz meticulously places and photographs each of the works, placing them in books, posters and advertisements. The artist is generous about letting her audience witness her process, snapping step-by-step images that outline actions such as making tiny sandals and arranging the hairs on a mermaid’s head.

This year, Gruenholz was shortlisted for the World Illustration Awards in London, and work is also included in the recent book “Alchemy: The Art and Craft of Illustration” now available in the Colossal Shop. You explore more of her ceramic illustration work on Behance and her website.

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Art History

Classic American Ephemera Recreated in Clay by Artist Kristen Morgin

October 4, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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“Monopoly” (2007) (Collection Kristen L. Morgin, image courtesy of the artist and Marc Selwyn Fine Art, Beverly Hills)

Kristen Morgin creates objects that at first seem forgettable. Each piece shows evidence of wear, containing the rust and rips of things that have ceased to be cared for long ago. Despite their appearance of cardboard, tin, and paper, the works, which reflect American culture’s ephemera, are actually created entirely from unfired clay. The records, VHS sleeves, board games, and figurines are all illusions, recreations of mementos lost to time.

Morgin keeps her pieces unfired to retain the natural texture and look of the clay, a material that changes drastically once altered by fire. Like the objects that they imitate, her sculptures are meant to eventually crumble, possibly holding an even shorter lifespan than what they resemble. The content of these works focuses on fantasy versus reality, highlighting celebrity and beauty that has long past, created by a material that is not what it seems.

Morgin’s work is included in the four-artist exhibition “Visions and Revisions: Renwick Invitational 2016” at the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Renwick Gallery in Washington, D.C. through January 8, 2017. (via Smithsonian Mag)

"Sorryland" (2012), unfired clay, paint, ink and marker, 28 x 20 1/2 x 3 3/4 inches (image courtesy of <a href="http://www.anthonymeierfinearts.com/artists/kristen-morgin/slideshow?view=slider#7" target="_blank">Anthony Meier Fine Arts</a>)

“Sorryland” (2012), unfired clay, paint, ink and marker, 28 x 20 1/2 x 3 3/4 inches (image courtesy of Anthony Meier Fine Arts)

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“The Repeating Table” (2010), wood, books, toys, records with clay painted counterparts, 45 x 68 x 108 inches (image courtesy of Zach Feuer)

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“150 Ways to Play Solitaire” (2010), wood, wire and unfired painted clay, 34 x 34 x 12 inches (image courtesy of Zach Feuer)

"Still Life As The Alphabet" (2013), unfired clay, paint, ink, graphite, wood, 5.5 x 37 x 2 in

“Still Life As The Alphabet” (2013), unfired clay, paint, ink, graphite, wood, 5.5 x 37 x 2 in (image courtesy of Zach Feuer)

"Still Life As A Conga Line" (detail), (2014), unfired clay, paint, ink, graphite, 18 x 96 inches

“Still Life As A Conga Line” (detail), (2014), unfired clay, paint, ink, graphite, 18 x 96 inches (image courtesy of Zach Feuer)

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“Ecstasy Pyramid” (2016), unfired clay, paint, ink, marker, crayon and graphite, 38 x 37 x 2 inches (image courtesy of Anthony Meier Fine Arts)

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“Another Wonderful Day” (2013), unfired clay, pint, ink, crayon, graphite, 12.25 x 12.25 x 0.25 inches (image courtesy of Zach Feuer)

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“Space Invader” (2012), unfired clay, paint, ink, graphite and wire, 13 3/4 x 16 1/2 x 1/4 inches (image courtesy of Anthony Meier Fine Arts)

 

 



Art Design Illustration

Ingenious Hack for Sketching with Two Point Perspective Using an Elastic String

October 4, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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This quick video demonstrates how to use a long elastic string anchored at the horizon of a canvas to sketch a drawing with two point perspective. With as many art and drawing classes I’ve taken, I’ve never seen this method used before. A more traditional and accurate method would involve a ruler and maybe a drafting table if you’re super fancy, but this seems like a great method for mocking up something quickly. The video posted on Facebook is uncredited and apparently came from Instagram. Anyone know the artist/designer? (via Reddit, The Awesomer)

A video posted by reza asgaripour (@architectdrw) on

Update: The individual demonstrating this technique is architect Reza Asgaripour.