This Long-Exposure Photo Captures Marin County in a River of Fog Lit by a Full Moon

September 9, 2016

Christopher Jobson


Two weeks ago in the middle of the night, Italian photographer Lorenzo Montezemolo climbed Mt. Tamalpais in Marin County, California and waited for what he knew would be the perfect conditions for a spectacular long-exposure photograph. As the fog slowly rolled by he opened his shutter for three minutes, long enough for the full moon above to illuminate the surreal landscape you see here. The resulting image is nothing short of phenomenal.

“I chose to use a long exposure in order to give the incoming fog a smooth, striated appearance as it slithered over the ridge below,” Montezemolo shares with Colossal. “For the past year I’ve been crossing the Golden Gate Bridge several times a week to photograph the beautiful landscapes, seascapes and fog of Marin County, just north of San Francisco.”

You can see much more of Montezemolo’s photography on Flickr, and Instagram.



Art Craft

Textile Sculptures Created From Dozens of Multicolored Orbs by Serena Garcia Dalla Venezia

September 8, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski


Chilean textile artist Serena Garcia Dalla Venezia creates thoughtfully composed arrangements of hand-sewn fabric balls, producing texture and depth by grouping together dozens of differently sized and shaped spheres. Appearing almost like organic growths, her works seem to be transforming before your eyes, which makes sense when you consider her fascination with accumulation and chaos. You can see more of Venezia’s smaller works and large-scale installations on her website. (via The Jealous Curator)











Print & Sell Your Own Wares With a Free Online Store from Threadless Artist Shops (Sponsor)

September 8, 2016



Wanna sell your art in an online shop without dealing with the manufacturing, shipping, returns, and extra stock? Artist Shops by Threadless make running your online shop easy by taking care of all that hassle, leaving you more time to make great art. And best of all, sign up is totally free.

Artist Shops make customization a breeze, offering multiple layouts, colors, and display options that allow you to make your shop unique; no confusion or coding required. Customize everything from your shop’s appearance, to what apparel styles and colors you offer.

Sign up is quick, easy, and totally free. Reserve your Artist Shop now and sell your art on apparel pain-free.

Want to see Artist Shops in action? Check out Tara McPherson, Camille Chew and Alex Pardee.




New Affectionate Murals Painted on the Streets of Italy and Beyond by Millo

September 8, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski


Italian artist Francesco Camillo Giogino, also known as Millo (previously), is known for his site-specific street murals that adorn buildings with a cast of curious characters painted in primarily black and white. Millo adds subtle color to his works, highlighting hearts, thermometers, and vegetation with shades of red and green. His most recent mural (seen above) is titled In Bloom and was painted in Milan. You can see more of his murals on his website, and on Facebook.









Design Food Illustration

New Scenes of Fantasy and Disaster on Traditional Blue Porcelain Dinner Plates by Calamityware

September 8, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski


Look once you see your grandmother’s china, look twice and you see… Big Foot? Don Moyer, the graphic designer behind Calamityware (previously here and here), has designed several more white porcelain plates playfully poking the traditional blue Willow pattern design. On his plates, intricate patterns found on the outer edge trick the eye until one notices mysterious occurrences happening near the center. Pirate ships take over Victorian villages, swamp monsters grab for traditional Japanese pagodas, and erupting volcanoes threaten to overtake peaceful towns.

Two of Moyer’s newest plate designs, a group of savage zombie poodles and a soaring pterodactyl, are currently on Kickstarter. You can purchase these plates on Calamityware’s website, where you will also find some dishware crawling with ants and flies.









Art Design

Masterfully Designed LEGO Animals by Felix Jaensch

September 8, 2016

Christopher Jobson


German artist Felix Jaensch has an uncanny ability to translate the ruffle of parrot feathers or the lumpy fur of orangutans into lifelike LEGO sculptures. He shares many of his original designs on Flickr and a few pieces including the red fox are available is DIY kits through MOC Nation. He’s also trying to get support on LEGO Ideas for his guinea pig design. (via Matt’s Brick Gallery)











Design History

A Fascinating Film About the Last Day of Hot Metal Typesetting at the New York Times

September 7, 2016

Christopher Jobson

On July 2, 1978 the New York Times made a significant technological leap when they scuttled the last of 60 manually-operated linotype machines to usher in the era of digital and photographic typesetting. When working at 100% efficiency with an experienced operator the Linotype machines could produce 14 lines per minute cast on the spot from hot lead. That number would increase to 1,000 lines per minute the very next day using an array of computers and digital storage.

Typesetter Carl Schlesinger and filmmaker David Loeb Weiss documented the last day of hot metal typesetting in a film called Farewell — ETAOIN SHRDLU (the obscure title is poignantly explained in the film). This amazing behind-the-scenes view not only captures the laborious effort to create a single page of printed type, but also the the emotions and thoughts of several New York Times employees as they candidly discuss their feelings about transitioning to a new technology. One man decides he’s not ready for the digital age and plans to retire on the spot after 49 years, while others seem to transition smoothly into the new methods of production.

This historically significant documentary was digitized in 2015 and made available online in HD from Linotype: The Film, another documentary about linotype printing that includes portions of Farewell. While I’ve always been somewhat familiar with the history of typesetting and printing, I didn’t fully grasp the absurd mechanical complexity and scale required to print a newspaper before the digital age. Each newspaper page was cast in a 40 lb. block of lead!? A huge number of employees were deaf!? If you’re a graphic design or typography professor, here’s a great way to spend 30 minutes.

If you’re super interested, the New York Times TimesMachine has a complete high resolution scan of the final hot metal typeset newspaper made in the film. (via Reddit)