Take a Death-Defying Ride Alongside India’s Well of Death Riders

Take a Death Defying Ride Alongside Indias Well of Death Riders stunts music video India documentary

Take a Death Defying Ride Alongside Indias Well of Death Riders stunts music video India documentary

Take a Death Defying Ride Alongside Indias Well of Death Riders stunts music video India documentary

This fantastic bit of filmmaking blends music video and documentary in a new clip for British rock group Django Django’s 2010 track WOR. The subjects of the video are Allahabad’s Well of Death riders who risk life and limb daily to earn money at local melas (fairs) by driving cars and motorcycles inside a temporary cylindrical structure about 25 feet high and 30 feet across. The cars are held in the air by centripetal force and needless to say there’s very little room for error. The Well of Death is extremely risky for both performers and audience members, but regardless, it frequently draws a huge crowd as evidenced in this video. Directed by Jim Demuth, based on an original concept by Vincent Neff. More music video documentaries, please. (via Vimeo)

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A Huge Submarine Bursts through the Streets of Milan

A Huge Submarine Bursts through the Streets of Milan submarines Milan installation advertising

A Huge Submarine Bursts through the Streets of Milan submarines Milan installation advertising

A Huge Submarine Bursts through the Streets of Milan submarines Milan installation advertising

A Huge Submarine Bursts through the Streets of Milan submarines Milan installation advertising

A Huge Submarine Bursts through the Streets of Milan submarines Milan installation advertising

As part of an absurdly clever advertising campaign orchestrated by ad agency M&C Saatchi Milano for insurance firms Europ Assistance IT and Genertel, a giant submarine was installed near the city center as if it had suddenly burst through the street. The carefully orchestrated stunt which unfolded on October 1st was complete with a live reenactment meant to reinforce the idea of safeguarding yourself and posessions against unforseen events. Read more over on Designboom. All images courtesy M&C Saatchi Milano. (via It’s Nice That)

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Cats Waiting for Fishermen to Return

Cats Waiting for Fishermen to Return cats black and white animals

Love this photo of what appears to be cats waiting for fishermen to return to port. The photographer is unknown but it appears to have first been posted here about two years ago. (via Classic Pics, Stellar)

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Vertical Aerial: A Monumental 3-Ton Aerial Mosaic of Johannesburg

Vertical Aerial: A Monumental 3 Ton Aerial Mosaic of Johannesburg sculpture mosaics Johannesburg Africa aerial

Vertical Aerial: A Monumental 3 Ton Aerial Mosaic of Johannesburg sculpture mosaics Johannesburg Africa aerial

Vertical Aerial: A Monumental 3 Ton Aerial Mosaic of Johannesburg sculpture mosaics Johannesburg Africa aerial

Vertical Aerial: A Monumental 3 Ton Aerial Mosaic of Johannesburg sculpture mosaics Johannesburg Africa aerial

Vertical Aerial: A Monumental 3 Ton Aerial Mosaic of Johannesburg sculpture mosaics Johannesburg Africa aerial

Vertical Aerial: A Monumental 3 Ton Aerial Mosaic of Johannesburg sculpture mosaics Johannesburg Africa aerial

Artist Gerhard Marx in conjunction with Spier Architectural Arts recently created an enormous sculptural mosiac of an aerial photograph of Johannesburg, South Africa. Seven professional mosaic artists, together with nine apprentices worked for 5 months to complete the project using natural stone such as marble and travertine, fragments of red brick, ceramic elements and chippings of Venetian smalti glass. In the end, the 56-panel aerial image weighs nearly three tons and was presented last month at the 2013 FNB Joburg Art Fair.

Watch the video above to see how the piece came together, and also learn about another work created through an additional partnership between Spier and artist Sam Nhlengethwa. (via Colossal Submissions)

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A Deadly Alkaline Lake in Africa Turns Animals into Calcified Statues

A Deadly Alkaline Lake in Africa Turns Animals into Calcified Statues lakes animals Africa
Calcified Fish Eagle, Lake Natron, 2012

A Deadly Alkaline Lake in Africa Turns Animals into Calcified Statues lakes animals Africa
Calcified Bat II, Lake Natron, 2012

A Deadly Alkaline Lake in Africa Turns Animals into Calcified Statues lakes animals Africa
Calcified Swallow, Lake Natron, 2012

A Deadly Alkaline Lake in Africa Turns Animals into Calcified Statues lakes animals Africa
Calcified Dove, Lake Natron, 2012

A Deadly Alkaline Lake in Africa Turns Animals into Calcified Statues lakes animals Africa
Calcified Flamingo, Lake Natron, 2012

A Deadly Alkaline Lake in Africa Turns Animals into Calcified Statues lakes animals Africa
Calcified Songbird, Lake Natron, 2012

Lake Natron in northern Tanzania is one of the harshest environments on Earth. Temperatures in the lake can rise to 140 °F (60 °C) and the alkalinity is between pH 9 and pH 10.5, almost as alkaline as ammonia. Animals who enter the water are almost certainly doomed, save certain kinds of fish that have evolved to survive in such a caustic environment.

