Art Design

Elaborate Hand-Cranked Automata by Dave Hall

June 21, 2016

Christopher Jobson

The mechanics for creating a basic hand-cranked toy automata aren’t particularly complex. A few pieces of wood, a crank, and a some bent wires and it’s possible to produce some basic movements. However designer Dave Hall takes things to an entirely different level with his ludicrously complex contraptions that move dozens of interconnected parts with the help of a single crank. His latest piece depicts a man riding a quirky kangaroo accompanied by a trusty cat clutching a fish surrounded by numerous birds and flowers. Hall works out of his house and claims to not even have a studio or work with special tools with the exception of a dremel. You can see more of his automata creations on his website. (via Hi-Fructose)

 

 



Art

Shattered Porcelain Fragments Fused With Gold by Artist Yeesookyung

June 21, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

Translated Vase (TVW5), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 24 x 20 x 18 inches

Translated Vase (TVW5), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 24 x 20 x 18 inches, all images via Locks Gallery

Korean artist Yeesookyung masterfully produces imperfect sculptures, bulbous yet elegant works composed from mismatched porcelain. The series, titled “Translated Vase,” was first inspired by the Korean artisan tradition of destroying porcelain works that are not deemed pristine, and she has continued to make the fused pieces since 2001. Intrigued by these tossed aside works and shards, Yee began saving fragmented tea cups and pots rejected by contemporary masters. Honoring the works’ dismantled states, she traces each crevice in 24-karat gold leaf in the style of Japanese kintsugi, merging the unwanted works together in a way that heightens the beauty of their distress. In this way she blends diverse methods to form a contemporary process that evokes both the elegant designs of her homeland and the delicate rebuilding of damaged works in Japanese tradition.

Yee received her undergraduate degree and MFA in painting from the National University in Seoul. She is represented by Kukje Gallery in Seoul, Locks Gallery in Philadelphia, and Ota Fine Arts in Tokyo. This spring she was in the group exhibition “Earth, Fire, and Soul – Masterpieces of Korean Ceramics” at the Grand Palais in Paris. You can see more works from her Translated Vase series on her website.

Translated Vase (TVWG1), 2014, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 71 x 35 1/2 x 31 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVWG1), 2014, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 71 x 35 1/2 x 31 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVW5), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 24 x 20 x 18 inches

Translated Vase (TVW5), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 24 x 20 x 18 inches

Translated Vase (TVWG1), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 61 1/2 x 36 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVWG1), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 61 1/2 x 36 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVWG1), 2013 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 61 1/2 x 36 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVWG1), 2013 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 61 1/2 x 36 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVW8), 2013 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 52 x 28 1/2 x 27 1/2 inches, Collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Translated Vase (TVW8), 2013 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 52 x 28 1/2 x 27 1/2 inches, Collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Translated Vase (TVW8), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 52 x 28 1/2 x 27 1/2 inches, Collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Translated Vase (TVW8), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 52 x 28 1/2 x 27 1/2 inches, Collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Translated Vase (TVG4), 2012 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 42 x 29 x 29 inches

Translated Vase (TVG4), 2012 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 42 x 29 x 29 inches

Translated Vase (TVG4), 2012, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 42 x 29 x 29 inches

Translated Vase (TVG4), 2012, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 42 x 29 x 29 inches

Translated Vase (TVW 6), 2013 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 27 x 26 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVW 6), 2013 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 27 x 26 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVW 6), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 27 x 26 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVW 6), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 27 x 26 x 27 1/2 inches

 

 



Art

Undulating Shell Sculptures by Rowan Mersh

June 21, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Turritella Duplicata II, 2015. Turritella duplicata shells.

London-based artist Rowan Mersh assembles dense rolling surfaces comprised of thousands of seashells, tiny solid objects that now appear like fluid waves. Mimicking the natural geometric patterns found in life, the artist uses responsibly sourced shells like windowpane oyster discs or duplicata shells that are tightly arranged in a labor-intensive process, one piece at a time. The shell artworks are just a small portion of Mersh’s artist practice that also spans fashion design, textile sculptures, and interactive installations. He exhibits internationally with Gallery FUMI where you can see much more of his recent works. (thnx, Laura!)

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Turritella Duplicata II, detail.

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Turritella Duplicata II, detail.

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Turritella Duplicata II, detail.

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Placuna Phoenix IV, 2015. Windowpane oyster shell discs.

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Placuna Phoenix IV, detail.

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Placuna Phoenix IV, detail.

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Placuna Phoenix IV, detail.

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Pithvava Male, 2013. Dentalium shells.

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Pithvava Male, detail.

 

 



Art Food

Whittled Vittles: Realistic Foods Carved from Wood by Seiji Kawasaki

June 20, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Working with tiny pieces of wood, wood sculptor Seiji Kawasaki carves realistic foods that look almost good enough to eat—depending on your taste. From chocolate bars that emerge from jagged pieces of wood to peppers and dried minnows that double as chopstick holders, the artist can create any edible item from a block of wood in just a few hours. Kawasaki has exhibited work in a number of galleries around Japan, and you can see more of his work in this Facebook gallery. If you liked this, also check out the work of Randall Rosenthal. (via My Modern Met, Booooooom.

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Craft

Ultra Satisfying Porcelain Carving Videos by Abe Haruya

June 20, 2016

Christopher Jobson

・ #ceramics #pottery #porcelain#carving #うつわ #器 #しのぎ#飯碗#帳尻合わせ #阿部春弥 ・・

A video posted by Haruya Abe 阿部春弥 (@abe_haruya) on

Japanese ceramic artist Haruya Abe shares short clips of a ceramic carving technique where top layers of porcelain are gently scraped away using a scalpel-like instrument. Not only does it create beautiful results, the process is just satisfying to watch. Given the same tools, I’d scrape these pieces into oblivion. You can see more photos and videos of Haruya’s studio work here. (via @StreetArtGlobe)

・ #ceramics #pottery #porcelain #うつわ#器#面取#阿部春弥 #帳尻合わせ

A video posted by Haruya Abe 阿部春弥 (@abe_haruya) on

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Sponsor

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June 20, 2016

Colossal

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Art

Bisected Boulders With Stretched Bronze Interiors by Romain Langlois

June 17, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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A self-taught sculptor, Romain Langlois studied medical books and anatomical charts to understand the human body, building his first sculptures using only plaster and clay. Seeking a more permanent material, Langlois turned to bronze, a metal he now incorporates into works that are inspired by nature rather than man. His pieces visually pull apart the natural objects that surround us—building works that appear as bisected rocks, boulders, and tree trunks. These sculptures showcase glistening bronze protruding from their insides, unleashing the perceived inner energy of each object.

Langlois is based in La Côte Martin, France. You can see more of his sculptures on Artistics or on his website. (via Juxtapoz)

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