Wink Space: An Immersive Kaleidoscopic Mirror Tunnel Inside a Shipping Container

Wink Space: An Immersive Kaleidoscopic Mirror Tunnel Inside a Shipping Container zippers mirrors installation architecture

Wink Space: An Immersive Kaleidoscopic Mirror Tunnel Inside a Shipping Container zippers mirrors installation architecture

Wink Space: An Immersive Kaleidoscopic Mirror Tunnel Inside a Shipping Container zippers mirrors installation architecture

Wink Space: An Immersive Kaleidoscopic Mirror Tunnel Inside a Shipping Container zippers mirrors installation architecture

Wink Space: An Immersive Kaleidoscopic Mirror Tunnel Inside a Shipping Container zippers mirrors installation architecture

Wink Space: An Immersive Kaleidoscopic Mirror Tunnel Inside a Shipping Container zippers mirrors installation architecture

For the 2013 KOBE Biennale artists and designers were invited to create environments inside industrial shipping containers as part of the ‘Art in a Container International Competition.’ Designers Masakazu Shirane and Saya Miyazaki created Wink Space, a modular installation made from mirrors that formed a giant kaleidoscopic tunnel. Not only was the piece an fun immersive environment, but it was also an experiment in building with zippers. “We wanted to create the world’s first zipper architecture. In other words, this polyhedron is completely connected by zippers. And in order to facilitate even more radical change some of the surfaces open and close like windows,” says Shirane.

Wink Space was a winner of the A’Design Award, and you can see more behind the scenes photos here. (via Spoon & Tamago)

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3D Calligraphy by Tolga Girgin

3D Calligraphy by Tolga Girgin typography calligraphy

3D Calligraphy by Tolga Girgin typography calligraphy

I just stumbled onto the Instagram account of Tolga Girgin, a Turkish graphic designer and electrical engineer who experiments with calligraphy. His latest pieces involve a number of 3D lettering pieces that use shadow and perspective to make it appear like the letterforms are lifting off the page. Very cool.

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Extraordinary Scenes Hand-Cut from Rice Paper by Bovey Lee

Extraordinary Scenes Hand Cut from Rice Paper by Bovey Lee paper

Extraordinary Scenes Hand Cut from Rice Paper by Bovey Lee paper

Extraordinary Scenes Hand Cut from Rice Paper by Bovey Lee paper

Extraordinary Scenes Hand Cut from Rice Paper by Bovey Lee paper

Extraordinary Scenes Hand Cut from Rice Paper by Bovey Lee paper

Extraordinary Scenes Hand Cut from Rice Paper by Bovey Lee paper

Extraordinary Scenes Hand Cut from Rice Paper by Bovey Lee paper

Extraordinary Scenes Hand Cut from Rice Paper by Bovey Lee paper

Extraordinary Scenes Hand Cut from Rice Paper by Bovey Lee paper

Extraordinary Scenes Hand Cut from Rice Paper by Bovey Lee paper

Extraordinary Scenes Hand Cut from Rice Paper by Bovey Lee paper

Extraordinary Scenes Hand Cut from Rice Paper by Bovey Lee paper

Using large thin sheets of Chinese rice paper, artist Bovey Lee (previously) meticulously cuts intricate scenes of plants, roads, people, and architecture with an impressive array of cutting implements. The near weightless artworks are mounted against silk before being hung on gallery walls.

