Art

Hilarious Kinetic Eye Sculptures by Lucas Zanotto

October 3, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

EYES is a short film by Lucas Zanotto (previously) showcasing several kinetic sculptures both built and filmed by the Helsinki-based director. Each installation is composed of simple parts that subtly imitate an action associated with one’s eyes. In one piece, two transparent globes slowly leak streams of water onto the floor below. In another, two black balls swing back and forth above an open book, slowly scanning the pages below. You can watch more of Zanotto’s videos on his Instagram and Vimeo, and take a look at all nine of his optical installations in the short piece above. Sound design by David Kamp.

 

 



Art

A Mountain of Nesting Heads at the Foot of the Alps by Andrea Casciu

October 3, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Artist Andrea Casciu just finished work on this crisp new mural of nesting blue heads titled “The Soul of the Mountain” in Pinerolo, Italy as part of the Street Alps festival. He says the work is a metaphor of sorts that represents our relationship to the mountains through various “realities” we each encounter there. You can follow more of his work on Instagram. (via StreetArtNews)

 

 



Animation Art Illustration

Transport Cats Across an Animated Countryside With Alexander Perrin’s Interactive Illustration ‘Short Trip’

September 29, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Short Trip is an interactive illustration by Australian artist Alexander Perrin. The meditative simulation places the player in the conductor’s seat of a cross-country train, allowing the user to use their arrow keys to go forwards or backwards through the game’s peaceful black and white countryside while delivering a series of animated cat passengers.

The illustrated simulation took Perrin five years to complete, from researching how a graphite-based drawing could be presented on a digital platform, to creating all the necessary components of the train’s journey by hand. His interest for this particular scenery came from riding on the Hakone Tozan Railway in Japan, one of his favorite ways of travel.

“It’s a magical, rickety switchback railway that ascends a forest shrouded mountain all throughout the year,” Perrin told Colossal. “There’s something about the beautifully crafted forms of the railway in sculpted union with the cliff faces and trees that just hits such a therapeutic, aesthetic sweet spot. It’s a little bit like riding an enlarged miniature railway, if you know what I mean. You remain passive and enjoy the ride for the sake of the journey.”

The game was built with this passiveness in mind, the only “goal” of the project to get to the other side of the railway while you enjoy the scenery and relaxing soundtrack of gentle bird chirping and cable car as it softly rumbles across the tracks. We recommend make the game full-screen with audio to get the full, tranquil experience of Short Trip.

You can watch a scene from an earlier game prototype by Perrin called Noirmittens in the video below, and see more clips from his current simulator on his website and Instagram.

 

 



Design

Anatomical Fish Zip Bags by Japanese Designer Keiko Otsuhata

September 29, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Japanese designer Keiko Otsuhata has brought a new dimension to the popularity of fish as food by turning the sea creature into a functional-out-of-water zip bag. In Japan, fried fish (especially mackerel) is often seen on bar menus, and is prepared by splitting the fish through its stomach and frying it flat. The sight of fried fish is common visual vocabulary in Japan, but Otsuhata was curious about what the fish looked like in its pre-fried state, so she bought one from the grocery store, took photographs, and made it into a zip bag.

Tokyo-based Otsuhata is also a writer for the Japanese website Daily Portal Z, where she often shares her creative process as she explores pop culture and humor. You can see how she made the original fish bag, as well as a pair of pigeon shoes.

Three varieties of Otsuhata’s fish bags—kinme, saury, and sea bream—are available in The Colossal Shop.

 

 

 

 

 



Art

Blooming Metallic Birds and Other Animals by Taiichiro Yoshida

September 28, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Hanasuzume, 2013. Copper.

Artist Taiichiro Yoshida forms the delicate wings of birds and fluffy fur of mammals from a variety of sculpted metal flowers of bronze, copper, or silver. Decorative hot metalworking in Japan is considered an ancient technique, beginning sometime in the 2-3rd century BC. Yoshida achieves the fragile nature of each piece through smithing, where the hot metal is carefully beaten and then formed into blooms before being colored.

You can see more of his work on Artsy. (via Cross Connect, Hi-Fructose)

Fire Bird, 2014. Wood, grass, copper, phosphor bronze, bird’s skull.

 

 



Amazing Photography

Otherworldly ‘Earth Pyramids’ Captured in the Foggy Early Morning Light by Photographer Kilian Schönberger

September 27, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Photographer Kilian Schönberger (previously) climbed the Alps late at night to capture one of the mountain range’s strangest segments, alien-like columns found in South Tyrol, an autonomous province in Northern Italy. His series Otherworld showcases the so-called “earth pyramids” in a hazy dawn light, strange creations that appear like stalagmites freed from their underground caves.

The structures are created by erosion, rising from clay soil left behind by glaciers from the last Ice Age. Each features a large boulder resting on top which protects the soil below. Eventually the tall columns lose the strength to hold the large rock overhead, shifting balance and sending it tumbling down the mountain.

The otherworldly elements remind Schönberger of the hoodos in the Southwestern United States, however the two naturally occurring wonders are formed from two very different geological processes. You can see more of German landscape photographer’s work on his Instagram and Behance  

 

 



Design

A Cascade of Water Over Terra Cotta Tubes Functions as a Beautiful Low-Energy Air Conditioner

September 27, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

New Delhi-based architecture and design company Ant Studio recently created a completely low-energy cooling system that relies on clay tubes and water as a cheap alternative to traditional air conditioners. The spherical system reminiscent of a beehive was built as a part of a larger beautification project for a DEKI Electronics factory. The simple, low-tech solution adds an aesthetic twist to the typical metal appliance, and requires little upkeep to ensure its surroundings stay cool.

In order to cool the air, the system is first packed with a few hundred terra cotta cones. Next, water is poured down the sides of the structure so the clay objects can absorb the liquid as it flows down their sides. Finally the water slowly evaporates from the soaked cones, lowering temperatures around the installation by 6-10 degrees Fahrenheit.

Similar cooling devices have been in use for thousands of years, with archaeological evidence suggesting that clay pots were utilized to assist with water cooling methods as far back as 3000 BC in Pakistan and India. The natural and cheap solution also doubles as an art installation, appearing more like a postmodern waterfall than HVAC system. Although this system relies on electrically pumped water, other versions could function with poured water or a connection to a naturally flowing water source to be truly zero-energy. (via ArchDaily and InHabitat)