Torafu’s Haunted Art Gallery for Kids at the Tokyo Museum of Contemporary Art

Torafus Haunted Art Gallery for Kids at the Tokyo Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo kids exhibition art galleries

Torafus Haunted Art Gallery for Kids at the Tokyo Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo kids exhibition art galleries

Torafus Haunted Art Gallery for Kids at the Tokyo Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo kids exhibition art galleries

Torafus Haunted Art Gallery for Kids at the Tokyo Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo kids exhibition art galleries

Torafus Haunted Art Gallery for Kids at the Tokyo Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo kids exhibition art galleries

Torafus Haunted Art Gallery for Kids at the Tokyo Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo kids exhibition art galleries

Torafus Haunted Art Gallery for Kids at the Tokyo Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo kids exhibition art galleries

Torafus Haunted Art Gallery for Kids at the Tokyo Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo kids exhibition art galleries

In an attempt to better engage the youngest visitors to the Museum of Contemporary Art in Tokyo, Torafu Architects created a special art gallery just for kids called Haunted House. On entering the exhibition a few familiar artworks appear hung in frames around a large white cube, but something is clearly amiss as everything appears to be moving.

The eyes in a portrait dart back and forth, a pair of hands emerges from Mona Lisa’s face and begins to manipulate the painting, the head of a portrait turns around in loops, and then a wave of relief as children realize this isn’t another crummy art gallery with old boring art. A secret passageway leads to the cube’s interior where almost every artwork can be manipulated or altered from behind, a place where the art can be touched and kids are free to laugh, run and play while interacting directly with some of the world’s most famous paintings. A killer idea.

You can see much more about Haunted House over on Yatzer, and see more images on Torafu’s website. Photos by Yoshitsugu Fuminari. (via Yatzer)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Unlikely: The Impossible and Improbable Objects of Giuseppe Colarusso

Unlikely: The Impossible and Improbable Objects of Giuseppe Colarusso sculpture humor digital

Unlikely: The Impossible and Improbable Objects of Giuseppe Colarusso sculpture humor digital

Unlikely: The Impossible and Improbable Objects of Giuseppe Colarusso sculpture humor digital

Unlikely: The Impossible and Improbable Objects of Giuseppe Colarusso sculpture humor digital

Unlikely: The Impossible and Improbable Objects of Giuseppe Colarusso sculpture humor digital

Unlikely: The Impossible and Improbable Objects of Giuseppe Colarusso sculpture humor digital

Unlikely: The Impossible and Improbable Objects of Giuseppe Colarusso sculpture humor digital

Unlikely: The Impossible and Improbable Objects of Giuseppe Colarusso sculpture humor digital

Unlikely: The Impossible and Improbable Objects of Giuseppe Colarusso sculpture humor digital

Unlikely: The Impossible and Improbable Objects of Giuseppe Colarusso sculpture humor digital

Unlikely: The Impossible and Improbable Objects of Giuseppe Colarusso sculpture humor digital

In this ongoing series titled Unlikely, artist and photographer Giuseppe Colarusso imagines bizarre and humorous objects, each of which is either technically impossible, improbable, or simply useless in its proposed design. Colarusso tells me via email that many of the pieces he fabricates himself, however some are digitally created in Photoshop. So what’s the point? He hopes each image will make you stop, think and hopefully bring a smile to your face, which is definitely a worthy cause. Also, I would pay top dollar for that spray paint can with adjustable hue sliders, so could somebody make that? See some 50+ additional concepts over on his website. (via Bored Panda)

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Each Line One Breath: Morphogenetic Freehand Drawings By John Franzen

Each Line One Breath: Morphogenetic Freehand Drawings By John Franzen process drawing

Each Line One Breath: Morphogenetic Freehand Drawings By John Franzen process drawing

Each Line One Breath: Morphogenetic Freehand Drawings By John Franzen process drawing

Each Line One Breath: Morphogenetic Freehand Drawings By John Franzen process drawing

Each Line One Breath: Morphogenetic Freehand Drawings By John Franzen process drawing

Each Line One Breath: Morphogenetic Freehand Drawings By John Franzen process drawing

