Suspended Tree Sculptures Connect an Artist to His Cuban Roots 

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“Espiritual conexion” (2012), paper, cable, fabric, acrylics and wood, 17.7 x 39.3 x 19.6 inch, all images via Jorge Mayet

Jorge Mayet's tree sculptures produced from paper, wire, fabric, and acrylic showcase the ways in which a tree’s roots often mimic the branches that sprout above ground. In these suspended works the underground systems are far more expansive than what appears above the earth, showing the viewer that what typically appears before us is only half of the real picture. Hanging from invisible wires, Mayet works are a conceptual connection to his own memories and roots growing up in Cuba, a visual metaphor for being uprooted from his home country.

The Cuban expatriate currently lives and works in Mallorca, Spain where he focuses his practice on allegorical landscapes like the ones seen here. You can see more of Mayet’s sculptures on his Facebook. (via Cross Connect Magazine)

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“Me desprendo de ti” (2009), paper, wire, fabric and acrylic, 66.9 x 23.6 x 23.6 inch

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Close up of Me desprendo de ti (2009), paper, wire, fabric and acrylic

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“Untitled” (2009), paper, wire, fabric and acrylic, 39.3 x 19.6 x 19.6 inch

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“Ochún” (2009), wood, paper, wire, fabric and acrylic, 39.3 x 19.6 x 19.6 inch

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“Sobre natural” (2008), wire, paper maché, textil and acrylics, 62.9 x 33.8 x 33.8 inch

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“A todos mis santos” (2008), paper, wire, acrylics and yarn, 45.2 x 27.5 x 23.6 inch

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“Corazón de Fuego” (2010), paper, cable, fabric, acrylics and resin, 55.1 x 33.4 x 33.4 inch

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“Tierra nueva” (2009), paper, wire, fabric and acrylic, 39.3 x 19.6 x 19.6 inch

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“Culto dialéctico de lo sagrado” (2010), paper, feathers, beads and acrylic, 15.3 x 53.1 x 26.3 inch

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Terrarium Lamps by Nui Studio Light Your Space with Suspended Ecosystems 

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All images courtesy of Nui Studio, © ErwinBlock Photography

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Nui Studio (formerly We Love Eames) has designed a lamp fit for the dim and sun-shielded garden apartments of the world, the living and working locations that are void of the light needed to grow lush plants indoors. The project is titled the Mygdal plant lamp, and is built from mouth-blown glass and aluminum. The plants placed inside this environment thrive on a completely self-sustained ecosystem that needs neither natural light or watering, with the installed LED lights sufficient enough to aid in photosynthesis for most plants.

The name of the lamp is a tribute to the Danish hometown of glassmaker Peter Kuchinke, and translates to mean “fertile soil.” Two minimal versions of the lamps were built, one to hang from the ceiling, while the other rests on top of a flat surface.

Nui Studio was founded in 2014 by Emilia Lucht and Arne Sebrantke. The two met while studying industrial design at Muthesius Academy of Fine Art where they started dating and designing together. The creative duo is currently finishing their masters degree at Burg Giebichenstein University of Art and Design. You can explore more of their furniture design and projects on their Facebook. (via Colossal Submissions)

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New York City’s Last Accordion Repairman 

Since the 1960s, Alex Carozza has been repairing and building accordions in New York City for customers around the world. Now, at the age of 88, he’s reportedly the only person left in the city still repairing these complicated instruments in a cramped studio with his 93-year-old assistant. Great Big Story sits down with the “Sultan of Squeezeboxes” for a brief but charming interview. (via Devour)

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Explosive Cut Paper Sculptures by Clare Pentlow 

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Image via Ann Martin

Clare Pentlow makes delicate paper look almost dangerous, in the most organized and beautiful way. Cutting hundreds of sharp points into folded layers of paper, Pentlow forms circular designs that mimic the center of exotic flowers. The works are typically composed of a multitude of colors, yet the monochrome pieces do not pale in comparison to their bright companions. You can see more of the London-based artist’s concentric artworks on her Instagram and Twitter.  (via All Things Paper)

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Image courtesy of Clare Pentlow

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Image via Ann Martin

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Image via Ann Martin

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Image via Ann Martin

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Image via Ann Martin

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Image via Ann Martin

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Image via Ann Martin

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Vintage Books Transformed Into Layered Rings, Bracelets, and Pendants by Jeremy May 

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Image via RR Gallery

Jewelry maker Jeremy May designs wearable pieces from the layered pages of vintage books, transforming their content into unique works that are nearly impossible to trace back to their paper origin. To make these multi-shaped works, May first laminates hundreds of sheets of paper together. He then creates the shape for the piece, and finishes it off with a high gloss coating. After production, May often inserts the works back into the books, bringing the transformed and colorful pages back to their material source.

Although many of the pieces lose the words and images on the book’s original pages, some preserve hints to the jewelry’s former life in snippets of text or photographs that make it onto the final piece. Each ring or bracelet he produces is formed through a book that May finds inspiring, allowing the jewelry’s content to match its pleasing aesthetic.

The London-based artist is a part of the group exhibition “Read and Worn: Jewelry From Books” at RR Gallery in New York City through April 24. (via My Modern Met)

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Image via Jeremy May

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Image via Jeremy May

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Image via Jeremy May

Image via RR Gallery

Image via RR Gallery

Image via RR Gallery

Image via RR Gallery

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Image via Jeremy May

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Image via Jeremy May

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Image via Jeremy May

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Image via Jeremy May

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A Fascinating Step-by-Step Animation Showing the Technique of Making a Bronze Cast 

Created for the Hadrian Exhibition at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem last December, this short animation details the elaborate process of creating a bronze cast using the lost-wax technique. The mix of stop motion and 2D animation is perfect for showing the materials used in each step along with helpful cross sections of what happens inside the mold. It’s so interesting to realize that the image depicted is transferred five times through different mediums —the original sculpture, plaster mold, wax, plaster again, bronze—before arriving at the final bronze artwork. Directed and animated by Renana Aldor and Kobi Vogman. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

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