Design History

The Timeless Beauty of Vintage Aerolux Light Bulbs Containing Floral Filaments

December 6, 2016

Christopher Jobson

From the 1930s through the 1970s, Aerolux Light Corporation produced these amazing novelty light bulbs that contained sculptural filaments in the shape of flowers, birds, and myriad other designs that would illuminate in different colors. The bulbs contained a mixture of neon or argon (or both) and some of the components were coated with phosphors to achieve different color effects. Via Wikipedia:

Aerolux gas discharge light bulbs contained low pressure gas, either neon or argon, or a mixture of the two. Also within the bulb were metal sculptures coated with phosphors. These phosphors fluoresced when excited by glow discharge. Because glow discharge occurs readily at 110-120 volts AC, one could use these bulbs in standard household lamps in the United States.

The phosphors used in the bulbs were somewhat brittle, necessitating care in handling. Shaking or jarring the bulbs would cause flaking and migration of the phosphors to other parts of the metallic sculpture. Such handling would leave non-fluorescing portions of the sculpture and/or migration of phosphors to other surfaces within the bulb.

At the height of production some of the bulbs sold for a mere .20 cents, but can now fetch hundreds of dollars on Ebay or Etsy. If you happen to be in New York you can see a bonafide Aerolux bulb that’s on permanent display at MoMA as part of an artwork by artist Dan Flavin. (via Neatorama, Geyser of Awesome, Oddity Central)

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Via CPS2

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Dan Flavin, Roses. Aerolux Flowerlite light bulb, ceramic flower pot, cord and light switch. 8 1/2 x 5 1/4″ (21.6 x 13.3 cm). Courtesy MoMA.

 

 



Art

A Surreal Three-Dimensional World Encased in Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin

December 5, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Installation view, courtesy GRIMM Gallery.

Dustin Yellin‘s latest installation (previously here and here) is more of an encased world than environment—ten modular glass blocks that together measure 20 feet long. Densely layered, each glass brick contains thousands of images meticulously sourced from magazines and books, arranged to created Yellin’s own alternate National Geographic universe. The pieces, which differ in dimension at the ends of the work and are uniformly sized near the middle, all contribute to a larger, and perhaps forecasted, story of war and peril. Not a pleasant look at the future of humanity, Yellin outlines scenes of greed and global warming, literally showing the fall of humanity from the tip of a glass-encased mountain to the depths of a turbulent sea.

This installation, titled Ten Parts, is part of a solo exhibition of Yellin’s work by the same name at GRIMM Gallery in Amsterdam which opens this Friday, November 25, and runs through January 7, 2017.

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Installation view, courtesy GRIMM Gallery.

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Installation view, courtesy GRIMM Gallery.

 

 



Art Craft

Tessellated Origami Sculptures by Goran Konjevod

December 5, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Origami artist Goran Konjevod brings an extensive background in mathematics and theoretical computer science into the folds of his elegant paper sculptures, textured abstract forms that twist, spiral, and cascade. Konjevod practiced origami as a hobby for many years, usually folding the designs of others until 2005 when he began producing some of his original designs. Most of his pieces involve tessellations where repetitive geometric designs are carefully folded to create patterns within the paper. (via Strictly Paper)

Recently Konjevod’s work has been collected and displayed in exhibitions like the recent 8th Annual Sanchez Art Center 50|50 Show and with the Ohio Craft Museum. You can find more work on his Instagram.

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Photography

Cloud-Like Explosions Photographed in Midair by Ken Hermann

December 3, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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For his latest photographic series Explosion2.0, Copenhagen-based photographer Ken Hermann went big. Partnering with a pyrotechnics expert, he captured this series of suspended explosions illuminated with a strobe light that seem to hover in the air like clouds. Each image is all the more mysterious because the origins of each detonation are obscured, as if the blasts were spontaneous. Explosion2.0 is the second in a series of photos that began with some slightly less controlled blasts in part 1. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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Design

360° Earth and the Moon Book by Yusuke Oono

December 2, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Book designer Yusuke Oono creates small books that unfold into 360° scenes revealing everything from fairy tales to high-end vehicles. His latest creation is a laser-cut Earth and Moon surrounded by clouds, stars, UFOs and other orbiting objects. Oono was born in Germany and was trained as an architect at the University of Tokyo, lending his design skills and understanding of materials to the concept of his innovative sculpture books.

The Earth & Moon book is now available in the Colossal Shop. Also check out his lovely Mt. Fuji book.

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Design

An ‘Infinite’ Galaxy Puzzle That Can Be Built in Any Direction

December 2, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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The team over at Nervous System recently designed this fun Infinite Galaxy Puzzle that tiles continuously in any direction. Pieces from the top can be removed and added to the bottom, and likewise from side to side. So regardless of where you start the puzzle can continue in a seemingly infinite series of patterns. Each puzzle is printed with satellite imagery obtained from NASA and includes a few themed pieces like an astronaut, shuttle, and satellite. Apparently the puzzles were wildly popular and are now available as a pre-order for 2017. (via My Modern Met)

Update: The Infinite Galaxy Puzzle is now available in The Colossal Shop.

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Photography

Photographer Andreas Levers Captures the Hazy Glow of Unpopulated Streets at Night

December 1, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Since 2013, photographer Andreas Levers has been photographing solitary landscapes at night, capturing the streets, train platforms, and gas stations that are rarely populated in the late evening hours. Each image is haunted by an eerie glow, scenes dotted by bursts of artificial illumination. The Potsdam-based artist is a media designer by day, whose spare time is spent focusing his camera on the stark architectural elements that surround him. You can see more images from Levers’ At Night series on his website and Behance. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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