Octopi Embedded in Ceramic Vessels by Keiko Masumoto 

Ceramic artist Keiko Masumoto is intensely interested in the intersection of art and craft, whether a craft object can simply be decorative or if an artistic work can still remain functional. Her questions have resulted in a series of traditional ceramic plates, bowls, and vases embedded with unlikely objects from wriggling octopi to entire buildings. You can explore a bit more in her online portfolio and at Spoon & Tamago.

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A Look Inside Europe’s Most Enchanting Libraries by Photographer Thibaud Poirier 

Trinity College Library, Dublin, 1732

Over the last year, photographer Thibaud Poirier has traveled across Europe to photograph some of the world’s most incredible libraries. The series includes both historic and contemporary libraries with a special emphasis on the varied designs employed by architects. Poirier captured each image when the buildings were closed and empty of people to focus entirely on structure and layout. From his statement about the project:

Like fingerprints, each architect crafted his vision for a new space for this sacred self-exploration. These seemingly minute details are everywhere, from the balance of natural and artificial light to optimise reading yet preserve ancient texts to the selective use of studying tables to either foster community or encourage lonely reflection. The selection of these libraries that span space, time, style and cultures were carefully selected for each one’s unique ambiance and architectural contribution.

So far Poirier has photographed 25 libraries and says he intends to add to the series as time permits. If you liked this, also check out his Berlin Interiors series.

Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève, Paris, 1850

Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Salle Labrouste, Paris, 1868

Bibliothèque de l’Hotel de Ville de Paris, Paris, 1890

Grimm Zentrum Library, Berlin, 2009

Stadtbibliothek, Stuttgart, 2011

Bibliothèque de la Sorbonne, Salle Jacqueline de Romilly, Paris, 1897

Biblioteca Joanina, Coimbra, 1728

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Segmented and Compartmentalized Graphite Portraits by Miles Johnston 

The female characters inhabiting the world of London-based illustrator Miles Johnston appear to be undergoing near perpetual transformation, their faces or bodies split in half, or their entire form morphing into globby organic forms. Over the past few years he’s examined four specific transformations organized into series titled Deform, Divide, Attract, and Recur. Johnston will have work on view at the upcoming Small Works exhibition at beinArt Gallery and you can also follow him on Instagram. (via Booooooom, Artnau)

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Polluted Water Popsicles: Faux Frozen Treats Highlight Taiwan’s Water Pollution Problem 

via @bebeelai

via @bebeelai

Focused on environmental change rather than flavor, art students Hung I-chen, Guo Yi-hui, and Cheng Yu-ti from the National Taiwan University of the Arts concocted a line of “frozen treats” titled Polluted Water Popsicles. The group collected polluted water from 100 locations in Taiwan, first freezing the collected sewage samples and then preserving their creations in polyester resin.

At first glance the visually pleasing treats seem to imitate the aesthetic of recent craft and artisanal food trends. However on closed inspection you can identify the trash contained within each mold—bits of plastic, bottle caps, and wrappers lying within the popsicles’ murky waters.

The project is intended to spread awareness about water pollution and its deep effect on our world’s population. The 100 pieces, which also included designed wrappers, was nominated for the Young Pin Design Award and featured in the New Generation of Design Exhibition this May at the Taipei World Trade Center. You can view more of the creatively designed inedible works in the video below. More information about the project can be found on the group’s Facebook. (via Mashable and Quartz)

via @fengfeng210

via @fengfeng210

via @_rokaro_

via @_rokaro_

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Three-Dimensional Landscapes Formed with Layered Acrylic Photographs by Nobuhiro Nakanishi 

© Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Susanne Hakuba

Japanese artist Nobuhiro Nakanishi creates sculptural works that attempt to preserve a singular moment in the natural world, capturing deeply pigmented sunsets and brightly-lit forests in a series he’s titled Layer Drawings. To produce the three-dimensional installations, Nakanishi first photographs an environment over a period of time. He then mounts selected images from his documentation on panels of acrylic in chronological order, allowing slight variation from frame to frame.

“We are all subject to the passing of time, yet each of us feels and perceives it in our own way,” says Nakaniski, “Time itself has no shape or boundary and cannot be fixed or grasped. When we look at the photographs in these sculptures, we attempt to fill in the gaps between the individual images. We draw from our physical experiences to fill in missing time and space, both ephemeral and vague. In this series, I attempt to depict time and space as sensations shared by both viewer and artist.”

Nakaniski is represented by Yukimo Chiba Associates in Tokyo. You can see more of his layered works on his website. (via Tu Recepcja)

Installation view: Transparent view, Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan (2011), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Tadasu Yamamoto, Photo Courtesy: Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan

Installation view: Transparent view, Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan (2011), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Tadasu Yamamoto, Photo Courtesy: Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan

Installation view: Transparent view, Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan (2011), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Tadasu Yamamoto, Photo Courtesy: Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan

Installation view: Saturation, Osaka Contemporary Art Center, Japan
 (2006), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Seiji Toyonaga

Installation view: Saturation, Osaka Contemporary Art Center, Japan 
(2006), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Seiji Toyonaga

Installation view: Saturation, Osaka Contemporary Art Center, Japan 
(2006), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Seiji Toyonaga

© Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Susanne Hakuba

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Lifelike Bird Pins Embroidered by Paulina Bartnik 

Warsaw-based embroidery artist Paulina Bartnik stitches colorfully lifelike brooches of birds and other tiny creatures in a dense style called needle painting. Each object begins as a piece of wool which she prods with a special needle in a process called dry felting which results in a surface ideal for embroidery. She then paints with a needle directly on the felt and embroiders the finer details. You can see more of her creations in her Etsy shop. (via Bored Panda)

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