Short Edition: A Short Story Vending Machine that Prints Free Stories On-Demand 

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Need to kill a few minutes while waiting for a bus or train? Instead of mindlessly staring at your phone or twiddling your thumbs, why not print out a quick short story. A small start-up in Grenoble, France aims to do just that with the Short Edition vending machine. The machines were conceived by Short Edition co-founder Christophe Sibieude who was standing in front of a traditional candy vending machine and questioned if there might be a better way to pass the time other than snacking.

So far, eight of the minimalistic vending machines have been installed around the city, each of which has three buttons that correlate with how much reading time you have to spare: 1, 3, or 5 minutes. The stories print instantly on narrow receipt paper which makes for easy reading and storage. The randomly printed stories are written by the Short Edition community, and also include poems and other forms of experimental short fiction.

If you liked this, also check out the Biblio-Mat. (via Hyperallergic)

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Li-Hill’s Large-Scale Murals Resemble Ghostly Projections of Angels, Birds, and Foxes 

hill01Rise And Fall | Aerosol on Concrete, approx: 62’x62′, Berlin, 2015. Photo by Sabine Winge via Street Art Germany

In his towering public murals, Canadian visual artist Li-Hill paints ghostly depictions of angels, fencers, and animals with a sweeping sense of motion and energy. The works’ transparent strokes seem to be frozen in mid-air, the lightness emanating from the works causing the murals to appear more like projections than painted figures.

In his large-scale pieces Li-Hill merges graffiti, graphic design, painting, and drawing to create complex images, often revealing an unsettling nature within his paused narratives. Li-Hill hopes to represent the effects that capitalist culture can have on the individual, and in his artist statement he explains “the work mirrors the perception of the westerner attempting to comprehend, disentangle and redress. Born out of suppression, it becomes a manifestation portraying the skewed image of the imprint our culture has globally.”

The Brooklyn-based artist studied Fine Arts at OCAD University in Toronto, Ontario and has had works shown in several national institutions such as the National Gallery of Victoria, The Art Gallery of Ontario and the Portsmouth Museum of Art in New Hampshire. You can see more of Li-Hill’s ghostly murals in the new book Mural XXL by Thames & Hudson, and on his Instagram here.

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Casting Shadows | Aerosol on Brick, approx. 9’x8′, Brooklyn, 2015

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Fox | Aerosol + Latex on Wood, approx: 14’x9′, Toronto, 2014

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Nothing Wild 2 | Aerosol + Latex on Brick, approx. 10’x32′, Brooklyn, 2015

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Nothing Wild 1 | Aerosol + Latex on Brick, approx. 10’x32′, Brooklyn, 2015

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Rise & Fall

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Deacon Of Dark River | Aerosol + Latex on Plaster, approx. 26’x39′, Reykavijk, 2015

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Across the Sky: A Record-Breaking 500 Meter Slackline Walk in Utah 

It’s not often we stop to consider feats of human strength and agility, but this is definitely worth an exception. On November 15, Théo Sanson completed what is likely a new world record for slackline, a 500-meter walk between The Rectory to Castleton Tower in Castle Valley, Utah. The cinematography does a fantastic job of capturing just how ridiculously far he had to walk. Filmed and Edited by Tim Kemple, Renan Ozturk and Anson Fogel of Camp4 Collective. Madness. (via Devour)

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Artwork is Work, Supporting the Arts Means Paying the Artists 

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Photo by Scott Beale for Laughing Squid

Scott Beale over at Laughing Squid spotted this great bumper sticker the other day while traveling through Ohio. This is probably the first time we’ve stopped to appreciate a bumper sticker on Colossal, but the message is definitely an important one these days. Pick one up through Northern Sun for just $2.50. (via Laughing Squid)

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Faig Ahmed Creates Glitched-Out Contemporary Rugs from Traditional Azerbaijani Textiles 

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Faig Ahmed distorts the patterns of traditional Azerbaijani rugs, dismantling their structure in order to build compositions that trick the eye by appearing to melt off the wall. By rearticulating the original design, he creates contemporary sculptural forms that look like digital glitches, patterns flatlining halfway through a tapestry or gradually morphing into a digital mosaic.

Ahmed explains that his fascination for textiles stems from their historical value, humanity utilizing fabric for nearly the entire length of human history. “Another thing that interests me is pattern,” says Ahmed. “Patterns and ornaments can be found in all cultures, sometimes similar, sometimes very different. I consider them words and phrases that can be read and translated to a language we understand.”

Ahmed lives and works in Baku, Azerbaijan and graduated from the sculpture department of Azerbaijan State Academy of Fine Art in 2004. The artist previously focused on painting, video, and installation, but now currently focuses on textile and sculpture. Ahmed recently had a solo exhibition with Italian gallery Montoro12 titled “Omnia Mutantur, Nihil Interit,” and is currently in the group exhibition “Crafted: Objects in Flux” at The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston until January 10, 2016. (via Booooooom)

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The Smithsonian’s ‘Wonder’ Exhibition Fills a Newly Renovated Gallery Floor-to-Ceiling with Artworks 

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Gabriel Dawe, “Plexus A1” (2015)

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Patrick Dougherty, “Shindig” (2015)

WONDER, the first exhibition at the Renwick Gallery at the Smithsonian American Art Museum since its two-year renovation, brings together nine contemporary artists that each created room-sized installations inspired by the building in which they were produced. Jennifer Angus, Chakaia Booker, Gabriel Dawe, Tara Donovan, Patrick Dougherty, Janet Echelman, John Grade, Maya Lin, and Leo Villareal each work with objects that are often considered mundane, producing large-scale works from everyday objects like toothpicks and hoards of marbles. Each work in the exhibition demonstrates the labor that went into each piece, normalized elements that have been transformed into mind-bending arrangements.

John Grade created a plaster cast of a tree the same age as the Renwick building, rebuilding the tree’s form from 500,000 segments of reclaimed cedar. Tara Donovan also utilized wood in the form of toothpicks to build her mountainous works, building her towering heaps with other trash like straws and Styrofoam cups to prompt the audience to reexamine the daily detritus seen on city streets.

Other works like Gabriel Dawe’s “Plexus A1” and Janet Echelman’s “1.8” are much more colorful, Dawe’s rainbow weaving mistaken for a prismatic stream of light and Echelman’s red and orange sculptural waves brightly expressing the energetic power of one of the most devastating earthquakes in recorded history.

The Renwick Gallery was the very first building in the United States to be built specifically for the purpose of housing an art museum. You can see how WONDER transformed its newly renovated galleries through mid-2016, with a closing on July 10. (via Art Ruby)

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Tara Donovan, “Untitled” detail (2014)

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Tara Donovan, “Untitled” (2014)

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Leo Villareal, “Volume (Renwick)” (2015)

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Maya Lin, “Folding the Chesapeake” (2015)

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Chakaia Booker, “ANONYMOUS DONOR” (2015)

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Jennifer Angus, “In the Midnight Garden” (2015)

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Janet Echelman, “1.8” (2015)

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Janet Echelman, “1.8” detail (2015)

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John Grade, “Middle Fork” (2015), all images by Ron Blunt

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John Grade, “Middle Fork” detail (2015)

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