While working Africa photographer Nick Brandt stopped by the lake to discover several dead animals on the shoreline. Birds and other small mammals that end up in the water gradually become calcified, turned to stone in the deadly water. Brandt tells NewScientist, “I could not help but photograph them. No one knows for certain exactly how they die, but it appears that the extreme reflective nature of the lake’s surface confuses them, and like birds crashing into plate glass windows, they crash into the lake.”

A Deadly Alkaline Lake in Africa Turns Animals into Calcified Statues lakes animals Africa

These photos and many more are included in Brandt’s new book, Across the Ravaged Land, a third and final volume of photography documenting the disappearance of animals in Eastern Africa. All photos copyright Nick Brandt, courtesy of Hasted Kraeutler Gallery. (via My Modern Met)

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A Brick Facade Appears to Melt Off of an Apartment Building in Margate

A Brick Facade Appears to Melt Off of an Apartment Building in Margate installation architecture
Photo by Stephen O’Flaherty

A Brick Facade Appears to Melt Off of an Apartment Building in Margate installation architecture
Photos by Stephen O’Flaherty

A Brick Facade Appears to Melt Off of an Apartment Building in Margate installation architecture
Photo by Stephen O’Flaherty

A Brick Facade Appears to Melt Off of an Apartment Building in Margate installation architecture
Photos by Stephen O’Flaherty

A Brick Facade Appears to Melt Off of an Apartment Building in Margate installation architecture
Photo by Stephen O’Flaherty

Created by British designer Alex Chinneck, this fun intervention creates the illusion that a brick facade has melted right off the side of a building and into the front yard. Titled From the Knees of my Nose to the Belly of my Toes, the piece was installed in the English seaside town of Margate, and the artist chose to present it without any identifying information, leaving locals amused and scratching their heads.

Chinneck spent the better part of 12 months engineering the installation and worked with several companies that offered to donate materials. He tells Dezeen that he’s fascinated with spectacles and that he “wanted to create something that used the simple pleasures of humour, illusion and theatre to create an artwork that can be understood and enjoyed by any onlooker.” The piece will be on view for a year before the building is eventually demolished. Read and see more over on Dezeen.

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Newspaper Pages Cut Like Embroidered Lace by Myriam Dion

Newspaper Pages Cut Like Embroidered Lace by Myriam Dion  pattern paper lace

Newspaper Pages Cut Like Embroidered Lace by Myriam Dion  pattern paper lace

Newspaper Pages Cut Like Embroidered Lace by Myriam Dion  pattern paper lace

Newspaper Pages Cut Like Embroidered Lace by Myriam Dion  pattern paper lace

Newspaper Pages Cut Like Embroidered Lace by Myriam Dion  pattern paper lace

Newspaper Pages Cut Like Embroidered Lace by Myriam Dion  pattern paper lace

Newspaper Pages Cut Like Embroidered Lace by Myriam Dion  pattern paper lace

Newspaper Pages Cut Like Embroidered Lace by Myriam Dion  pattern paper lace

Newspaper Pages Cut Like Embroidered Lace by Myriam Dion  pattern paper lace

Newspaper Pages Cut Like Embroidered Lace by Myriam Dion  pattern paper lace

Newspaper Pages Cut Like Embroidered Lace by Myriam Dion  pattern paper lace

Newspaper Pages Cut Like Embroidered Lace by Myriam Dion  pattern paper lace

Newspaper Pages Cut Like Embroidered Lace by Myriam Dion  pattern paper lace

Newspaper Pages Cut Like Embroidered Lace by Myriam Dion  pattern paper lace

Armed with a scalpel and latest edition of Le Devoir or the International Harold Tribune, Canadian artist Myriam Dion cuts rich textural patterns remeniscent of emroidered lacework right into the pages newspapers. Major design elements and photographs from the pages are often left intact or otherwise incorporated into her paper cuts, creating a strange element of harmony, as if the paper was always intended to look like this. It’s also amazing to consider that each tiny cut is made by hand, and yet more negative space is left behind than actual paper.

Dion, who is currently working on a masters degree in visual and media arts at the University of Quebec, has work in numerous upcoming exhibitions including Pulse Miami, Art Toronto 2013, and Foire en art actuel de Québec. (via Jealous Curator)

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