Art

Sledgehammers and High Heels Find a Modern Pairing in Kelly Reemtsen’s New Paintings

November 15, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Painter Kelly Reemtsen (previously) paints images of anonymous women in thick impasto. The pieces juxtapose high fashion with tools and other construction equipment, placing sequenced high heels alongside sledgehammers and hefty axes. The colorfully painted works are Reemtsen’s comment on modern femininity. By placing tools in each of her subjects’ hands, the LA-based artist showcases that having feminine identification doesn’t mean fitting into a predetermined role.

Reemtsen is represented by Detroit-based David Klein Gallery and Lyndsey Ingram in London. You can view more of her fashionably dressed subjects on her website.

 

 



Art Illustration

Watercolor Illustrations That Trace the Dark and Light Elements of Storybook Myths by Amber Ma

November 15, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

New York-based artist and illustrator Amber Ma subtly integrates elements of darkness into her fantasy-based illustrations. Her inspirations are grounded in childhood stories, such as her series Pinocchio Forest which visually investigates the myth surrounding the storybook puppet’s long nose. In the series of watercolor and sumi ink works Ma mixes elements of tension and warmth. This contrast interrogates the notion of a lie, presenting how the action can both hurt and protect those closest to us.

Ma received both her BFA and MFA in Illustration from the School of the Visual Arts. This fall she was included in the group exhibition Parallel at Light Grey Art Lab in Minneapolis. You can view more of the illustrator’s work on her Instagram and Behance.

 

 



Craft Design

Laminated Jewelry Crafted from Vintage Books by Jeremy May

November 14, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

New work from literary jeweler Jeremy May (previously) transforms the dense layers of books into jewelry that carries the words within each individual, wearable form. Littlefly, his line of rings, necklaces, bracelets, and earrings, reinstalls the finished jewelry in the book that it was originally extracted from, but each piece also has a life of its own with abstract patterns and sculptural shapes.

 

 



Art

Liquid Gold Appears to Flow, Drip, and Drain Through Galleries by Vanderlei Lopes

November 13, 2017

Christopher Jobson

In this ongoing body of sculptural works, Brazillian artist Vanderlei Lopes creates temporary interventions where his polished brass objects appear to pour and drain like gold from the walls or floors of galleries. Much of Lopes’ work plays with aspects of transformation, be it through the tension of liquid and solid forms seen here, by subtraction, or experimenting with orientation. You can see much more of his work on Artsy and Athena Contemporânea.

 

 



Art

Temporal Floral Structures Formed From Unfired Clay by Phoebe Cummings

November 13, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist Phoebe Cummings works primarily with unfired clay to create floral arrangements that are both performative and temporal. The malleable sculptures last only as long as the exhibition, and are made on-site to specifically respond to their temporary environment. The works’ forms are inspired by the natural world as well as botanical illustrations, yet their colors remain the monochromatic shade of raw clay.

The UK-based artist studied Three-Dimensional Crafts at the University of Brighton, and completed her MA in Ceramics & Glass at the Royal College of Art in 2005. Cummings has participated in several residencies across the UK and USA, including the Kohler Co. factory in Wisconsin and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. Cummings was just awarded the BBC Radio 4 Woman’s Hour Craft Prize, in partnership with the Victoria & Albert Museum and the Crafts Council. You can take a behind-the-scenes peek into her practice on her Instagram. (via Patternbank Blog)

 

 



Art

Swarms of Hybrid Creatures Flow Like Liquid on Walls and Buildings by Pantónio

November 13, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Herds of serpentine rabbits, schools of fish, and flocks of interwoven birds all feature prominently in these recent murals by Portuguese artist Pantónio. Many of the pieces seem to be swirling through water or comprised of liquid itself, often taking inspiration from creatures found in the Tagus river that flows through the middle of Portugal. Seen here are a collection of murals from Pantónio’s travels to Sweden, Morocco, Florida, and elsewhere. You can follow more of his work on Facebook.

 

 



Art History

An Astonishingly Small Stone Carving That Has the Power to Change Art History

November 10, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

The Pylos Combat Agate, an intricately carved 3,500-year-old sealstone discovered in a the tomb of a Greek warrior. All images courtesy of The Department of Classics, University of Cincinnati

More than two years ago researchers from the University of Cincinnati unearthed a 3,500-year-old tomb in the southwest of Greece. The tomb belonged to a Bronze Age warrior nicknamed the “Griffin Warrior,” and contained many treasures, such as four gold signet rings, that have challenged previous notions about the origins of Greek civilization.

Perhaps one of the most important and visually captivating finds from the tomb occurred a full year after its discovery. Researchers uncovered a carved sealstone no larger than an inch and a half wide. The “Pylos Combat Agate” meticulously displays two warriors engaged in battle with bodies strewn at their feet, with some details less than a millimeter wide. The carving is perhaps most astonishing because it predates artistic skills that were not associated with Greek civilization for another millennium.

“What is fascinating is that the representation of the human body is at a level of detail and musculature that one doesn’t find again until the classical period of Greek art 1,000 years later,” said Jack Davis, Carl W. Blegen professor of Greek archaeology at the University of Cincinnati in UC Magazine. “It’s a spectacular find.”

In a testament to the anonymous artist’s skills, it’s also worthy to note that magnifying glasses were not believed to be used for another thousand years. This ability and sophistication shows that the inhabitants of the area were creating art with an interest and knowledge of representational art not previously imagined. This new discovery, explained Davis and fellow dig leader Shari Stocker, is a catalyst to completely reevaluate the timeline and development of Greek art.

You can read more about the miniature carving and the Griffin Warrior’s tomb in UC Magazine. (via Neatorama and The History Blog)