Support: Monumental Hands Rise from the Water in Venice to Highlight Climate Change 

Artist Lorenzo Quinn (previously) just finished the installation of a monumental sculpture for the 2017 Venice Biennale. Titled Support, the piece depicts a pair of gigantic hands rising from the water to support the sides of the Ca’ Sagredo Hotel, a visual statement of the impact of climate change and rising sea levels on the historic city. Quinn is known for his work with the human body—specifically hands—that he incorporates into everything from large-scale sculptures down to jewelry designs. Quinn is represented by Halcyon Gallery, and you can see more installation photos and videos of Support on Instagram. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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New Minimalistic Single Line Tattoos by Mo Ganji 

With a single delicate black line, Berlin-based tattoo artist Mo Ganji (previously) creates the faces of intertwined portraits, the details of flying birds, and the forms of running animals. Each tattoo relies on an unbroken line that varies only slightly in thickness as it weaves in and out of each image, sometimes accompanied by a few accent dots. Seen here is a collection of pieces from the last year, and Ganji shares more new works on Instagram.

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Wood Tables and Wall Art Embedded with Glass Rivers and Lakes by Greg Klassen 

Inspired by his daily experience of life in the Pacific Northwest, artist and designer Greg Klassen (previously) fabricates one-of-a-kind tables featuring blue glass rivers, lakes, and waterfalls. The topographical studies mimic bodies of water seen from an aerial view, but the twisting blue pathways are often defined by the wood pieces he selects. While the majority of Klassen’s work serves as functional art, he’s also begun to create more isolated wood and glass sculptures mounted on walls.

Several of Klassen’s most recent tables are available through his online shop, and you can explore more pieces from the last few years on Instagram and Facebook.

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Endangered Species Cut from Paper by Patrick Cabral 

As part of an ongoing series to highlight various endangered species, Manila-based paper artist Patrick Cabral created these amazing cut paper portraits of tigers, pandas, pangolins, and other threatened animals. The multi-layered works are cut by hand and incorporate decorative flourishes and patterns into the the face of each animal. Working since last November, Cabral envisioned the series as a way to support endangered animals, and he’s donating half of the proceeds from the sale of each sculpture to WWF Philippines. You can see more from the series on Instagram.

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How the British Library Digitized One of the World’s Largest Books 

The Klencke Atlas published in 1660 is one of the most famous objects in the British Library's cartographic collection, a towering book that stands nearly 6 feet tall and reaches over seven feet wide when open. For over three centuries the atlas was the largest in existence, surpassed only five years ago by Millennium House's gigantic publication Earth Platinum.

The collection of maps was named after Johannes Klencke (1620-1672), the leader of a collection of Dutch sugar merchants who presented the atlas to Charles II as a hope to gain favorable trade agreements with Britain. The object was subsequently placed amongst the king’s most prized possessions, and stayed tied to royalty for the next 150 years.

“The Klencke atlas is important both in itself, and for its constituent parts,” said Tom Harper, lead curator of antiquarian maps at the British Library in an article about the atlas. “As an object, its scale and conception recalled Renaissance ideas relating to the symbolic power of a book which contained the entire world’s knowledge. It would have provided Charles with intellectual authority, an authority which enforces its intimidating presence even today.”

The Klencke Atlas went on public view in 2010 after considerable restoration, and was digitized by the British Library just last month. It took several hands to transport and mount the ancient work onto an XXXL book stand for high resolution photography, and digitization took several days in order to capture each of the included maps. You can view this online version of the atlas on the British Library’s website, and watch a time-lapse video of the digitization process supported by Daniel Crouch Rare Books. (via Hyperallergic)

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An Elegant Flower Time-Lapse Three Years in the Making 

As a companion piece to his 2012 short film “Fall,” filmmaker Jamie Scott spent the last three years filming a massive variety of flowers in this seemingly endless parade of buds opening into blooms titled “Spring.” The entire film was shot on a small mini-stage inside the wardrobe of his New York home, and the results are stitched together into this seamless time-lapse. The visuals and music were created in tandem with composer Jim Perkins who received edits and wrote the music accordingly. You can learn more about how it was shot over on Fstoppers.

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