Beautiful Illustrations from DKNG Now Available as Postcards

Beautiful Illustrations from DKNG Now Available as Postcards posters and prints postcards illustration

The team over at DKNG (previously) has just released a set of 16 postcards featuring their original illustrations. You can see the rest of the set over on their blog, and pick it up here for just $10. (via omg posters)

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The Sandwich Book

The Sandwich Book paper food books

The Sandwich Book paper food books

The Sandwich Book paper food books

The Sandwich Book paper food books

The Sandwich Book paper food books

Designed by Wrocław-based artist and designer Pawel Piotrowski, the Sandwich Book is exactly what you think it is, an entire book made from pages that look like the common ingredients for a typical sandwich. Aaaaand I’m hungry. (via quipsologies)

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Leandro Erlich’s Reflective Optical Illusion House Now in London

Leandro Erlichs Reflective Optical Illusion House Now in London optical illusion mirrors installation

Leandro Erlichs Reflective Optical Illusion House Now in London optical illusion mirrors installation

Leandro Erlichs Reflective Optical Illusion House Now in London optical illusion mirrors installation

Leandro Erlichs Reflective Optical Illusion House Now in London optical illusion mirrors installation

Leandro Erlichs Reflective Optical Illusion House Now in London optical illusion mirrors installation

Leandro Erlichs Reflective Optical Illusion House Now in London optical illusion mirrors installation

Leandro Erlichs Reflective Optical Illusion House Now in London optical illusion mirrors installation

Leandro Erlichs Reflective Optical Illusion House Now in London optical illusion mirrors installation

Want to pretend you’re Spiderman but can’t afford the suit and the genetic mutation? Argentine artist Leandro Erlich was commissioned by the Barbican in London to install a version of his wildly popular optical illusion that creates the visual effect of instant weightlessness. Using a wall of giant mirrors propped against a huge horizontal print of a Victorian terraced house, visitors are free to climb and jump around as their reflections appear to move freely without the pesky effects of gravity. Titled Dalston House the piece was erected in Hackney just off Dalston Junction on a disused lot that has remained vacant since it was bombed during the Second World War.

The installation opens today and is free to all visitors and will remain up through August 4th. Erlich will also be giving a talk tomorrow starting at 7:30pm. All images courtesy the Barbican. (via visual news)

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Go Behind the Scenes to Watch How Heather Dewey-Hagborg Creates Portraits with Found DNA

Go Behind the Scenes to Watch How Heather Dewey Hagborg Creates Portraits with Found DNA genetics documentary DNA

Go Behind the Scenes to Watch How Heather Dewey Hagborg Creates Portraits with Found DNA genetics documentary DNA

Go Behind the Scenes to Watch How Heather Dewey Hagborg Creates Portraits with Found DNA genetics documentary DNA

Just a few weeks ago we covered the amazing 3D-printed portraits created by artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg, who uses genetic clues from found DNA to determine an estimation of what that person might look like. In this short documentary filmed by TED’s Kari Mulholland, we learn a lot more about what goes on behind the scenes as Dewey-Hagborg utilizes the facilities at Genspace in New York to create each of her DNA portraits.

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Putting Down Roots: New Paintings of Urban Growth and Turmoil by Amy Casey

Putting Down Roots: New Paintings of Urban Growth and Turmoil by Amy Casey urban painting
Megalopolis

Putting Down Roots: New Paintings of Urban Growth and Turmoil by Amy Casey urban painting
Megapolis, detail

Putting Down Roots: New Paintings of Urban Growth and Turmoil by Amy Casey urban painting
Ribbon Walls

Putting Down Roots: New Paintings of Urban Growth and Turmoil by Amy Casey urban painting
High-rise

Putting Down Roots: New Paintings of Urban Growth and Turmoil by Amy Casey urban painting
Connectors Connecting

Putting Down Roots: New Paintings of Urban Growth and Turmoil by Amy Casey urban painting
Cascade

Putting Down Roots: New Paintings of Urban Growth and Turmoil by Amy Casey urban painting
Cascade, detail

