Animal Sculptures Comprised of Densely Rolled Newspaper by Artist Chie Hitotsuyama 

chie-1

Japanese paper artist Chie Hitotsuyama deftly creates textured sculptures of animals using a technique involving rolled strips of wet newspaper. The compact application of each newspaper segment proves to be an elegant method of forming the wild fur of snow monkeys or the density of scales found on the back of an iguana. For Hitotsuyama, these details are critical as she seeks to create the most lifelike sculptures possible.

“More than anything else, I’m particular about the realistic feel of the animals,” she shares with Kokusai Pulp & Paper. “Animals that live in nature are equal to us in the sense that we live together on this planet. Sometimes they sleep. Sometimes they eat. They are living ordinary everyday lives just like us. I would like keep insisting on reality and producing my life-sized work as much as possible in order to convey their lives.”

Hitotsuyama is currently showing several pieces as part of a residency and exhibition at MOAH:CEDAR in Lancaster, California through January 7, 2017. You can watch a video of her at work included below, and see much more on Strictly Paper and on her website.

chie-2

chie-3

chie-4

chie-5

chie-6

chie-7

chie-8

chie-9

chie-10

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Ceramic Mugs That Imitate Used Cardboard by Artist Tim Kowalczyk 

tomkowalczyk_07

Ceramic artist Tim Kowalczyk is drawn to objects of little material value—crushed tin cans, ripped up cardboard, and Polaroids that have been damaged during development. It is in these typical throw aways that he finds beauty, an attraction to the history embedded in their wrinkles and folds. To memorialize these items Kowalczyk creates their likeness in clay, creating works that look exactly like mugs haphazardly formed from cardboard with “Please Handle With Care” stickers still stuck to their sides.

“Ceramic’s ability to replicate any form, texture, or surface is what draws me to the material,” says Kowalczyk in his artist statement. “Replicating real objects out of ceramic material and putting them in a tableau is my version of writing a poem. I am able to sculpt, form, design, and construct sculptures with a sense of purpose, priority, and preciousness.”

The Illinois-based artist graduated with an MFA from Illinois State University in 2011, and is the adjunct Ceramics instructor at Illinois Central in East Peoria, IL. You can see more of his work on his website or at Companion Gallery where he is represented.

tomkowalczyk_06

tomkowalczyk_04

tomkowalczyk_03

tomkowalczyk_02

mug-xtra-1

tomkowalczyk_09

tomkowalczyk_08

poloroids

tomkowalczyk_01

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Artist Thomas Jackson Suspends Swarms of Objects Mid-Air for His “Emergent Behavior” Series 

Cups no. 3, Novato, California, 2014

Cups no. 3, Novato, California, 2014

Photographer Thomas Jackson (previously) is intrigued by the movements and behaviors of swarms, something he seeks to replicate in temporary installations he constructs for the purpose of making a single photo as part of his Emergent Behavior series. From swarming locusts, to schools of fish or flocks of birds, the San Francisco-based artist recreates these self-organizing behaviors with common objects like plastic cups, party streamers, or hula hoops. Each piece is made as seen here using various methods of filament and other hidden structures that hold everything in place for the photograph—nothing is digitally edited and the pieces aren’t being thrown through the air. From his statement about the project:

The images attempt to tap the mixture of fear and fascination that those phenomena tend to evoke, while creating an uneasy interplay between the natural and the manufactured and the real and the imaginary. At the same time, each image is an experiment in juxtaposition. By constructing the installations from unexpected materials and placing them where they seem least to belong, I aim to tweak the margins of our visual vocabulary, and to invite fresh interpretations of everyday things.

Jackson will be showing many images from Emergent Behavior at Miller Yezerski Gallery in Boston starting November 18, 2016.

streamers

Party Streamers no. 2, Tumey Hills, California, 2015

Balloons no. 1, Pescadero, California, 2016

Balloons no. 1, Pescadero, California, 2016

Hula Hoops no. 1, Lee Vining, California, 2015

Hula Hoops no. 1, Lee Vining, California, 2015

Hula Hoops no. 2, Montara, California, 2016

Hula Hoops no. 2, Montara, California, 2016

Glow Necklaces no. 2, Pescadero, California, 2016

Glow Necklaces no. 2, Pescadero, California, 2016

Straws no. 3, San Francisco, California, 2015

Straws no. 3, San Francisco, California, 2015

Take Out Containers no. 1, Montara, California, 2016

Take Out Containers no. 1, Montara, California, 2016

Tutus no. 1, Montara, California, 2016

Tutus no. 1, Montara, California, 2016

See related posts on Colossal about , .

A Volcanic Eruption Photographed Against the Backdrop of the Milky Way, Moon, and a Streaking Meteor 

While photographing the surface flow of a volcano several weeks ago in Hawaii, photographer Mike Mezeul managed to capture an extraordinary number of natural phenomena in this single shot. His original intent was to photograph just the volcano itself, but he soon realized the scene had a bit more potential.

“When I found this surface flow and saw the clouds had cleared out, I knew I needed to at least try to get the stars above with the lava,” he tells Colossal. “As twilight faded, I saw that the position of the moon—which was just a sliver—was to the right of the Milky Way so I figured what the heck, might as well try to get the Milky Way with the lava.” After only three shots another fortuitous event occurred: a meteor just happened to streak across the sky.

For the skeptics, Mezeul shares that he used a Nikon D810 with a Nikon 14-24mm lens, with the following settings: F2.8, ISO 2500, 25″ exposure. You can see more of his landscape work on Instagram. (via PetaPixel)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

The Absurdly Elongated Sculptural Objects of the Dufala Brothers 

shoe

Special Air Mission 2800

dufala-1-new

Lock and Key, 2010. Master locks, brass. Photo by Claire Iltis.

The Dufala Brothers have a knack for the surreal, creating modern objects that have been elongated and stretched into abstract versions of shoes, household appliances, and tools. The creative works mimic the original objects so well that it is difficult to separate the two in one’s mind, such as a Chuck Taylor that is made so long it folds on top of oneself, and a lock made for a key that is four times the standard size.

The Philadelphia duo explore this exaggerated scale with humor, utilizing a variety of media such as sculpture, theater, performance, digital media, and drawing in their combined practice. Both graduated from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and are represented by Fleisher/Ollman Gallery in Philadelphia where they currently reside. You can see more of the pair’s absurd works on their website. (via postmodern.jpg & thnx, Tim!)

dufala-2

Special Air Mission 2800

dufala-3

Long Chuck

Step Broom

Step Broom

Special Air Mission 2800, 2009. Rubber, vinyl, shoelaces. 6 x 4 x 32"

Special Air Mission 2800, 2009. Rubber, vinyl, shoelaces. 6 x 4 x 32″

dufala-6

Hammer with Oversized Handle

Hammer with Oversized Handle

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Floral Anatomy Embroideries by InherentlyRandom [updated] 

emb-1

Adelaide-based InherentlyRandom merges skulls and bones with bursts of embroidered flowers embedded inside rib cages and eye sockets. The embroideries were inspired in part by artist Trisha Thompson Adams who has created paintings with similar designs and motifs.

Update: This post was updated 10/19/2016 to clarify the embroidery design was inspired by Trisha Thompson Adams.

emb-3

emb-2

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Page 14 of 782«...13141516...»