Text SFMOMA Your Favorite Emoji and Receive an Artwork From Their Vast Collection 

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art's newest tech tool allows any smartphone user to gain access to the artworks hidden behind their archive doors, a collection so large that it would stretch 121.3 miles if you placed each artwork end-to-end. With only 5% of this collection on view, the museum decided to create Send Me SFMOMA, a texting service that delivers an artwork to your phone based on a sent emoji or phrase. For example, the first emoji I decided to text was a goat, for which they return Takuma Nakahira's 2008 Untitled image of—you guessed it, a goat.

To participate, text the number 572-51 the words “send me” followed by either a keyword (such as a color, emotion, or type of art) or an emoji. A quick response will bring your phone an image of an artwork from SFMOMA’s vast collection, in addition to a caption containing the artist, artwork title, and year. Within the first four days of the program over 3,000 artworks were generated, a larger number than the amount of works currently on view.

The system isn’t perfect, more of my inquiries came back with an error message than an artwork, however the intrigue of seeing a piece that has been tucked away from the public is quite addicting. I especially loved seeing what some of my most used emojis resulted in, such as the single eye which brought Tomoko Sawada's Early Days (1996) to my inbox. (via Hyperallergic)

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Where Do Ideas Come From? A Short Film by Andrew Norton Tackles the Nature of Inspiration 

This new short film from filmmaker Andrew Norton tackles the nebulous origins of inspiration. Does a good idea strike like a bolt of lightning, or does it emerge from a soup of random ingredients cooked at just the right temperature? In a series of brief interviews with writers, artists, kids, and other creatives including the likes of Chuck Close and Susan Orlean, we get personal perspectives on where the best ideas originate. If you liked this, also check out Norton’s previous film: How to Age Gracefully. Where Do Ideas Come From? was presented by Transom with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

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Towering New Mixed Media Portraits by Andrew Salgado 

'Sunset (Good Morning Beautiful, I Waited All Night Long)' Oil, oil pastel, spray, and hand-dyed and hand stitched linen on Canvas, 245 x 215 cm

‘Sunset (Good Morning Beautiful, I Waited All Night Long)’ Oil, oil pastel, spray, and hand-dyed and hand stitched linen on Canvas, 245 x 215 cm

Canadian-born artist Andrew Salgado (previously here and here) presents a new body of work composed of towering portraits that span over eight-feet-tall. The mixed media works incorporate materials as diverse as paperback books and miniature cacti—objects that bring even more texture to the cross-hatched oil and pastel faces portrayed on each canvas. The works are included in his solo exhibition A Room With a View of the Ocean which runs through August 20 at Lauba House in Zagreb, Croatia. You can see more of Salgado’s mixed media works on his Facebook and Instagram.

(Detail) 'Soft Cage' Oil, oil pastel, paperback novels, and found objects on Canvas, 225 x 205 cm

(Detail) ‘Soft Cage’ Oil, oil pastel, paperback novels, and found objects on Canvas, 225 x 205 cm

'Soft Cage' Oil, oil pastel, paperback novels, and found objects on Canvas, 225 x 205 cm

‘Soft Cage’ Oil, oil pastel, paperback novels, and found objects on Canvas, 225 x 205 cm

'Ocean (Pretty Boys with Tears Like Grapes)' Oil, oil pastel, spray, collage, mixed-media and hand-dyed and hand stitched linen and paperback copies of The Outsider, A Season in Hell, and Tropic of Cancer on Canvas, 245 x 245 cm

‘Ocean (Pretty Boys with Tears Like Grapes)’ Oil, oil pastel, spray, collage, mixed-media and hand-dyed and hand stitched linen and paperback copies of The Outsider, A Season in Hell, and Tropic of Cancer on Canvas, 245 x 245 cm

'Seven Suns' Oil, oil pastel, spray, and hand-dyed and hand stitched linen, cacti, and paperback copy of The Outsider on Canvas, 245 x 215 cm

‘Seven Suns’ Oil, oil pastel, spray, and hand-dyed and hand stitched linen, cacti, and paperback copy of The Outsider on Canvas, 245 x 215 cm

(Detail) 'Seven Suns' Oil, oil pastel, spray, and hand-dyed and hand stitched linen, cacti, and paperback copy of The Outsider on Canvas, 245 x 215 cm

