Geometric Portraits Constructed with Reclaimed Wood by ‘Strook’ 

Working with recycled wood doors and paneling pulled from old houses, Belgian artist Stefaan De Croock aka Strook (previously) constructs both large and small-scale geometric portraits. Each piece is designed individually using multiple fragments of cut wood which he mixes and matches to form a sort of color palette. He also creates similar works on canvas.

Strook’s most recent piece was an enormous wooden assemblage for the Crystal Ship, a new art festival in Ostend, Belgium now in its second year. You can see more of his recent work on Instagram. (via Arrested Motion)

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People I Saw But Never Met: Thousands of Miniature Metal Figurines by Zadok Ben-David 

“People I Saw But Never Met,” 2017, detail. Courtesy Shoshana Wayne Gallery.

Taking notice of the countless people we witness as a backdrop to our daily lives seems like an impossible task, but for artist Zadok Ben-David (previously) this myriad of anonymous people form the basis of his installation People I Saw But Never Met. Comprised of over 3,000 chemically etched miniature figures displayed at varying proportions, each individual is pulled from photographs taken by Ben-David during his travels across Europe, the United States, Central Asia, Australia, and Antarctica, creating a diverse assemblage of various cultures and people.

Shown individually, the two-dimensional sketch-like sculptures seem to depict the mundane moments in the lives of average citizens, tourists, and even pets, but viewed collectively the installation offers a unique snapshot of humanity at a certain moment in time. “Ben-David’s sculptural milieu comes at a critical point in our current socio-political climate,” says Shoshana Wayne Gallery, “where heated debates about exclusion and borders versus inclusivity and multiplicity are part of our daily experience.”

People I Saw But Never Met has been installed in various configurations since 2015 and is currently on view at Shoshana Wayne Gallery in Santa Monica through May 27, 2017. This new installation incorporates thousands of smaller figures along with 45 much larger hand-cut aluminum figures installed in a large gallery space. You can see more views here. (via Design Milk)

“People I Saw But Never Met,” 2017. Courtesy Shoshana Wayne Gallery.

“People I Saw But Never Met,” 2015, detail.

“People I Saw But Never Met,” 2015, detail.

“People I Saw But Never Met,” 2017, detail. Courtesy Shoshana Wayne Gallery.

“People I Saw But Never Met,” 2017, detail. Courtesy Shoshana Wayne Gallery.

“People I Saw But Never Met,” 2017, detail. Courtesy Shoshana Wayne Gallery.

“People I Saw But Never Met,” 2017, detail. Courtesy Shoshana Wayne Gallery.

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Prismatic Portraits by Lui Ferreyra Form a Collision of Geometry and Color 

Denver-based artist Lui Ferreyra (previously) has spent the last decade honing a technique that portrays faces, hands, and landscapes as dense fields of geometric color. While evoking a tone that clearly references the digital age, Ferreyra also draws inspiration from artists like Chuck Close and Egon Schiele who famously worked with aspects of pointillism and geometry. Seen here are a collection of drawings and sketches, but he utilizes a similar fragmentary style for oil paintings as well. You can follow Ferreyra on Instagram and see more of his work at William Havu Gallery.

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Moody Views of a Frigid Chicago Captured by Mike Meyers 

Chicago photographer Mike Meyers shot some amazing views of the windy city this winter, capturing unusual ice patterns on Lake Michigan, trains blasting through snow, and skyscrapers swallowed by clouds. Meyers shares more of his cityscape photography on his website and also sells a number of photos as prints. (via ARCHatlas)

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Repurposed Antique Dishware Sandblasted Into Bas-Relief Sculptures by Caroline Slotte 

From the series Tracing, 2015. Reworked second hand ceramics. Ø 24 cm Collection West Norway Museum of Decorative Art, Bergen (N)

Trying to imagine the original state of these rough-edged antique plates is part of the intention behind these sculptures by Helskini-based artist Caroline Slotte (previously), whose artworks often involve aspects of memory and the physical reduction of objects while still retaining the original meaning. For her 2015 series Tracing, Slotte reworked several ceramic plates utilizing a complex sequence of masking and sandblasting to transform painted 2D images into textural 3D reliefs. She explains in an interview with the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft:

In [the] Tracing Series, I used a process of repeated masking and sandblasting to remove the glaze and the printed imagery step-by-step. When sandblasting the sand eats away on everything hard. Anything soft and flexible, such as the glue I use for masking, remains, the sand cannot penetrate it. I work my way down, layer by layer, rendering the motif three-dimensional, until the image is transformed into something resembling an imprint or an X-ray, as though a memory of the image had sunk into the plate.

Through each artwork Slotte references not only the history of an image applied to a plate, but also the second-hand object itself, while creating something entirely new. You can see more of her work at Ferrin Contemporary.

From the series Tracing, 2015. Reworked second hand ceramics. Ø 22 cm

From the series Tracing, 2015. Reworked second hand ceramics. Ø 27 cm

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Amazing Terrarium and Flower Cakes Created by Iven Kawi 

Jakarta-based pastry chef Iven Kawi says she made her first honest attempt at baking in December of 2013 when she made a batch of Christmas cookies for her daughter’s school. As you can see, things have progressed quite a bit. Kawi now runs a bakery shop out of her home in Lippo Karawaci called Iven Oven where she creates elaborately decorated baked goods. Among her specialties are cakes adorned with terrarium environments where buttercream frosting is sculpted into an abundance of cacti and flower petals atop beds of crumbly sand or dirt. You can follow more of her work on Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

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