Vintage Vespa Parts Recontextualized as Sleek Modern Office Furniture 

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All images provided by Bel & Bel

The sleek build of Vespa scooters have been redesigned to remain stationary, dissected and rebuilt as office furniture. Fit for an Italian motorist, the Scooter Chair, is handmade by Spanish studio Bel & Bel in a numbered series with a large variety of color combinations to choose for your office or home. Although it may appear like a normal swivel chair from the front, when turned around you can see how the curves of the vintage Vespa parts match that of the faux leather chair to create a sleek and ergonomic design.

To further imitate their design inspiration, each chair also comes with functioning taillights. More than 200 of these up-cycled pieces have been sold around the world, and because each and every chair is built by hand, they are all certifiably unique. To understand the process of making one of Bel & Bel’s chairs, visit their blog. (My Modern Met)

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Tiny Ink Drawings Scaled to the Size of Pencils, Fingers, and Matchsticks by Christian Watson 

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All images courtesy of Christian Watson (@1924us)

Christian Watson, illustrator and owner of 1924, posts images to Instagram multiple times a day, pictures that showcase his cross-country adventures, vintage cameras, and sporadically his own miniature ink drawings that are often less than a half an inch tall. The tiny illustrations seem to mimic the rustic adventures found in his photographs—pulling in log cabins, lighthouses, and animals that teeter on the tip of his pencils or crawl to the top of his fingers. Take a look at more of Watson’s hand lettering and micro illustrations on his Instagram. (via Arch Atlas)

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Things Organized Neatly: A New Book of Compulsively Organized Things by Austin Radcliffe 

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Sarah Illenberger

One of my oldest sources of visual inspiration on the internet (and one of a handful of early art/design blogs that inspired me to start Colossal in 2010) was Things Organized Neatly, an exhuastive catalogue of objects compusively organized just so. From toy collections, to artworks and editorial photography, the site collects thousands of images of neatly arranged things that have a near Zen-like impact on your brain as you scroll through the site.

Run by blogger and curator Austin Radcliffe, Things Organized Neatly has picked up more press and awards over the years than almost any other tumblelog. Now, after six years of publishing, the very best of Things Organized Neatly has made its way to print in a new book published by Universe, with a foreward by artist Tom Sachs. Can’t wait to get my hands on a copy.

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Colorful Basket Weaving Sculptures by Nathalie Miebach Transform Weather Data into Visual Art 

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“Musical Buoy in Search Towards a New Shore” (2009), all images courtesy of Nathalie Miebach

Nathalie Miebach's colorful sculptures look like children’s toys gone awry, as if the designer inlcuded far too many twists and turns for a child to possibly follow. It would make sense that these twisted routes would throw one off course, as they are modeled from scientific data pulled from wind patterns, often from storms, gales or blizzards. Miebach translates this quantified data into physical forms that mimic the twirling motions of the invisible weather they aim to imitate.

“The method that I use is basket weaving because basket weaving is a very simple three dimensional grid that I can use to translate data with,” said Miebach. “Everything in the sculpture, whether it is a colorful bead, a string, whether it’s a dowel or reed, represents a different data point. Nothing is put on there for purely aesthetic reasons.”

The Boston artist discovered this process while simultaneously taking an astronomy class at Harvard and learning basket weaving as an extracurricular activity. She yearned for a way to physically display the data she was learning about in class, and thus her 3D scientific models were born. In a field where one is not able to see the data they collect, her sculptures give a form to that which was previously only able to be felt, tasted, and smelled.

Not only do her pieces serve as aesthetic objects, but readable sources of concrete data. “It is important for me that these pieces are actually very accurate because I want them to live in the science world as much as in the sculpture or craft world,” said Miebach. “I still want you to be able to read the weather off of these sculptures.”

You can learn more about Miebach’s process while taking a peak inside her studio in the video from Great Big Story below:

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“To Captain Billy Tyne and His Crew” (2015)

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“Hurricane Noel” (2011)

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“The Andrea Gail” (2011)

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“And the Winds Kept Roaring Through the Night” (2011)

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“In the Shadow of a Giant” (2013)

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“Hurricane Noel,” 2011.

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The musical score for “Hurricane Noel.”

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Painstaking Folk Art Papercuts by Suzy Taylor 

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Based in rural Devon, UK, artist Suzy Taylor works with an X-Acto knife and sheets of paper to cut skulls, animals, and entire family trees composed of dense arrays of leaves and flowers. Each piece begins as a complete drawing and is then cut from paper over a period of hours or days. Though many of her designs are original commissions, she also turns much of her work into prints and stationery that are sometimes available from her shop (currently on vacation) and Not On the High Street. You can follow more of her recent work on Instagram. (via Culture N Lifestyle)

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This New Cycle and Pedestrian Tunnel in Amsterdam Features an 80,000 Tile Mural Inspired by Cornelis Boumeester 

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Recently constructed by Benthem Crouwel, this expansive new pedestrian and cycling tunnel in Amsterdam features a fantastic tile mural depicting a fleet of ships in rough seas. The 361-foot path called the Cuyperspassage connects the city center to the IJ waterfront and sees some 15,000 commuters daily.

The darker cycling lane incorporates sound-absorbing asphalt and steel grates, while the pedestrian side is almost completely wrapped in a mural of 80,000 delft blue tiles. The artwork was designed by artist Irma Boom, heavily inspired by the work of Dutch tile artist Cornelis Boumeester. The two lanes are further delineated by LEDs to create a safe multi-function corridor with minimal barriers. From Benthem Crouwel:

Along the footpath wall is a tile tableau designed by Irma Boom Office. The design steps off from a restored work by the Rotterdam tile painter Cornelis Boumeester (1652-1733). His tile panel depicting the Warship Rotterdam and the Herring Fleet is in the collection of the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. Irma Boom replaced the original crest on the stern with the Amsterdam coat of arms. The cyclist or pedestrian leaves the old historic part of Amsterdam through Cuyperspassage and heads towards ‘new Amsterdam’ in the north, or vice versa. The tableau fades away towards the IJ-river, the lines of the original work gradually dissolving. Then it builds up again in an abstract form from light to dark blue, as if encouraging cyclists to slow down as the ferry comes into view.

You can see more views and read more about the Cuyperspassage on both Arch Daily and Designboom.

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