Florian Pucher Turns Aerial Photos into Plush Carpeting

Florian Pucher Turns Aerial Photos into Plush Carpeting carpets aerial

LANDCARPET Bahamas

Florian Pucher Turns Aerial Photos into Plush Carpeting carpets aerial

LANDCARPET Bahamas (detail)

Florian Pucher Turns Aerial Photos into Plush Carpeting carpets aerial

LANDCARPET Bahamas (detail)

Florian Pucher Turns Aerial Photos into Plush Carpeting carpets aerial

LANDCARPET Hong Kong

Florian Pucher Turns Aerial Photos into Plush Carpeting carpets aerial

LANDCARPET Hong Kong (detail)

Florian Pucher Turns Aerial Photos into Plush Carpeting carpets aerial

LANDCARPET Hong Kong (detail)

Florian Pucher Turns Aerial Photos into Plush Carpeting carpets aerial

LANDCARPET Netherlands (detail)

Florian Pucher Turns Aerial Photos into Plush Carpeting carpets aerial

LANDCARPET Netherlands (detail)

Florian Pucher Turns Aerial Photos into Plush Carpeting carpets aerial

LANDCARPET USA

Florian Pucher Turns Aerial Photos into Plush Carpeting carpets aerial

LANDCARPET USA (detail)

From a young age Florian Pucher was always fascinated by landscapes underneath and how blissful and beautiful our world looks from above. “I have always loved to travel and tried to always get window seats on planes,” said the Beijing-based Austrian architect who even avoided travelling by night in order to see as many different landscapes as possible. Pucher is now turning his childhood obsession into LANDCARPET: a series of rugs modeled after birds-eye-view aerial photographs of land.

Pucher uses various online mapping services to pinpoint locations of interest and then does picture searches to get a feel for the colors and elevations. He sometimes coincidentally will stumble upon satellite imagery or maps, which may lead to a new rug design. “Some countries are very easily recognizable through their methods of farming and that has always intrigued me,” Pucher tells us. “Furthermore as an architect and master planner I constantly get to see and look through site surveys, aerial images and city plans which have further sharpened my eye for distinguishable patterns and different layers.”

Pucher’s LANDCARPETs are signed and hand tufted in limited editions of 88 pieces. You can purchase one directly through his website. (via Yatzer)

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Medieval Book Historian Erik Kwakkel Discovers and Catalogs 800-Year-Old Doodles in Some of the World’s Oldest Books

Medieval Book Historian Erik Kwakkel Discovers and Catalogs 800 Year Old Doodles in Some of the Worlds Oldest Books books
Doodle by bored medieval school boy. A 15th-century doodle in the lower margin of a manuscript containing Juvenal’s Satires, a popular classical text used to teach young children about morals. Photo: Carpentras, Bibliothèque municipale, MS 368.

For the past few years, medieval book historian Erik Kwakkel has been poring over some of the world’s oldest books and manuscripts at Leiden University, The Netherlands, as part of his ongoing research on pen trials. Pen trials are small sketches, doodles, and practice strokes a medieval scribe would make while testing the ink flow of a pen or quill. They usually involve funny faces, letter strokes, random lines, or geometric shapes and generally appear in the back of the book where a few blank pages could be found. Kwakkel shares via email:

From a book historical perspective pen trials are interesting because a scribe tends to write them in his native hand. Sometimes, when they moved to a different writing culture (another country or religious house) they adapted their writing style accordingly when copying real text—books. The trials, however, are done in the style of the region they were trained in, meaning the individuals give some information about themselves away.

In some sense, these sketches are like fingerprints or signatures, little clues that reveal a bit about these long forgotten scribes who copied texts but who had no real opportunity to express themselves while working. Including additional sketches or even initials in these books was often forbidden.

While many of Kwakkel’s discoveries are standard pen trials, other doodles he finds relate to a human concept as universal as topics discussed in these 13th and 14th century books such as love, morals, or religion. Specifically: boredom. It seems the tedium of reading through a philosophy textbook or law manuscript dates back to the very invention of books. Some of these scribbles were even made hundreds of years after a book’s publication, suggesting no margin is sacred when monotony is concerned.