Lee most recently had work on view with Grotto Fine Art as part of Art Basel in Hong Kong, as well as an exhibition with Gavlak Gallery for the Armory Show earlier this year. You can see many more pieces from the last few years in her online cut paper gallery. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

North Carolina-based artist Yumi Okita creates beautiful textile sculptures of months, butterflies, and other insects with various textiles and embroidery techniques. The pieces are quite large, measuring nearly a foot wide and contain other flourishes including painting, feathers, and artificial fur. You can many of her most recent pieces here. (via the Jealous Curator)

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Since the 1970s a Man Has Been Planting a Forest Larger than Central Park, One Tree at a Time

Since the 1970s a Man Has Been Planting a Forest Larger than Central Park, One Tree at a Time trees nature India global warming forests environment

Since the 1970s a Man Has Been Planting a Forest Larger than Central Park, One Tree at a Time trees nature India global warming forests environment

Since the 1970s a Man Has Been Planting a Forest Larger than Central Park, One Tree at a Time trees nature India global warming forests environment

Since the 1970s a Man Has Been Planting a Forest Larger than Central Park, One Tree at a Time trees nature India global warming forests environment

Nestled in Northeast India next to the Brahmaputra River sits Majuli Island, a giant sandbar that happens to be the largest river island on Earth, home to some 150,000 people. It is also the location of the 1,360 acre Molai Forest, one of the most unusual woodlands in the world for the incredible fact that it was planted by a single man. Since 1979, forestry worker Jadav Payeng has dedicated his life to planting trees on the island, creating a forest that has surpassed the scale of New York’s Central Park.

While home to such a large population, rapidly increasing erosion over the last 100 years has reduced the land mass of Majuli Island to less than half. Spurred by the dire situation, Payeng transformed himself into a modern day Johnny Appleseed and singlehandedly planted thousands upon thousands of plants, including 300 hectares of bamboo.

Payeng’s work has been credited with significantly fortifying the island, while providing a habitat for several endangered animals which have returned to the area; a herd of nearly 100 elephants (which has now given birth to an additional ten), Bengal tigers, and a species of vulture that hasn’t been seen on the island in over 40 years. Gives you more than a little hope for the world, doesn’t it?

Filmmaker William Douglas McMaster recently wrote and directed this beautiful documentary short titled Forest Man from the perspective of Payeng’s friend, photographer Jitu Kalita. The project was funded in part last year through Kickstarter. The video is a bit longer than what we usually see here on Colossal, but completely worth your time. (via Gizmodo)

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Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions
Jo Fitzpatrick‎

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions

UK sculptor Robin Wight creates dramatic scenes of wind-blown fairies clutching dandelions, clinging to trees, and seemingly suspended in midair, all with densely wrapped forms of stainless steel wire. The artist currently has several pieces on view at the Trentham Gardens and sells a number of DIY wire sculpting kits from his website where he also discusses in great detail how each piece is built. See more over on Facebook. (via Reddit).

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Artist Recreates Childhood Scribbles as Digital Illustrations Over 20 Years Later

Artist Recreates Childhood Scribbles as Digital Illustrations Over 20 Years Later   kids illustration humor

Artist Recreates Childhood Scribbles as Digital Illustrations Over 20 Years Later   kids illustration humor

Artist Recreates Childhood Scribbles as Digital Illustrations Over 20 Years Later   kids illustration humor

Artist Recreates Childhood Scribbles as Digital Illustrations Over 20 Years Later   kids illustration humor

Artist Recreates Childhood Scribbles as Digital Illustrations Over 20 Years Later   kids illustration humor

Artist Recreates Childhood Scribbles as Digital Illustrations Over 20 Years Later   kids illustration humor

Artist Recreates Childhood Scribbles as Digital Illustrations Over 20 Years Later   kids illustration humor

Here on Colossal we’ve seen an artist who collaborated with her 4-year-old daughter, transforming her random sketches and scribbles into fully realized artworks. With another take on the child/adult collaborative art genre, Dutch muralist Telmo Pieper did something similar, instead collaborating with his 4-year-old self in his series called Kiddie Arts. The artist took old childhood sketches which he then recreated as digital illustrations by applying realistic light, color, and texture to the hilariously deformed shapes he imagined in his youth.

You can see much more of Pieper’s work on his website and Tumblr. He also collaborates with artist Miel Krutzmann as part of Telmo Miel out of Rotterdam. (via Bored Panda, Laughing Squid)

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