Miniature Scenes With A Darkly Satirical Twist by Frank Kunert 

German photographer Frank Kunert builds miniature scenes that at first glance appear like mundane depictions of everyday domestic and urban settings. However after glancing at the photographs longer, one is able to dissect the strange anomalies found in his playgrounds, kitchens, and parks, noticing that his half pipe has the markings of a tennis court and his children’s slide leads straight onto a busy highway.

“On the surface, these photographs confront us with all of the hollow words, catchphrases and banalities we encounter in our daily lives,” says Dr. Christine Donat, who provided the text for Kunert’s online portfolio. “The stereotypical and senseless aspects of human communication cannot be unveiled more convincingly than in their literal conversion into a visual medium.”

The works are a part of Kunert’s series Photographs of Small Worlds, handcrafted models that play with the audience’s perception through the use of darkly satirical twists. Each miniature set is created over the course of several weeks to months, and are not captured until they can perfectly convey the scene without digital assistance.

Kunert’s upcoming solo exhibition at the Museum Boppard from September 10 to January 28, 2018 shares the same name as his most recent photo book, Wunderland. You can view more of his miniature works and past photo books on his website. (via Cross Connect Magazine)

 

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Digitally Rendered Alien Creatures by Zhang Chenxi 

For this ongoing series of digital illustrations titled “UNKNOWN × UNKNOWN,” designer Zhang Chenxi imagines an alien world crawling with gloopy, squishy, anemone-like creatures that share hybrid characteristics of plants and animals. Chenxi starts each piece as a concept sketch on paper and then models it in Cinema 4D before rendering in Octane. If you want to see more, he shares new works every few days on Instagram.

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Ultraviolet Break of Day: A Midnight Walk Through the Neon-Hued Streets of Asian Cities by Marcus Wendt 

While on a recent trip through Hong Kong, Shenzhen, and Seoul, London-based photographer Marcus Wendt found himself suffering from a bout of jetlag induced insomnia and ended up wandering the streets of several cities late at night. With a camera in-hand he captured these mesmerising shots that channel the cyberpunk vibe of movies like Bladerunner where narrow urban alleys are bathed in cool ultraviolet light. Over several days Wendt worked his way through the Kowloon area of Hong Kong and then Shenzhen’s Huaqiangbei area known for its sprawling electronics market, before eventually traveling to Seoul. You can see more from the project on his website. (via Colossal Submissions)

Seoul, South Korea

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A Turbulent Black Sea Fills a Three-Story Wall in Kiev, Ukraine 

London-born and Cape Town-based artist Jake Aikman paints scenes that aim to capture the mysterious nature of environments at the edge of civilization, producing dramatic seascapes and dense patches of tropical forests in his oil paintings. His latest work moves from canvas to wall, upscaling his practice for the first time to produce a three-story tall mural of a stormy Black Sea. The two-layer public painting was produced for Art United Us over nine days last month in Kiev, Ukraine. You can see more of Aikman’s work on his Instagram and through SMAC Gallery where he is represented. (via Brooklyn Street Art)

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MIT Developed a Fabric That Can Fold Into Origami-Like Shapes When Inflated 

MIT Media Lab's Tangible Media Group has created a system to fold materials into various origami shapes when inflated, turning specifically designed paper, plastic, and fabric into representations of swans, helixes, or other 3D figures with minimal human interaction. The project, aeroMorph, utilizes special software to program the geometry needed for each three-dimensional shape and exports the information as digital fabrication files. After this, specific markings are heat-sealed onto the provided material on a large robotic platform, allowing it to bend at specific joints when filled with a steady stream of air.

The creators believe aeroMorph could be applied to future wearables, toys, robotics, and automated packaging. You can see the results from several of the project’s self-folding experiments in the video below. (via Laughing Squid)

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A Bamboo Recreation Facility Inspired by the Lotus Flower Blooms in Thailand 

The Panyaden International School is an education center located in Chiang Mai, Thailand built entirely from natural materials. Architecture firm Chiangmai Life recently designed a covered recreation hall for the school’s sports teams, creating a 2,500-square-foot bamboo terrace that echos the Buddhist values found in the school’s curriculum. The lotus-inspired structure was built without any steel reinforcements or other manmade materials, and stays naturally cool in the city’s humid climate while also withstanding high-speed winds and earthquakes. (via Inhabitat)

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