Coffee Stain Motorcycle Drawings by Carter Asmann

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Mixed in with photographs of his scenic surroundings in Encinitas, California, artist and illustrator Carter Asmann shares whimsical interpretations of coffee stains on his Instagram account. Among his most impressive pieces are his graphite drawings of motorcycles and other vehicles that rest on drippy caffeinate circles. The contrast of his detailed renderings with the sloppy coffee tires never seems to get old. You can see more here, and coincidentally, illustrator Oliver Jeffers shared some of his own coffee stain drawings just yesterday. (via Booooooom)

Comical Portraits of Hairless Dogs by Sophie Gamand

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Prophecy is the latest dog portraiture project from New York-based photographer Sophie Gamand (previously) that examines the extremely strange and comical appearance of various hairless dogs. Gamand worked mostly with two types of dogs, the Chinese Crested and the Xoloitzcuintli (commonly the Mexican hairless dog), breeds that archaeologists have dated as being more than 3,000 years old. From her statement about Prophecy:

The physical qualities of hairless dogs and the mystery surrounding them inspired me to create a gallery of faces like old wise men or philosophers, shamans from a different era, maybe a different universe. Gamand imagined her models as prophets or mad scientists, grabbing us and planting their eyes deep into ours, shaking us and shouting, as Philippus the Prophet in The Adventures of Tintin would: “The judgment is upon you! The end is near!” Nature looking straight at us and begging us to repent.

The series includes some 20 individual portraits, many more of which you can see on her website.

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Poetic Acrylic Paintings by Duy Huynh

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Vietnamese born artist Duy Huynh creates poetic acrylic paintings inspired by stories drawn from ancient folklore, comic books, film, and music. After moving to the United States as a child in the early 80s he took refuge in art as he struggled with language barriers and his new surroundings. Themes of cultural and geographical displacement frequently appear in Huynh’s work, including what he describes as “attempts to literally and symbolically connect fluid patterns in nature/wildlife with that of human made aspiration.” He currently has many original works available through Lark & Key Gallery, and you can see more in his archives. (via Cross Connect)

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Behind the Scenes of Elgin Park, a Retro City of Optical Illusions Photographed by Michael Paul Smith

Here at Colossal we’ve long been fans of photographer Michael Paul Smith whose broad life experiences lead him to the creation of Elgin Park, a fictional 20th century town filled with miniature 1/24th-scale models of cars and buildings. Smith mixes his carefully crafted model sets with die-cut automobiles and real-life backdrops, taking advantage of an optical illusion known as forced perspective. The photos have been a massive hit with the internet, racking up over 70 million views on his Flickr account alone.

Smith recently sat down with documentary director and producer Danny Yourd of Animal to discuss his significant personal challenges and life experiences that are now the driving force behind his photography. This is a must-watch for any creative grappling with aspects of identity or personal history in their artwork. He’s is also on the verge of publishing a new book, Elgin Park, which is available now for preorder. Seen here are some of his most recent photos along with behind-the-scenes views, there’s much more over on Flickr. (via PetaPixel)

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Kinetic ‘Insecta’ Lamps by U-Ram Choe

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Silver Insecta Lamp, 2013. Metallic material, machinery, electronic device (cpu board, motor, led), resin, magnet. 16 1/2 × 9 1/10 × 14 3/5 in. Courtesy of the artist and GALLERY HYUNDAI, Seoul.

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Gold Insecta Lamp, 2013. Metallic material, machinery, electronic device (cpu board, motor, led), resin, magnet. 16 1/2 × 9 1/10 × 14 3/5 in. Courtesy of the artist and GALLERY HYUNDAI, Seoul.

Korean sculptor U-Ram Choe (previously) builds kinetic sculptures embedded with CPUs, motors, and LEDs that appear to be equal parts organism and artwork. Seen here are two of his smallest works to date, a pair of insect-like lamps aptly titled Silver Insecta Lamp and Gold Insecta Lamp. When switched on, the lamps reveal an ornate set of five wing-like appendages that cycle through a gentle flapping motion. You can see how they work in the video above. All photos courtesy Gallery Hyundai. (via Artsy)

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A Custom-Blown Pint Glass Featuring a 3D Model of Oregon’s Tallest Peak

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Mt. Hood is Oregon’s highest peak, clocking in at 11,250 feet. North Drinkware, a team of Oregon-based glass blowers decided to commemorate this prominent landmark and immortalize it in glass by creating a 3D model of the peak that’s integrated into the base. Working from topographically accurate data obtained from the Using United States Geological Survey (USGS), the team hand-blows each glass and incorporates the model “so your beer cascades around the mountain when you pour it into the glass.”

Mt. Hood is visible up to 100 miles away, which helps to explain the affinity that many working and living in Oregon feel towards the peak. “We have a really strong connection with the mountains,” says one of the creators. “We stare at them, we play on them and we identify with them.” That’s what led North Drinkware to embark on a path to creating a glass that embodies a connection with Mt. Hood. The Oregon Pint brings technology, a sense of place and old world craftsmanship together. You can order your own glass on Kickstarter, where the company has recently launched a campaign to fund their first creation. (via Laughing Squid)

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Elkebana: Symmetrical Flower Wall Trophies Inspired by Japanese ‘Ikebana’ Flower Arrangements

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If you enjoy the aesthetic appeal of animal antlers but hate the idea of taxidermy, Elkebana might be just the thing for your cabin walls. The wall-mounted system relies on symmetrical sets of flowers or tree branches and gets its name from ikebana, the Japanese art of flower arrangement. You can see more over on their website. (via Colossal Submissions)

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