INKS: Paintball Meets Pinball in a New Videogame from State of Play 

pin-1

For their latest video game INKS, London-based State of Play Games have created a new spin on classic pinball by turning the background of a pinball game into a piece of interactive art. As the ball traverses the course, the bright lights and clanking sounds of traditional pinball are replaced with pockets of watercolor paint that explode into flourishes. The ball in turn leaves trails of color as you solve each level.

State of Play are no strangers to turning a more tactile world into a digital game. You might remember their groundbreaking work in Lumino City (which won a BAFTA award) where real paper sets and characters were filmed and photographed as components of an immersive digital puzzle game. INKS has much of the same polish a detail, though allows for quicker gameplay. One of my favorite details is that every time you complete a level, the game board complete with paint trails is saved as a thumbnail like an artwork. You can even print and share them.

Inspired by artists like Miro, Matisse, Jackson Pollock and Bridget Riley, each table becomes a unique work of art in its own right, sculpted by the player as they fire an ink covered ball around the canvas. The player is encouraged to share their final work of art on social media with the iOS share function. They can even print them out if they like – with the story of their perfect game literally drawn on the canvas in front of them, something to be proud of and share.

Luke Whittaker from State of Play tells us they were partly inspired by Sam van Doom’s ink-based pinball game from 2012. It’s a visually stunning game with some pretty innovative ideas, even if you don’t particularly enjoy pinball. You can download INKS for iOS here.

inks-2

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

The Floor of an Historic Church Transformed Into a Reflective Pool of Multi-Colored Orbs by Liz West 

LizWest_01

All images by Hannah Devereux

Reflecting the architecture of the former St. John’s Church in North Lincolnshire, UK is Liz West‘s site-specific pool of over 700 multi-colored orbs titled “Our Colour Reflection.” These circular mirrors installed onto the floor of the now 20-21 Visual Arts Centre project hues of yellow, purple, red, blue, and 11 other colors onto the beams that surround them, adding a colorful dimension to the 125-year-old building.

“The work changes constantly, depending on what time of day it is,” West told The Creators Project. “As darkness comes, the gallery spotlights reflect off the colored mirrors and send vivid dots of color up into the interior of the former church building, illuminating the neo-Gothic architecture.”

Visitors can peer into the reflective pool to see how it refracts their own image, inserting themselves simultaneously into the history and artistic intervention of the space. The installation is also a reference to stained glass, as West focused on the history of the arts center as a former place of worship before starting the installation. You can catch the multi-colored light refractions of “Our Colour Reflection” through June 25, 2016. (via The Creators Project)

LizWest_06

LizWest_10  LizWest_09

LizWest_04

LizWest_08

LizWest_07

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Site-Specific Elephant Murals on the Streets of South Africa by Falko One 

elef-1

Garies, South Africa. 2015.

Working with the iconic image of the elephant, South African artist Falko One brings lumbering pachyderms to the facades of homes, alleyways, and businesses across the country. The Cape Town-based graffiti artist has been painting murals in the region since 1988, and though he depicts a wide range of subject matter in his artworks, the elephants seem to most easily capture the imagination of the viewer. Many of his site-specific murals incorporate elements of the building or even items far off in the background directly into the painting, creating fun optical illusions. You can follow more of his work on Instagram and on Global Street Art.

elef-2

Kalahari Desert, South Africa.

elef-3

Wesminster, South Africa.

elef-4

South Africa

elef-5

Johannesburg, South Africa

elef-6

Johannesburg, South Africa

elef-7

Karoo, South Africa

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

Sponsor // Sketch Lively Urban Spaces With 50% Off This Online Craftsy Class 

10159_Image

Explore cities and towns through an artist’s eye, and start sketching urban spaces pulsing with energy and movement. Join Urban Sketchers correspondent James Richards, for his online Craftsy class, Essential Techniques for Sketching the Energy of Places. Receive 50% off James’s video lessons — a special, one-week offer for Colossal readers — and capture your favorite urban scenes.

With lifetime access to these video lessons, you can bring vibrant urban scenes to life. James will demonstrate how to quickly draw people in the city, sketch the backdrop elements of an urban scene, and create an illusion of depth. You’ll also discover how to use composition, exaggerated perspective, exciting linework, and bold color to capture the exuberance of great places in your town and around the world!

Visit Craftsy now to get 50% off the online class, Essential Techniques for Sketching the Energy of Places, and enjoy your video lessons risk-free with Craftsy’s full money-back guarantee. Offer expires May 23, 2016 at 11:59pm MT.

Figurative Found Wood Sculptures Pierced with Hundreds of Nails by Jaime Molina 

SONY DSC

Artist Jaime Molina works in 2, 2.5, and 3 dimensions, translating his aesthetic from large-scale paintings to sculptures, while also producing pieces that exist somewhere in-between. In this particular series, Molina has focused on bearded wooden heads, utilizing nails to form the hair of each of his subjects. Despite being placed haphazardly and with alternating sizes, the nails give the sculptures a uniform look, adding dimension to the male heads formed from found wood.

A few of the works open to showcase a center skull, intrinsic sculptures that are either left as raw wood or painted in a similar manner as his public murals. You can see more of the Denver-based artist’s sculptures and murals on his Instagram. (thnx, Laura!)

SONY DSC

SONY DSC

SONY DSC

molina-5

molina-6

molina-7

SONY DSC

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Watch a Restored Victorian-era Drop Candy Maker Crank Out Vintage Confections 

cnady-1

cnady-2

cnady-3

Ever wonder where a Lemon Drop got its name? I always thought it was because of the shape, but it turns out that’s not the case. This video from Florida-based candy shop Public Displays of Confection shows off their painstakingly restored 19th century candy drop maker as they make something called a Nectar Drop. Watch all the way through for the super gratifying end. (via Metafilter)

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Page 14 of 740«...13141516...»