Skeletal Leaf Bowl Sculptures by Kay Sekimachi 

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While attending school at the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland, artist Kay Sekimachi was struck by a quote from her teacher Trude Guermon-prez: “Try to make something with the simplest of means.” Over the span of her sixty-year art career Sekimachi took the words to heart as she rose to the forefront of contemporary fiber art in the 60s and 70s by creating challenging artworks with extremely limited means. Leaves, hornet’s nest paper, grass, shells, and linen constitute many of the materials in Sekimachi’s repertoire. Via the Smithsonian:

Sekimachi uses the loom to construct three-dimensional sculptural forms. In the early 1970s she used nylon monofilament to create hanging quadruple tubular woven forms to explore ideas of space, transparency, and movement. Inspired by her ancestral homeland of Japan, Sekimachi repeatedly returns to that ancient culture for ideas.

Among her more recent works are these delicate bowls made from maple leaf skeletons. The pieces are held together with the help of Kozo paper and special coatings of both watercolor and Krylon. Several of the works will be on view at the Bellevue Arts Museum starting July 3, along with an exhibition of work by her late husband, renowned America woodturner Bob Stocksdale. (via My Modern Met)

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Beautiful Abstract Bird Plumage Photographs by Thomas Lohr 

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Photographer Thomas Lohr is known mostly for his high-profile fashion shoots for clients like Vogue, Le Monde d’Hermès, and i-D, but somewhere in his grueling shooting schedule he still finds time for personal projects, the most recent of which is a collection of bird plumage photos gathered into a limited edition book titled Birds. Lohr wanted to take a slightly different approach with the project and instead of capturing the animals in their entirety, he decided to focus on what intrigued him the most: the color, texture, and form of their feathers.

The abstract photos of wings, bellies, and other near unrecognizable parts of each bird are accompanied by each species scientific name like “Anodorhynchus Hyacinthinus” or “Geronticus Eremita,” creating yet another unfamiliar layer of abstraction. You can take a peek inside the book on Lohr’s website, and read an interview over on AnOther. (via AnOther, This Isn’t Happiness)

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Analogue Experiments with Gravity Filmed by Clemens Wirth 

Austrian director and visual artist Clemens Wirth created this gorgeous visual feast of gravitational experiments called Gravity. With the exception of a segment depicting digital black fabric, all the visuals were made with practical effects inside a special rig that can be rotated 360° with or without the camera. Wirth says he found inspiration both from the film Inception, and a similar project from a few years ago by Feedme Design. (via swissmiss, Vimeo Staff Picks)

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A Variety of Unprocessed Foods Cut into Uncannily Precise 2.5cm Cubes by Lernert & Sander 

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In 2014, Dutch newspaper De Volkskrant contacted conceptual design studio Lernert & Sander to create a piece for a special documentary photography issue about food. Lernert & Sander responded with this somewhat miraculous photo of 98 unprocessed foods cut into extremely precise 2.5cm cubes aligned on a staggered grid. Looking at the shot it seems practically impossible, but the studio confirms it is indeed the real thing. The photo is available as a limited edition print of 50 copies printed on 40 x 50cm baryta paper signed by the artists for about €500. You can learn more on their website. (via iGNANT)

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Lola Dupré’s Fragmented Photograph Collages Appear as Funhouse Mirror Reflections 

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Heavily influenced by the Dada aesthetic, Lola Dupré’s surreal collages bend and expand the traditional view of both object and human form. With a wide focus of subject matter it seems as if no human or animal can escape Dupré’s focus, her subjects ranging from famous presidents and celebrities to giraffes and hound dogs.

Each work includes some sort of distortion to the original image, either by the artist multiplying limbs or elongating torsos and faces into unnatural poses. Although the work appears digitally manipulated, the collage artist and illustrator uses paper and scissors as her medium, utilizing thousands of paper paper shards to produce her funhouse-like imagery.

Since 2000 Dupré has lived and worked in multiple countries, creating her detailed collages in countries such as Scotland, Switzerland, France, Portugal, and Spain. Currently the artist is located in Limerick, Ireland and is represented by Los Angeles-based CES Gallery. More of Dupré’s eerie work can be found on her Tumblr and Facebook page.

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Panoramic Coffee Cup Sketches by Adrian Hogan 

A video posted by Adrian Hogan (@adehogan) on


Tokyo-based illustrator Adrian Hogan created a fun series of sketches last April where he drew panoramic views of streets and sidewalks around the outside of his coffee cups. In these brief videos he then slowly reveals each drawing against the backdrop of its subject. (via MAS Context)

A video posted by Adrian Hogan (@adehogan) on

A video posted by Adrian Hogan (@adehogan) on

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