Medieval Book Historian Erik Kwakkel Discovers and Catalogs 800 Year Old Doodles in Some of the Worlds Oldest Books books

Medieval Book Historian Erik Kwakkel Discovers and Catalogs 800 Year Old Doodles in Some of the Worlds Oldest Books books
Medieval smiley face. Conches, Bibliothèque municipale, MS 7 (main text 13th century, doodle 14th or 15th century).

Medieval Book Historian Erik Kwakkel Discovers and Catalogs 800 Year Old Doodles in Some of the Worlds Oldest Books books
Doodle discovered in a 13th-century law manuscript (Amiens BM 347).

Medieval Book Historian Erik Kwakkel Discovers and Catalogs 800 Year Old Doodles in Some of the Worlds Oldest Books books
Students with pointy noses. Leiden, University Library, MS BPL 6 C (13th century).

Medieval Book Historian Erik Kwakkel Discovers and Catalogs 800 Year Old Doodles in Some of the Worlds Oldest Books books
Leiden, Universiteitsbibliotheek, BPL MS 111 I, 14th-century doodle.

Medieval Book Historian Erik Kwakkel Discovers and Catalogs 800 Year Old Doodles in Some of the Worlds Oldest Books books
Leiden UB VLQ 92

Medieval Book Historian Erik Kwakkel Discovers and Catalogs 800 Year Old Doodles in Some of the Worlds Oldest Books books
Medieval scribes tested their pens by writing short sentences and drawing doodles. The pen trials above are from Oxford, Bodleian Library, Lat. misc. c. 66 (15th century).

Lucky for us, Kwakkel has left a trail of ancient doodle discoveries all across the web on his Twitter account, his Tumblr, and on his recently established blog medievalbooks. His obsession with margin minutiae has lead to two scholarly publications and also caught the interest of NPR’s ‘How to Do Everything‘ who interviewed him last week. All images courtesy Erik Kwakkel, respective of noted libraries.

See related posts on Colossal about .

The Sounds of Aerobatic Paragliding

The Sounds of Aerobatic Paragliding stunts sound paragliding

First: put on your headphones or turn up the volume, otherwise the beauty of this clip might be lost. Sounds of Paragliding is a new video from director Shams (previously), and sound engineer Thibaut Darscotte who took special equipment into the skies above France to record the sounds of Théo de Blic’s aerobatic paragliding. Instead of amping up the music and intensity like so many high-speed stunt/wingsuit/skydiving videos these days, Shams instead slows everything down to focus on only the sounds created by Blic’s parasail whipping through the air at incredible speed. It doesn’t really get going until after 2:00, but is completely worth it.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Digital Artist Giuseppe Randazzo Creates Elaborate Arrays of 3D-Printed Stones

Digital Artist Giuseppe Randazzo Creates Elaborate Arrays of 3D Printed Stones rocks digital 3d printing
Stone Field 00 / exp00 – simple attractor exponential field. Digital rendering.

Digital Artist Giuseppe Randazzo Creates Elaborate Arrays of 3D Printed Stones rocks digital 3d printing
Stone Field 05 / three attractors field. Digital rendering.

Digital Artist Giuseppe Randazzo Creates Elaborate Arrays of 3D Printed Stones rocks digital 3d printing
Stone Field 04 / field based on vert dist from horizontal axis. Digital rendering.

Digital Artist Giuseppe Randazzo Creates Elaborate Arrays of 3D Printed Stones rocks digital 3d printing
StoneFields 02 / polar 2d Perlin field. 3D-printed sculpture.

Digital Artist Giuseppe Randazzo Creates Elaborate Arrays of 3D Printed Stones rocks digital 3d printing
Stone Field 00 / exp00 – simple attractor exponential field. 3D-printed sculpture.

Digital Artist Giuseppe Randazzo Creates Elaborate Arrays of 3D Printed Stones rocks digital 3d printing
Stone Field 07 /simple 1d linear polar field. 3D-printed sculpture.

Digital Artist Giuseppe Randazzo Creates Elaborate Arrays of 3D Printed Stones rocks digital 3d printing
Stone Field 07 /simple 1d linear polar field. 3D-printed sculpture, detail.