(Detail) ‘Seven Suns’ Oil, oil pastel, spray, and hand-dyed and hand stitched linen, cacti, and paperback copy of The Outsider on Canvas, 245 x 215 cm

'Morning (Bacchus in Chains)' Oil, oil pastel, collage, ceramic items, thread, wood, mixed media collage, Virgin Mary statues, found book, found objects, postcard, and ocean noises on paper and wallpaper, 106 x 106cm

‘Morning (Bacchus in Chains)’ Oil, oil pastel, collage, ceramic items, thread, wood, mixed media collage, Virgin Mary statues, found book, found objects, postcard, and ocean noises on paper and wallpaper, 106 x 106 cm

'Forever (Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow)' Oil, oil pastel, spray, collage, mixed-media and hand-dyed and hand stitched linen and paperback copy of Slaughterhouse V on Canvas, 245 x 235 cm

‘Forever (Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow)’ Oil, oil pastel, spray, collage, mixed-media and hand-dyed and hand stitched linen and paperback copy of Slaughterhouse V on Canvas, 245 x 235 cm

"A LESSON IN PATIENCE WE ARE THROW HEAD FIRST INTO HELL I CRY HIS FIGERS THRU A SMALL HOLE IN A BRICK WALL BRINGS ME BACK BUT I LEARNED ABOUT HIM ME THE DEPTHS OF MY SOUL AND MY STRENGTH IN THIS UNCATEGORIC JOURNEY A LONG WALK TOWARDS HELL” Oil, oil pastel, collage, plastic skulls, wood, collage, found collages and evil glances on paper and screenprint, 106 x 106 cm

“A LESSON IN PATIENCE WE ARE THROW HEAD FIRST INTO HELL I CRY HIS FIGERS THRU A SMALL HOLE IN A BRICK WALL BRINGS ME BACK BUT I LEARNED ABOUT HIM ME THE DEPTHS OF MY SOUL AND MY STRENGTH IN THIS UNCATEGORIC JOURNEY A LONG WALK TOWARDS HELL” Oil, oil pastel, collage, plastic skulls, wood, collage, found collages and evil glances on paper and screenprint, 106 x 106 cm

Install shot of 'A Room with a View of the Ocean'

Install shot of ‘A Room with a View of the Ocean’

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An Owl-Shaped Cabin Invites You to Sleep off the Grid in Bordeaux, France 

A cluster of three hollow wooden owls peer out from the end of a dock in Bordeaux, France, connected from within to form a two-story cabin. The Watchers was designed and built by Zebra3, a local contemporary art production company. The design was inspired by the small owls that nest on the ground in the surrounding marsh, with shingles to match their feathery heads.

“The idea of ​​birds came to me very quickly,” said Candice Petrillo, Zebra3’s key designer on the project. “After the last extension of the commercial zone, I saw migrants swirling around in the sky, looking for the old dried wetland. The nod of animal eye and the curve of the object are a tribute to the sculptors François Pompon and François-Xavier Lalanne.”

The structure is a part of a series of unique buildings scattered throughout the region, cabins that invite guests to spend the night for free in order to encourage hiking and exploration. The project, Les Refuges Périurbains is a collaboration between Zebra3 and Bruit du Frigo. You can see more of the area’s cabins on Les Refuges Périurbains’ website, including this lakeside home shaped like a cloud. (via Inhabitant)

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Twin Skulls Transform the Facade of this 19th Century French Castle 

Okuda San Miguel’s (previously) recently transformed 19th-century castle in Château, France is perhaps my favorite work by the artist to date. The intervention, titled Skull in the Mirror, covers the gigantic home’s facade in a mix of colorful polka dots, and is flanked on either side by two three-story skulls. Three dormer windows at the top of the castle are lined in bright red, blue, and orange, while the second story windows serve as openings for the prismatic skull’s four combined eyes.

After stints as a school and holiday center for children, the castle was abandoned for nearly 30 years.

Five years ago it was acquired by the local Town Hall. Recently it became a site for Urban Art Paris' LaBel Valette Festival, which hosted Okuda the last weekend in June. You can see a short video of the project, created by @chopemdownfilms, below.

A post shared by OKUDA SAN MIGUEL (@okudart) on

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