The Incredible Sand Sculptures of Toshihiko Hosaka 

Toshihiko Hosaka began making sand sculptures in art school and has been using beaches and sand boxes as his canvas for almost 20 years. His work defies what we typically think of as sand art as he sculpts and carves the loose, granular substance as if it were some malleable form of clay.

There is no core, mold or adhesive ever used throughout the process: just sand. The only trick Hosaka uses (and this is commonly accepted) is a hardening spray applied to his sculpture only after it’s been completed, in order to prevent wind and sun from eroding it for a few days.

Earlier this month Hosaka competed in the Fulong International Sand Sculpture Art Festival along with 22 other international professional sand sculptors. The theme for the contest was “Hero” and Hosaka spent 3 days sculpting a figure of Musashi Miyamoto, which was awarded 1st prize on May 6th. Hosaka depicted the 16th century expert Japanese swordsman seated down in a calm position, sword tucked under his belt.

The artist continues to be active in and around Japan. According to an interview, he’ll be at the Sakaide Minato Matsuri on May 18th creating a salt sculpture (which will go on view on the 27th). Then on July 15th he’ll be at the Ishikarihama Sand Park. He’s also available for group workshops where he’ll teach you everything there is to know about sand sculpting.

In the ultimate display of pursuing perfection, Hosaka even collaborated with a Japanese chemical company to create his own environmentally friendly Sand Art Glue, that substance he uses to spray on his sculptures once they’re complete. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

“Musashi Miyamoto” received 1st prize at the Fulong International Sand Sculpture Art Festival.

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Crocheted Lace Jewelry Inspired by Organic Specimens 

Japanese artist Miho Fujita crochets delicate sculptures of organic matter found in forests, turning handmade leaves, berries, and clusters of mushrooms into wearable objects. The works are all created from naturally dyed cotton, Fujita using plants to both inspire and dye her jewelry. You can see more of her crocheted works on her FacebookInstagram, and online store. (via Lustik)

    

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Photographer and Adobe Stock Contributor Tasha Van Zandt Documents Her Travels Around the World 

Having traveled to over 75 countries with camera in-hand, photographer and Adobe Stock Contributor Tasha Van Zandt is on a quest to discover how interconnected the world truly is through her documentary films, photography, and an insightful style of visual storytelling. Among her chief concerns is to connect people to the importance of climate change, the effects of which she has experienced first-hand in recent travels to the islands of Mo’orea and Tahiti in French Polynesia. By extension, Van Zandt offers her stunning photography through Adobe Stock, allowing others to use photographs she’s already taken to tell stories of their own.

“As I move forward in my work and travels I hope that my photographs and films can act as a passport and help viewers to better see just how interconnected we all truly are,” Van Zandt shares. “One of my current goals in my work is to get more photographs of social and environmental issues directly into the hands of policy and change makers. I think so often the opposition to correcting these issues stems from lack of personal connection so I strongly believe that the more we can create a personal connection in our work the more we can inspire change.”

Though social change and climate awareness is at the core of Van Zandt’s work, her keen eye captures the undeniable beauty and mystique of every location she visits around the world, images which you can now find on Adobe Stock. Adobe Stock is seamlessly integrated into Creative Cloud applications, so you can search, view, edit, and license photographs, videos, illustrations, vector graphics, 3D assets and more without leaving your creative workflow. Monthly subscription plans are available for individuals, small teams, and enterprise solutions. Learn more about plans and pricing on Adobe Stock. If you’re interested in selling your own stock photos and videos, visit the Adobe Contributor Portal.

Tasha Van Zandt

When TV Logos Were Physical Objects 

It goes without saying that nearly everything made with graphic design and video software was once produced using a physical process, from newspapers to TV Logos. But some TV stations and film studios took things even further and designed physical logos that were filmed to create dynamic special effects. Arguably the most famous of which is MGM’s Leo the Lion which first appeared in 1916 and would go on to include 7 different lions over the decades.

Recently, television history buff Andrew Wiseman unearthed this amazing behind-the-scenes shot of the Office de Radiodiffusion Télévision Française logo from the early 1960s that was constructed with an array of strings to provide the identity with a bright shimmer that couldn’t be accomplished with 2D drawings. The logo could also presumably be filmed from different perspectives, though there’s no evidence that was actually done.

Another famous physical TV identity was the BBC’s “globe and mirror” logo in use from 1981 to 1985 that was based on a physical device. After filming the rotating globe against a panoramic mirror, it appears the results were then traced by hand similar to rotoscoping. One of the more elaborate physical TV intro sequences was the 1983 HBO intro that despite giving the impression of being animated or created digitally was in fact built almost entirely with practical effects. You can watch a 10 minute video about how they did it below. (via Quipsologies, Reddit, Andrew Wiseman)

Update: It turns out the BBC Globe ident wasn’t rotoscoped or animated, instead it was recorded live using the Noddy camera system and the color was created by adjusting the contrast. Thanks, Gene!

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Shoe-Shi: Edible Sneakers That Combine an Artist’s Love of Footwear and Sushi 

Milan-based Yujia Hu is an artist and chef who really likes to play with his food. The 28-year-old’s newest invention is “shoe shi,” sneakers and other types of footwear crafted from rice, seaweed, and raw fish. The miniature kicks are mostly sneakers, but also include a few pairs of slip on sandals, and are each 100% edible. Every shoe takes Hu about 30 minutes to produce, and often finalizes the work by adding the logo of a recognisable brand such as Nike, Adidas, or Supreme. You can see more of his edible edible shoes on his Instagram and Facebook. (via deMilked)

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Unsatisfying GIFs That Transform Frustrating IRL Moments into Digital Animations 

Paris-based motion design studio Parallel created a series of short animations which aim to do anything but impress, clips that highlight the frustrating day-to-day mishaps by turning them digital. The series, titled UNSATISFYING, aims to go against the trend of oddly satisfying videos that are currently pervading the internet, instead making audiences cringe with scenes that only deliver disappointment. The well-designed clips of missed opportunities and jammed soda cans were warmly accepted, and have led to several other animators creating their own takes of annoying moments through the studio’s UNSATISFYING Challenge. Take a look at eight short GIFs made from the original UNSATISFYING video below. (via The Creators Project)

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