Back in 2009, Italian designer Giuseppe Randazzo of Novastructura released a series of generative digital “sculptures” that depicted carefully organized pebbles and rocks on a flat plane. Titled Stone Fields, the works were inspired in part by similar land art pieces by English sculptor Richard Long. As the images spread around the web (pre-dating this publication entirely) many people were somewhat disheartened to learn the images were created with software instead of tweezers, a testament to Randazzo’s C++ programming skills used to create a custom application that rendered 3D files based on a number of parameters.

Fast forward to 2014, and technology has finally caught up with Randazzo’s original vision. The designer recently teamed up with Shapeways to create physical prototypes of the Stone Fields project. He shares about the process:

Starting from 2009 project “Stone Fields”, some 3dmodels were produced from the original meshes. The conversion was rather difficult, the initial models weren’t created with 3dprinting in mind. The handling of millions of triangles and the check for errors required a complex process. Each model is 25cm x 25cm wide and was produced by Shapeways in polyamide (white strong & flexible). Subsequently they were painted with airbrush. […] The minute details of the original meshes were by far too tiny to be printed, however despite the small scale, these prototypes give an idea of the complexity of the gradients of artificial stones.

Watch the video above to see the sculptures up close, and you can see a few more photos over on Randazzo’s project site. If you liked this, also check out Lee Griggs.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

New Anatomical Collages by Travis Bedel

New Anatomical Collages by Travis Bedel  collage anatomy

New Anatomical Collages by Travis Bedel  collage anatomy

New Anatomical Collages by Travis Bedel  collage anatomy

New Anatomical Collages by Travis Bedel  collage anatomy

New Anatomical Collages by Travis Bedel  collage anatomy

New Anatomical Collages by Travis Bedel  collage anatomy

New Anatomical Collages by Travis Bedel  collage anatomy

New Anatomical Collages by Travis Bedel  collage anatomy

New Anatomical Collages by Travis Bedel  collage anatomy

Collage artist Travis Bedel (previously) continues to make intriguing collages with imagery acquired from field guides, textbooks, and vintage etchings. Bedel, who works under the moniker Bedelgeuese, makes both physical and digital collages that form a wild amalgamation of botanical, zoological, and anatomical imagery. For the sake of context it’s important to note that Bedel’s work follows in the same vein as Argentinian art director and designer Juan Gatti who translated his love for gardening and the human form into similar collage work over the last few decades. Almost all of Bedel’s pieces are available as prints.

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Animated Cinemagraphs of City Life and Nature by Julien Douvier

Animated Cinemagraphs of City Life and Nature by Julien Douvier gifs

Animated Cinemagraphs of City Life and Nature by Julien Douvier gifs

Animated Cinemagraphs of City Life and Nature by Julien Douvier gifs

Animated Cinemagraphs of City Life and Nature by Julien Douvier gifs

Animated Cinemagraphs of City Life and Nature by Julien Douvier gifs

Animated Cinemagraphs of City Life and Nature by Julien Douvier gifs

Animated Cinemagraphs of City Life and Nature by Julien Douvier gifs

Animated Cinemagraphs of City Life and Nature by Julien Douvier gifs

Strasbourg-based photographer Julien Douvier utlilizes a variety of techniques to create these beautifully meditative cinemagraphs of urban life and nature. He films and edits every image with an obsessive attention to detail, a fact not lost on several fashion clients that have commissioned Douvier to bring their brands to life recently. You can follow more of his personal and commerical work on Tumblr and on Behance. (via Designtaxi, Ignant)

See related posts on Colossal about .

Sponsored // Get Craftsy’s Free Guide to Understanding Exposure for Better Photos

Are your photos not turning out the way you want? Learn the tricks to getting the best shots when you download Craftsy’s free guide to Understanding Exposure.

In this printable primer, award-winning photographer Nick Donner reveals how to master shutter speed, aperture, ISO, exposure and depth of field. Featuring step-by-step tutorials, helpful tips and photos, this must-have guide will improve your photography today.

Get the free guide to Understanding Exposure at Craftsy.com. Sponsored // Get Craftsys Free Guide to Understanding Exposure for Better Photos sponsor

Page 14 of 497«...13141516...»