Design

Plant Party: A Greenhouse in Tokyo Bursts Into a Dazzling Light Show When You Touch the Plants Inside

October 24, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

An illuminated greenhouse fills Tokyo Midtown’s garden space, encouraging visitors to touch the variety of vegetables that grow inside. The functional plant shelter was created by design studio PARTY for the city’s 2017 Design Touch event, a month-long festival that focuses on the experiential elements of good design.

Each plant in the Digital Vegetables installation is rigged to trigger a symphony of light and sound when touched. Each color and noise reflect a specific aspect of the plant, allowing the visitor to connect to the organic matter with senses that lay outside of taste or smell.

“Sounds of rubbing seeds. Sounds of touching leaves. Sounds of eating fruits,” says Digital Vegetables’ Sound Designer Ray Kunimoto. “I recorded the sounds created with actual vegetables. Then, I mixed them with the sounds of orchestra instruments on the computer to make 7 melodies.”

Kunimoto’s technique makes sure there is a unique sound for each. When visitors touch a tomato they will hear the sound of a violin, carrots will trigger trumpets, and cabbages will activate the deep sounds of the oboe.

The installation is free, and will be displayed in Tokyo Midtown through November 5th, 2017. You can see the greenhouse in action in a short video of Digital Vegetables below. (via Spoon&Tamago)

 

 



Art

Three-Dimensional Portraits of Suspended Paint Strokes by Chris Dorosz

October 24, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Rather than considering paint as a liquid medium, San Francisco-based artist Chris Dorosz uses the traditional material as a unit of measure to form anonymous sculptural portraits. At first glance, the three-dimensional paintings read as abstract compilations of shapes, and only once the viewer looks head-on at the portrait does a human figure begin to emerge.

As he writes in his artist statement, Dorosz considers the paint drop to be “a form that takes shape not from a brush or any human-made implement or gesture, but purely from its own viscosity and the air it falls through, as analogous to the building blocks that make up the human body (DNA) or even its mimetic representation (the pixel).”

Dorosz is represented by Scott Richards Contemporary Art. The suite of four busts, entitled Rosh, is on view November 18, 2017 at the Muriel Guépin Gallery in New York.

 

 



Photography

Everyday Scenes Imbued With Surreal Mystery by Photographer Brooke DiDonato

October 23, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Brooklyn-based photographer Brooke DiDonato twists everyday scenes to include subtle elements of mystery or illusion. In her works, flowers protrude from city pipes or replace laces in a pair of dress shoes, while disembodied arms reach out from a wall of dense foliage. Each work suggests that there is something missing from the scene, a specific peculiarity that’s hard to pinpoint.

“The bulk of my images are set in real locations, but the characters in them are often exaggerated or imagined,” DiDonato told Colossal. “I’m interested in blending these different elements together and delivering them through a medium that was traditionally thought of as a way to archive our realities.”

DiDonato also creates videos that has the same dreamy perspective present in her static images. To see more of her work visit her website or Instagram.

 

 



Sponsor

Artist Bing Lin Discusses Her Experience with MassArt’s Dynamic Media Institute

October 23, 2017

Colossal

Bing Lin, “gameLAN 2.0” (2016) (all images courtesy the artist. MFA Dynamic Media Institute)

“The Dynamic Media Institute (DMI) at MassArt appealed to me because it connects research, fine art, and design thinking within a studio environment. It was a perfect place for me to study because it allowed me to pursue my work in a deep way through focused courses and one-on- one mentorship.

My thesis, gameLAN 2.0, was inspired by my experience playing in a Javanese Gamelan ensemble. By linking the sounds of drums, xylophones and string instruments to a visual medium, gameLAN 2.0 allows simultaneous translation from sound to visual projections.

MassArt’s digital fabrication lab enabled me to design and construct the object through which users translate the traditional gamelan sounds in new ways while witnessing a visual manifestation of their efforts. MassArt continues to be a unique place to call home and I am grateful to be apart of our strong alumni community.”

— Bing Lin (Design/Dynamic Media MFA ’16)

Learn more at massart.edu/graduate-programs.

Bing Lin, “gameLAN 2.0” (2016)

Bing Lin, “gameLAN 2.0” (2016)

 

 



Art Design

A 3D Zebra Stripe Crosswalk Appears in Iceland

October 23, 2017

Christopher Jobson

All photos by Gusti Productions

The quiet fishing town of Ísafjörður, Iceland now has one of the snazzier pedestrian crosswalks you’re likely to encounter: a traditional set of white zebra-stripes painted to appear three dimensional. The piece was created last month as part of a collaboration between street painting firm Vegi GÍH and the city’s environmental commissioner Ralf Trylla. The city hopes the piece serves both as an artwork and as a stronger visual cue that convinces motorists to slow at the crosswalk. See more in Iceland Magazine. (via Jeroen Apers, Swissmiss)

 

 



Design Illustration

Popular Electronics Brands Rendered as an Alphabet of Stylish Products

October 23, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Taking inspiration from a wide variety of electronic brands, designer Vinicius Araújo designed this alphabet of Helvetica letterforms, each modeled after a brand’s namesake product. The letter “N” for Nintendo becomes a retro-styled NES gaming system while the “B” for Beats grabs the aesthetic of comfy headphones. Araújo went even further with several of the letters to create a few brief animations. You can see the entire series titled 36days Electronics on Behance.

 

 



Art

A Towering Hammered Steel Lion by Selçuk Yılmaz

October 22, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Sculptor Selçuk Yılmaz (previously) recently finished work on this gigantic lion sculpture of hammered and welded metal titled Kali. The Turkish artist has mastered the ability to form the flowing mane, facial features, and bold muscular structure of various large cats from curled steel fragments. You can see many of his earlier works over on Behance.