Ghostly Watercolor and Ink Cats Bleeding into the Canvas

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Serbian artist Endre Penovác renders fluffy felines with stark black watercolors and ink. Penovác heavily dilutes the pigments with water creating small rivers and splotches that perfectly mimic the texture of fur. You can see more of these on his website and over on Miss Moss.

Update: Penovác has prints and originals available through Saatchi Art.

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A Perpetual Whirlpool of Black Water Installed in a Gallery Floor by Anish Kapoor

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Anish Kapoor. “Descension” (2014) ©Anish Kapoor 2015

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via webindia123.com

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“If one is talking about sculpture then scale and skin is everything,” declared Anish Kapoor. He was speaking from India, the birthplace of the acclaimed sculptor, where his latest installation was part of the Kochi-Muziris Biennale. The skin of the object is what defines it, he goes on to explain, while scale creates a certain mystery around the object. Kapoor’s latest work, Descension, has both of these elements.

Unexpectedly set into the gallery floor is a large, seemingly endless hole. In it, a vortex of black water perpetually froths and churns. The whirlpool alters the form, or skin, of the water creating a fury of liquid that invades the walls of the gallery. Descension was on view in a corner room at the Aspinwall House in Fort Kochi, a meaningful location because the room opens to views of a peaceful sea that creates a striking contrast to the powerful whirling vortex. (via Designboom)

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A New Artificial Skylight System Nearly Indistinguishable from the Sun Itself

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In what may be one of the most ground-breaking developments in creating artificial sunlight, a group of Italian scientists recently announced CoeLux, a new kind of skylight that perfectly mimics the feel of daylight. The creator’s claim the system is so effective that it tricks unknowing individuals into thinking they are looking up at the actual sun.

The inventors are somewhat tight-lipped about how CoeLux works, but it involves filtering a light source through a layer of nanoparticles that mimic Earth’s atmosphere. Because of this, not only does the color match sunshine but the quality does as well. In the photos above—which CoeLux insists aren’t digitally altered—you can get an idea of how realistic the light is, and see it in action in the video.

The light is currently available in three different configurations that mimic sunlight at different points on the globe including tropical, mediterranean, and nordic environments. Applications for CoeLux might involve anywhere light is scarce, from extreme environments like scientific outposts to underground parking garages or even in hospitals. You can see more on their website. (via PetaPixel)

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New Photographs of Crashing Ocean Waves Frozen in Time by Pierre Carreau

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Fascinated by the mysteries of the ocean his entire life, photographer Pierre Carreau (previously) documents the power and serenity of ocean waves in his now decade-long project AquaViva. After obtaining a business degree and going into IT, Carreau dramatically changed course in 2004 and moved with his family to the Caribbean island of St. Barthélemy where he now photographs waves as an artistic pursuit.

Carreau’s high-speed photos capture waves that appear frozen in time, giving them an almost sculptural appearance. “Water is amazing,” Carreau says. “Basically it has no color, but through reflection and refraction it can possess all of them, the entire spectrum of light.” More from his statement about AquaViva:

Carreau observes that the photographic images of AquaViva may sometimes be perceived as objects rather than as two-dimensional representations. The play of light off the multitude of facets and curves on the water’s surface gives the image a sculptural quality that enhances the sense of stillness and power. This simultaneous depiction of roiling movement and suspended kinetic energy parallels the dual nature of the oceans and of water itself: life-giving and yet dangerous, inviting and yet fearsome, primordial and yet ever-changing and always renewed.

Seen here is a collection of new photos from 2014 mixed with a few earlier shots we had yet to feature on Colossal, and there’s plenty more to see.

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French Artist ‘Levalet’ Injects Humor into the Streets of Paris with New Site-Specific Street Art

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A bronze bull head fountain is suddenly transformed into a minotaur. A decrepit corner of an alley becomes a holding pen for ostriches. If any of these odd happenings sound familiar to you, you’re probably living in Paris and have just witnessed the work of French artist Charles Leval (previously). Going by the name Levalet, the artist injects humor into the streets of Paris by gluing animal and human-shaped pasteups onto walls. A lot of thought goes into location too as each piece usually interacts with its environment in one way or another.

Levalet has been updating his site and facebook page with new work he’s created so far in 2015. When not on the streets, Levalet can be found in a classroom (he teaches art) and in a gallery (he held an exhibition late last year at Galerie Geraldine Zberro). “I was looking for places and contexts to operate,” says Levalet, referring to his prime medium: the wall. “The street became a creative space I had to invade.” (via StreetArtNews)

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Sponsor // A’ Design Awards 2015 — International Call for Entries

The A’ Design Award & Competition is the world’s leading international annual juried competition for design. The A’ Design Accolades are organized in a wide range of creative fields to highlight the very best designers from all countries in all disciplines. Entries to the competition are peer-reviewed and anonymously judged by an influential jury panel of experienced academics, prominent press members and established professionals.

The A’ Design Prize, given to award winners, includes PR, publicity, and marketing services, in addition to an exclusive invitation to the glamorous Gala-Night and Award Ceremony at Como Lake, Italy, where award winners are presented their exclusive trophies, hardcover yearbook of best designs, and certificates.

Submit your work at adesignaward.com/registration.

Deadline for entries to the A’ Design Award & Competition is on February 28, 2015. Results will be announced on April 15, 2015.

An Impressive Piet Mondrian Painted with Stop-Motion Lego by Jon Rolph

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Watch as Lego enthusiast Jon Rolph deftly recreates a Piet Mondrian using stop-motion animation. While it may seem like a pretty straightforward idea, the attention to detail here is astounding, even PES was impressed. (via Stellar)

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