Art Illustration

Graphite Illustrations That Explore the Detailed Relationships of the Natural World by Zoe Keller

October 6, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Zoe Keller creates detailed illustrations pulled from the natural world. Her fauna-based drawings are done completely in charcoal, drawing the eye to the subtle markings used to create either fur or scales. Source imagery for the works comes from nature and how it becomes mediated in books and field guides, however Keller often fills in areas of question with pieces pulled from her own inquisitions or memory.

“My curiosity about the natural world is what keeps me dialed in to my work,” Keller told Colossal. “Drawing is the best way that I’ve found to understand how organisms and ecosystems work. In order to draw something realistically you have to understand how it sits in space, how it moves, the mechanics of its insides. So for me tuning into the natural world means chasing an endless series of questions. On the most minute, piece-specific scale, this can mean asking how many whorls are in the shell of a particular species of snail. On a larger scale, I’ve been developing bodies of work that ask big questions about visually engaging with the natural world in ways that honor it and inspire others to protect it.”

Often the Portland-based artist’s subjects are related in a way that might not be known to the common viewer. This can range from a drawing of plants that are endangered in Oregon to a work concentrated on flowers that can only be found in a particular part of the US. This strategy allows a deeper research to go into her practice so that the final image is not just about aesthetics, but relates to a more immediate concern for the natural world.

Keller recently participated in a week-long backpacking artist residency called Signal Fire in the Klamath National Forest which was one of many inspirations for her upcoming solo exhibition Swarm, opening October 27 at Light Grey Art Lab in Minneapolis. You can peek further into Keller’s practice on her Instagram and Facebook. (via Hi-Fructose) 

 

 

 



Design

Twenty-One Colorful Cubes Compose Denmark’s Newly Opened Lego House

October 5, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

After four years of construction, Denmark’s colorful LEGO House has finally been unveiled to the public in the company’s native land of Billund. The building, designed by the Copenhagen and New York-based design firm Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), is composed of 21 large, white cubes which each contain a colorfully painted roof. This “stack” is topped by an oversized LEGO brick, an oblong keystone which contains eight skylights that peer into the building below.

The structure is color-coded to correspond to four experience sections which encourage visitors to explore their creativity in different aspects of learning and play. The red section is for creative skills, blue utilizes cognitive abilities, green engages social interaction, and yellow contains activities aimed at emotion. In addition to these zones there are also three restaurants, a store, a 6,500 square foot public square, and two exhibition areas that display creations built by fans and works that explore the history of LEGO.

You can explore more images of the new interactive center on its website. (via Designboom)

 

 



Craft Design

Miniature Paper Plants by Raya Sader Bujana

October 5, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Paper artist Raya Sader Bujana (previously) has been producing a new series of tiny paper flowers and cacti encased by miniature glass terrariums, each measuring only 4cm high. You can see more on Instagram and a few are available in her Etsy Shop.

 

 



Art Design Photography

Pass Seamlessly Through the Walls of an Abandoned Building in this Photographic 3D Reconstruction by Oddviz

October 5, 2017

Christopher Jobson

El Orfelinato is the latest experimental visualization from digital artist Erdal Inci (previously) as part of an artist collective he co-founded called Oddviz with Çağrı Taşkın and Serkan Kaptan. The video piece captures an abandoned Jewish orphanage building in Ortaköy, Istanbul, through thousands of photos and 3D scans and then reconstructs it digitally, allowing the viewer to pass digitally through the walls while seeing a complete photographic representation of the building. The piece is a follow-up to a similar work from a few months ago titled Hotel.

 

 



Photography

New Feathery Portraits That Peek Inside the Personalities of Cockatoos and Doves

October 4, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Superb Fruit Dove

Superb Fruit Dove

Photographer Leila Jeffreys (previously) captures birds outside of their traditional context, taking various breeds into her studio to photograph without distraction. The simple portraits capture the elegance of each bird, bringing a new perspective to the brilliant colors and textures that belong to each cockatoo, dove, or other domestic or exotic species. The works appear as both an unbiased attempts at documenting a set of animals, and a warm depiction of the feathery subjects. Each gives a peek into the personality of the bird on view, with a few casting solemn expressions, and one cockatoo showcasing what appears to be a wry smile.

Jeffreys has an upcoming exhibition of her portraits titled Ornithurae Volume 1 at Olsen Gruin Gallery in New York City on October 13. The exhibition will run through November 12, 2017. You can see more of her photographs on her website and Instagram.

Cyril Moluccan Cockatoo

Cyril Moluccan Cockatoo

Emerald Dove

Emerald Dove

New Guinea Ground Dove

New Guinea Ground Dove

Skye Red-Tailed Black Cockatoo

Skye Red-Tailed Black Cockatoo

 

 



Art

The Crystalline Busts of Massimiliano Pelletti

October 4, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Crystal Venus, 2017. Mexican onyx madre cava. 72 x 75 x 38 cm

Italian artist Massimiliano Pelletti works within a variety of materials including marble, bronze, and stone to carve elegant busts and human forms that evoke echoes of ancient sculpture while infusing each piece with a contemporary twist. Among his more intriguing works are figures carved from white onyx, where the rough crystalline edges are left largely intact as a juxtaposition to smoothly carved faces. Embracing the imperfect elements of his chosen mediums appears to be one of Peletti’s hallmarks, as he often accentuates or even highlights cracks or breaks in the rock.

Peletti lives and works in Pietrasanta, Italy where he attended the Stagio Stagi Art School. You can follow more of his work on Instagram and Artsy. (via Visual Fodder)

Crystal Dea, 2017. Mexican onyx madre cava. 90 x 40 x 60 cm

Crystal Boy, 2106. White Onyx. 45 x 40 x 60h cm

Crystal Venus, 2016. White Onyx. 56x40x61h cm

 

 



Design

Preserve Botanical Finds and Other Travel Specimens With This Unique Japanese Stationery

October 4, 2017

Johnny Strategy

Did you go anywhere fun and inspiring this summer? Did you wish you could share a piece of the experience with someone? Well now you can with this one-of-a kind mailing card that comes with a specimen window.

Share a piece of your travels—a leaf, a newspaper clipping, a flower petal, a tag, a ticket—by inserting the specimen between the plastic sheets to hold it in place. Add some text and your card transforms into a tiny museum dedicated to telling a story from your travels.

The card was designed by Tokyo-based illustrator Haruka Shinji, who knows a thing or two about traveling. She grew up in Seoul and Shanghai before moving to London for college. After graduating from Royal College of Art she moved back to Tokyo. Her idea for the card won an award in a paper card design competition, and was then produced by the Tokyo-based Fukunaga Print.

You can find the Preserve Your Travel Card in the Spoon & Tamago shop. (Synidcated from Spoon & Tamago)

 

 

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