Layered Glass Table Concept Creates a Cross-Section of the Ocean 


We’ve seen no shortage of projects using layers of glass to simulate bodies of water the last few days. First we had glass sculptures by Ben Young, followed by several amazing river and lake tables Greg Klassen. Now we have designer Christopher Duff of Duffy London who has released concept images of the Abyss Table, a carefully layered table made from sculpted Perspex and wood that creates a geographic cross-section of the ocean. The tables will be limited to a series of 25 and are available for purchase here.

It should be noted that these are digital renderings of what the final piece should look like, it will be great to see photos of the actual tables once they are built. You can see a few more renderings on their Facebook page. (via designboom)






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A Triple Lightning Strike on Three of Chicago’s Tallest Buildings 



Even by Chicago standards the weather here in the midwestern U.S. has been bizarre and extreme lately. We’ve seen giant walls of fog caused in part by a bitterly cold winter that chilled Lake Michigan, and numerous lightning storms that last for hours. Local videographer Craig Shimala was filming a timelapse of a derecho from his home this week when he managed to capture a triple lightning strike on three of Chicago’s tallest buildings: Willis Tower, Trump Tower and the John Hancock Building. Even more incredibly, he filmed the same occurrence almost four years ago to the day back in 2010.

To see more examples of our wild weather, check out recent photos by Nick Uliveri and Pete Tsai.

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Outbreak: Hand Cut Paper Microbes and Pathogens by Rogan Brown 


Artist Rogan Brown (previously) just completed work on his latest paper artwork titled Outbreak, a piece he describes as an exploration “of the microbiological sublime.” Over four months in the making, the work depicts an array of interconnected sculptures—entirely hand cut from paper—based on the smallest structures found within the human body: cells, microbes, pathogens, and neurons. Outbreak represents nearly four months of tedious planning, cutting and assembly. He shares about his process:

I am inspired in part by the tradition of scientific drawing and model making, and particularly the work of artist-scientists such as Ernst Haeckel. But although my approach involves careful observation and detailed “scientific” preparatory drawings, these are always superseded by the work of the imagination; everything has to be refracted through the prism of the imagination, estranged and in some way transformed.

You can see more details over in his portfolio.






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Art Students Transform an Electrical Tower into a Stained Glass Lighthouse 


Back in 2010, a trio of art students from Klasse Löbbert in Germany took it upon themselves to transform a boring electrical tower into a translucent, stained glass installation. Titled Leuchtturm (Lighthouse) the urban artwork in Hattingen, Germany was conceived by Ail Hwang, Hae-Ryan Jeong and Chung-Ki Park, who used cut triangles of Acrylglas to mimic the function of traditional stained glass pieces. If you liked this, also check out William Lamson’s sugar solarium or Tom Fruin’s Watertower in Brooklyn.

Photo via Günter Pilger

Photos via Günter Pilger and Caroline Wengeler

Photo by Alte Gurke

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Reverse Perspective Painting Creates Amazing Optical Illusion as You Move around It 


First: watch the shaky video, it’s all spoilers here on out.

On first view of this clip by Benjamin Dalsgaard Hughes, I was convinced the skewed perspective of the painting was some kind of digital trick on an HD display, somewhat similar to the dancing shadows we saw a few months ago. But then, the sudden disorienting reveal. What! This particular optical illusion is what’s known as reverse perspective painting, where objects (usually rooms) are painted on a physically skewed surface resulting in images that appear in reverse when viewed head on.

The painting above is by Brian Williams and is currently on view as part of a show on 3D art that just opened at The Gallery Ice in Windsor. Perhaps the most well-known artist working with forced perspective is Patrick Hughes. Here he is discussing his own work at Flowers Gallery a few years ago. Love the bit at the end where the entire crowd is squatting up and down to view the painting.

(via Sploid)

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New Murals from Etam Cru on the Streets of Oslo and Montreal 


Bezt & Sainer / Etam Cru

Two fantastic new murals today from Sainer and Bezt of Etam Cru. The first, depicting a girl holding birdhouses was completed last month in Montreal as part of the second MURAL Festival. The second, featuring an imaginative boy brushing his teeth, was just completed in Oslo by both Sainer and Bezt. See more of both pieces over on StreetArtNews.

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Edible Anatomically Accurate Chocolate Human Skulls 

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Cannibalism never tasted so good. These anatomically accurate chocolate skulls are life-size because, well, they were cast from a mold taken from a genuine human skull. They’re the creation of UK-based chocolatier BlackChocolateCo, a duo who combined their passion for art and chocolate, which yielded this fantastic creation that they sell over on their etsy shop.

Each edible skull is hand-made from fine Belgian chocolate and is available in 4 different flavors. Guaranteed to make your dinner party a bit more grisly. (via Boing Boing)

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