Custom Glass Planets Containing the Cremated Remains of Loved Ones

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Merry Coor produces ethereal designs from cremated remains within custom glass beads. Coor crafts each bead by hand, first melting glass into a round bead, then spiraling the design out of ashes on top, and finally sealing the design with an outer layer of clear glass. For each bead she not only requests a 1/2 teaspoon of ashes, but also a picture, letter, or story of the deceased so she can develop a personal connection while forming the piece of jewelry.

Coor has been making glass beads for about 15 years, but it wasn’t until last year that she began incorporating ashes into their designs. After this development Coor explained, “My bead making now gave me a new purpose, and a way to honor others, both living and passed.”

Custom beads can be requested by the California-based artist either through her company’s website, Ash Beads, or through her Etsy. (via Laughing Squid, Bored Panda)

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Hyperrealistic Depictions of a Fictional Mouse-Butterfly Species by Lisa Ericson

“Bliss”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 11″x14″

“Bliss”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 11″x 14″

“Perch”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 9″x12″

“Perch”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 9″x 12″

“Gatherer II”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 8″x10″

“Gatherer II”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 8″x 10″

"Gatherer I", Acrylic on Wood Panel, 8″x10″

“Gatherer I”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 8″x 10″

“Hover”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 13″x16″

“Hover”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 13″x 16″

“Artista”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 16″x16″

“Artista”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 16″x 16″

Lisa Ericson‘s logo is just as enchanting as her hyperrealistic paintings, a tiny mouse with butterfly wings floating between her first and last name. Ericson works as a multi-hyphenate, utilizing her visual talents as an artist, illustrator, and designer to craft meaningful images for both her client and personal practice.

In her newest series Ericson skillfully depicts her invented species of mouse-butterfly while they explore environments filled with detailed mushrooms, forgotten tin jars, and forest brush while sometimes clutching found objects such as acorns and raspberries.

Ericson’s first exhibition, and one featuring this series, is displayed at Portland’s Antler Gallery alongside Heiko Müller and John Casey until April, 27th. During my research I also learned that Ericson illustrated Ramona Ausubel’s website (one of my favorite contemporary authors), and can be seen here. (via This Isn’t Happiness, Hi-Fructose)

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Sponsor // Learn to Draw the Human Body with a Free Guide From Craftsy

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Since antiquity, capturing the complexities of human anatomy has been a core ambition for artists. Boost your ability to depict the human form with the Craftsy’s free guide, Drawing the Human Body: A Primer.

In this exclusive, 23-page guide, professional artists Sandrine Pelissier and Paul Heaston offer tutorials and tips that will help you draw people with clarity and accuracy. Discover foundational techniques, before you move on to tutorials for drawing the feet, torso, and hands, with realistic anatomy and proportions. You’ll also get advice for making the most out of life drawing sessions, as well as for finding and working with models.

Download the free guide, Drawing the Human Body: A Primer, and start drawing more impactful portraits.

A Black and Blue Life: A Coal Miner Becomes a Photographer of Exquisite Waves and Seascapes

Convection - Ray Collins

Australian photographer Ray Collins first picked up a camera in 2007 and used it to photograph his friends surfing around his home after long shifts working in a nearby coal mine. His attention quickly shifted from his friends to patterns and forms he noticed in the waves. Collins, who is colorblind, was also drawn to the interplay of light and water, perhaps more attune to contrast than the nuance of color. He poetically refers to this switch from coal miner to fine art photographer as a balance between his “black life and blue life.”

The accolades, awards, and sponsorships have been heaped on Collins leading to the publication of his first book, Found at Sea, he also has a wide variety of prints on his website, and you can follow his photography day-to-day on Instagram. (via Laughing Squid)

Underwater - Ray Collins

Fury - Ray Collins

Ominous - Ray Collins

Beneath The Vortex - Ray Collins

Viscous  - Ray Collins

Ripples - Ray Collins

Rainbow - Ray Collins

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Sunburst - Ray Collins

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The Ballad of Holland Island House: An Animated Short Created by Painting with Clay on Glass

Built in the late 1880s, Holland Island House was the last surviving structure on an rapidly eroding island in the Chesapeake Bay. The island’s inhabitants were forced from the island in the 1920s, but this one Victorian structure stood for decades as the land around it disappeared. After numerous attempts to save it, the house finally collapsed into the ocean in October of 2010.

In her stop-motion short The Ballad of Holland Island House, animator Lynn Tomlinson shares the story of the house through an innovative clay-on-glass animation technique. Every single frame was painted by hand with clay and photographed, a medium that lends itself perfectly to depicting ocean currents, memory, and the passage of time. Music by Anna & Elizabeth.

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Delicate Pressed Fern Leaf Illustrations by Helen Ahpornsiri

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Artist and illustrator Helen Ahpornsiri creates incredible pressed fern illustrations from her studio in East Sussex. Tiny bits of stems and leaves are arranged on paper to create butterflies, dragonflies, and birds scarcely larger than a coin. Many of her pieces are available as prints on Etsy (along with a few originals), and you can also follow her on Instagram. (via The Kid Should See This)

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Drawings in Space: Wooden Wireframe Sculptures of Everyday Objects by Janusz Grünspek

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With little more than thin wooden dowels and a bit of glue, artist Janusz Grünspek creates scale replicas of everyday objects that from a distance appear like line drawings. Dining room tables, power tools, an Apple laptop, and even a candle chandelier are formed from delicately cut and bent wooden pieces that mimic the form of digitally-rendered wireframes. Grünspek calls the 2011 series Drawings in Space, and you can see a bit more on his website (warning: Flash). (via Junk Culture, Visual News)

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