Human Skeletons Assembled with Found Coral by Gregory Halili 

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With parched white pieces of found sea coral, artist Gregory Halili has been creating skeletal parts of the human anatomy from hands and arms all the way up to a lifesize recreation of a human skeleton suspended atop a giant piece of driftwood. The irregular coral segments are uncanny stand-ins for human bones, and it’s no surprise the artist is able to identify anatomical details within sea life due to his previous work with skulls carved from mother of pearl. Halili was born in the Philippines in 1975 and spent his childhood surrounded by tropical wildlife and abundant regional flora and fauna that would go on to influence his artistic career in New Jersey. You can see more of his recent work on Artsy and at Nancy Hoffman Gallery.

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LEGO Designs a Vintage 1960’s Volkswagen Beetle Fully Prepped For a Day at the Beach 

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All images ©2016 LEGO Group

LEGO designers have developed a new flashback kit, an advanced model that replicates many of the iconic elements of a vintage 1960 Volkswagon Beetle. Built using 1,167 pieces, the bright blue replica has several operational features, including a pop-up hood and truck, flip-down seats, and a removable roof to peep the steering wheel and other accessories found inside.

Designers made sure not to leave out any detail, including a model of the original 4-cylinder air-cooled engine, fuel tank, rounded mudguards, interchangeable license plates, and tiny window decals. On the roof of the vehicle, LEGO also added a rack that fits a tiny surfboard and cooler containing ice and bottled drinks. In total, the new kit is 15 centimeters high, 29 centimeters long, and 12 centimeters wide. You can learn more about the details of the kit in the video below before it becomes available to the public on July 17. (via Designboom)

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A Glass Coffee Table Propelled by a Team of Rockets 

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Cypriot-based designer Stelios Mousarris conceived of this fun glass tabletop that blasts into the air aboard five wooden rockets. The designer was inspired by the nostalgia of his own childhood toy collection and he tried to embody the “retro” look with cartoon-like puffs of clouds at the base of each rocket. The table combines a variety of techniques from 3D printing to lathe work, and each rocket position is customizable. The piece is currently available for pre-order through his website. (via NOTCOT)

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A Giant Glass Raindrop Balances on a Bronze Man’s Face in Ukraine 

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All images via Nazar Bilyk

Ukrainian artist Nazar Bilyk created the 6-foot tall sculpture “Rain” as a symbol of man’s communication with nature, a dialogue between the human race and the world around us. The bronze sculpture features a nondescript man looking upward, a giant glass raindrop positioned over his face. This orb of translucent glass seems to balance perfectly, a sort of calm communing happening between the droplet and the solitary figure.

“The raindrop is a symbol of the dialogue which connects a man with a whole diversity of life forms,” Bilyk told My Modern Met. “The figure has a loose and porous structure and relates to dry land, which absorbs water. In this work I play with scale, making a raindrop large enough to compare a man with an insect, considering that man is a part of nature. Moreover, this work concerns the question of interaction and difficulties in coexistence of man with environment.”

You can see more of Bilyk’s work on his website and Behance. (via Bored Panda)

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“2001: A Space Odyssey” Viewed Through Picasso’s Dreams 

Photographer Bhautik Joshi has managed to make the film 2001: A Space Odyssey into something even more terrifying, turning the 1968 Sci-Fi hit into an animation fueled by Picasso. Joshi ran the film through Google’s neural network, Deep Dream, a program that finds and enhances patterns within images through algorithmic pareidolia. This process often leads to the hallucinogenic appearance of even simple images due to the extreme over-processing that occurs in the network.

Joshi took this program a couple of steps further by teaching the system to interpret the cult favorite as a series of Picasso paintings, making it lean more expressionist than trippy. If you like Joshi’s edit of the film, check out more of his work with DeepDream (including an interpretation of Blade Runner) on his Vimeo. (via Sploid)

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This 24-Hour Clock Gradually Transitions You From Dusk to Dawn 

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All images via Scott Thrift

Instead of being a slave to the numbers on your clock, designer Scott Thrift would like you to have a more peaceful relationship to your timepiece, one that revolves around gradients and soothing colors rather than numerals. Today, his newest design, is a 24-hour timepiece that moves at half the speed of a typical clock, and operates on times of the day rather than numeric classifications. The subtle blues and purples that make up the clock’s gradient break down the day into dawn, noon, dusk, and midnight, allowing for a gradual transition rather than one that evokes stress by watching numbers tick by.

You can preorder Today on Thrift’s Kickstarter, or visit his previous clock design The Present on his website. (via My Modern Met)

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