Putting Down Roots: New Paintings of Urban Growth and Turmoil by Amy Casey urban painting
Lean To

Putting Down Roots: New Paintings of Urban Growth and Turmoil by Amy Casey urban painting
Hanging Forest

Artist Amy Casey (previously) just unveiled a new collection of work at Zg Gallery here in Chicago. Titled Putting Down Roots the paintings continue an ongoing fictional saga of characters living in Casey’s artwork who often face great adversity from killer plants, collapsing structures, and other desperate means to keep their cities afloat or intact. From the looks of it things have improved dramatically for these little painted inhabitants who appear to have weathered the storm and are now thriving within Casey’s bizarre, suspended worlds. From the artist:

After any pendulum swing of chaos grinds to a slow halt, there will come a time when you will have to decide if you are going to wallow in the rubble or take what remains and create a new empire. Building upon recent work, I have been in search of a solid ground. A bit less kinetic than past work, I have been trying to take what was left of the world in my paintings and create a stability of sorts, thinking about community ties and the security (or illusion of security) needed to nurture growth. Cities are fascinating creatures that I am just beginning to scratch the surface of.

In the video above from Cleveland Arts Prize she talks at length about her process and the continuing narrative that weaves through years of her art. Interestingly, every building or house in each of her paintings is based on actual source materials. Casey will take photographs of some 500 individual houses, office buildings, and water towers which she then uses as reference for every small small structure you see in her artwork.

Putting Down Roots will be up through July 6th, with a smaller selection of work on view through August. All images copyright Amy Casey, courtesy Zg Gallery.

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Sponsor // Berndnaut Smilde: Making Clouds

A few onlookers hold their collective breath as Dutch artist Berndnaut Smilde pushes a remote control button to activate a smoke machine in the Green Room of the Veterans Building in downtown San Francisco. Billowing smoke forms a luscious, cotton candy-like mass in the middle of the Beaux-Arts chamber before it vaporizes into haze, casting a luminous complexion on the room.

“It’s not so much about the shape of the cloud but about placing it out of its natural context,” he says. “It brings duality, because you can’t really grasp how to interpret the situation you are viewing. People have always had strong metaphysical connections to clouds as they symbolize the ominous.”

People’s fascination with Smilde’s clouds have only increased since TIME magazine listed them as one of the “Top 10 inventions of 2012″.

Watch as Berndnaut Smilde makes clouds in this latest video from The Avant/Garde Diaries.Sponsor // Berndnaut Smilde: Making Clouds sponsor

Ordinary Behavior: Cardboard Electronics Containing Absurd Miniature Dioramas

Ordinary Behavior: Cardboard Electronics Containing Absurd Miniature Dioramas paper miniature electronics dioramas cardboard

Ordinary Behavior: Cardboard Electronics Containing Absurd Miniature Dioramas paper miniature electronics dioramas cardboard

Ordinary Behavior: Cardboard Electronics Containing Absurd Miniature Dioramas paper miniature electronics dioramas cardboard

Ordinary Behavior: Cardboard Electronics Containing Absurd Miniature Dioramas paper miniature electronics dioramas cardboard

Artist and illustrator Kevin LCK works almost exclusively in black and white, so it comes as no surprise that as he’s ventured into sculptural objects the aesthetic has remained the same, while the dimensions clearly haven’t. In his new series Ordinary Behavior the artist builds dioramas into everyday electronic objects made from cardboard such as a computer, camera, and iPhone. The artist says his intention is to highlight the sometimes unhealthy relationship people have with technology and explains his thoughts in his artist statement:

‘Ordinary Behavior’ is a project about the unhealthy relationship between human and technology in an everyday context. [...] I seeked to detach the audience from the real world temporarily, provide them with a space to rethink and reconsider the way we behave and think about the relationship between ourselves, objects and environment with technology in a more conscious way.

You can see several more from the series here, and see how several of the objects came together on his blog. (via beautiful/decay, junk culture)

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