In his series of drawings titled Each Line One Breath, Netherlands-based artist John Franzen creates textured drawings remeniscent of wrinkled fabric or waves of water by drawing tediously placed rows of lines with black ink. The artist begins by drawing a single vertical line on the far side of a canvas but on subsequent lines allows for various imperfections to become amplified or suppressed as he continues, line after line. The process, which might look maddening, actually appears to be a sort of meditative effort for Franzen who works with almost robotic precision. Watch the two videos above to see how he works. If you liked this you might also enjoy the work of Tony Orrico. (via Booooooom, Saatchi Online)

Update: Franzen will be in Berlin next Tuesday as part of a new exhibition at Platoon Kunsthalle.

See related posts on Colossal about , .

The Geometric Artwork of Andy Gilmore

The Geometric Artwork of Andy Gilmore geometric

The Geometric Artwork of Andy Gilmore geometric

The Geometric Artwork of Andy Gilmore geometric

The Geometric Artwork of Andy Gilmore geometric

The Geometric Artwork of Andy Gilmore geometric

The Geometric Artwork of Andy Gilmore geometric

The Geometric Artwork of Andy Gilmore geometric

Rochester-based artist Andy Gilmore turns math into art, creating hypnotizing and kaledscopic patterns that are heavily influenced by patterns he encounters in nature as well as music. The prolific artist has numerous commercial clients including Wired, Nike, and the New York Times, but has also released his own visual compositions through Ghostly International Editions since 2010. Gilmore just released a new body of work and sat down with Ghostly in the video above to talk about his process and influence. (via Colossal Submissions, and thnx Steve!)

See related posts on Colossal about .

Sponsor // GoThinkBig & Rizzle Kicks Team Up On Music Video Project to Provide Work Experience to Young People

GoThinkBig – a work experience and internship initiative launched by O2 – recently teamed up with chart-topping duo Rizzle Kicks to recruit almost 100 young people in the UK to help produce the music video for their new single, “Lost Generation.”

The project offered these young people a unique opportunity to kick-start their career by landing a work placement as part of the production team for the music video, while being mentored by the best professional production cast in the industry.

A huge range of positions were made available across a variety of roles, from runners to stage hands, make-up artists to cast, camera crew to directors, producers, and editors—and in the marketing and promotion departments.

Watch a behind-the-scenes video of the shoot and check out other great work experience opportunities at gothinkbig.co.uk, or on Facebook and Twitter.

Sponsor // GoThinkBig & Rizzle Kicks Team Up On Music Video Project to Provide Work Experience to Young People sponsor Sponsor // GoThinkBig & Rizzle Kicks Team Up On Music Video Project to Provide Work Experience to Young People sponsor

More of the Best Nature GIFs on the Web

More of the Best Nature GIFs on the Web nature gifs

More of the Best Nature GIFs on the Web nature gifs

More of the Best Nature GIFs on the Web nature gifs

More of the Best Nature GIFs on the Web nature gifs

More of the Best Nature GIFs on the Web nature gifs

More of the Best Nature GIFs on the Web nature gifs

More of the Best Nature GIFs on the Web nature gifs

More of the Best Nature GIFs on the Web nature gifs

Back in February we first explored an ongoing project called Head Like an Orange (previously) by a Netherlands-based artist named Marinus who isolates key segments of nature films, often just a split second in length, and uses the footage to create beatiful, whimsical, and strangely poetic gifs. These are a few of my favorites from the last several months but you can see much more right here.

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Manifest Station: A Transparent Utility Box Painted by Mona Caron

Manifest Station: A Transparent Utility Box Painted by Mona Caron trompe loeil street art painting optical illusion murals

This fun piece was painted by illustrator and muralist Mona Caron on Duboce Avenue at Church Street in San Francisco. Titled Manifest Station, the small mural was painted on a standard utility box and has to be viewed from a specific spot so that the horizon lines of the artwork match those of the actual intersection. As an added bonus, a mural in the background which was repainted in part on the utility box is actually an older piece by the same artist. Caron is currently working on a surprisngly great series of weeds and just painted a giant wildflower in Union City. (via CJWHO)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

Page 135 of 498«...134135136137...»