Amazing Lighting Effects for the ‘Cavity’ Music Video Made with a Humble Flashlight

Amazing Lighting Effects for the Cavity Music Video Made with a Humble Flashlight music video light

Amazing Lighting Effects for the Cavity Music Video Made with a Humble Flashlight music video light

This is a stunning new music video for American indie band Hundred Waters latest single Cavity directed by Michael Langan. Langan previously worked on the wildly popular experimental film Choros featured here last year. Amazingly Cavity was filmed without the use of CG, but instead relies on simple lighting effects. He shares via email:

The video is a kind of pas de deux between the woman (Nicole Miglis), and light − evading it, summoning it, and ultimately being consumed by it. We’re playing with the idea of hollowness, attempting to define emptiness by its edges, visually.

There’s no CG in the video, just practical effects. Most of the video is lit by a single flashlight, drawn slowly over the landscape and later “echoed” up to 500 times to create patterns that fill the scene with light. We used a projector mounted to a motorized lazy susan to achieve the “sliver” shots of Nicole.

It helps that the stunning visuals are paired with such a great song. Miglis has an amazing voice. (via Colossal Submissions)

DIY House Plant Cupcakes

DIY House Plant Cupcakes plants food DIY cooking cake cacti

DIY House Plant Cupcakes plants food DIY cooking cake cacti

DIY House Plant Cupcakes plants food DIY cooking cake cacti

Apropos of I’m on a diet and am also a masochist, Brooklyn-based baker Alana Jones-Mann has a sweet DIY article on how to make cupakes that look like common miniature cacti. It turns out all you need is mass quantities of tasty, tasty frosting (because why does anyone eat a cupcake anyway), green food coloring, and an unreasonable amount of baking talent. If you liked this, you might also like cakes that look like planets. (via Neatorama, Blazenfluff)

New Architectural Watercolors by Maja Wronska

New Architectural Watercolors by Maja Wronska watercolor painting illustration architecture

New Architectural Watercolors by Maja Wronska watercolor painting illustration architecture

New Architectural Watercolors by Maja Wronska watercolor painting illustration architecture

New Architectural Watercolors by Maja Wronska watercolor painting illustration architecture

New Architectural Watercolors by Maja Wronska watercolor painting illustration architecture

New Architectural Watercolors by Maja Wronska watercolor painting illustration architecture

New Architectural Watercolors by Maja Wronska watercolor painting illustration architecture

New Architectural Watercolors by Maja Wronska watercolor painting illustration architecture

New Architectural Watercolors by Maja Wronska watercolor painting illustration architecture

New Architectural Watercolors by Maja Wronska watercolor painting illustration architecture

New Architectural Watercolors by Maja Wronska watercolor painting illustration architecture

New Architectural Watercolors by Maja Wronska watercolor painting illustration architecture

New Architectural Watercolors by Maja Wronska watercolor painting illustration architecture

Architect and freelance illustrator Maja Wrońska (previously) continues to amaze with her beautifully executed watercolor paintings of iconic cityscapes from around the world. From London and Paris to Prague and even Disney Land, the Polish artist brings a colorful, dreamlike perspective to everything she paints. Wrońska has been extremely active since we first covered her work here back in 2012, see much more on Behance, and pickup prints and other things on Society6.

Línea de Horizonte: An Installation of 60 Morphing Heads by Javier Perez

Línea de Horizonte: An Installation of 60 Morphing Heads by Javier Perez sculpture multiples

Línea de Horizonte: An Installation of 60 Morphing Heads by Javier Perez sculpture multiples

Línea de Horizonte: An Installation of 60 Morphing Heads by Javier Perez sculpture multiples

Línea de Horizonte: An Installation of 60 Morphing Heads by Javier Perez sculpture multiples

Línea de horizonte is a 2006 sculpture by artist Javier Perez depicting a sequence of 60 heads as they gradually morph into (and out of) detail. The multidisciplinary artist frequently explores aspects of mortality through anatomical forms in sculpture, painting and other mediums. Perez has upcoming solo shows at both the Mario Mauroner Contemporary Art in Austria and the Centre d’Arts des Pénitents Noirs in France later this year. You can follow his work on Tumblr and over on Facebook. (via My Amp Goes to 11)

A Hand-Cranked Automaton That Mimics the Effect of a Raindrop Hitting Water

A Hand Cranked Automaton That Mimics the Effect of a Raindrop Hitting Water wood water kinetic automata

A Hand Cranked Automaton That Mimics the Effect of a Raindrop Hitting Water wood water kinetic automata

This little wood automaton is meant to mimic the effect of a water drop hitting a body of water, all using concentric rings cut from wood that are manipulated by a hand crank. The piece was created by UK-based designer Dean O’Callaghan, inspired by the work of Reuben Margolin (most likely his round wave sculpture). (via The Automata Blog)

The Wild Adventures of Joe Iurato’s Tiny Wooden Figures

The Wild Adventures of Joe Iuratos Tiny Wooden Figures wood street art

The Wild Adventures of Joe Iuratos Tiny Wooden Figures wood street art

The Wild Adventures of Joe Iuratos Tiny Wooden Figures wood street art

The Wild Adventures of Joe Iuratos Tiny Wooden Figures wood street art

The Wild Adventures of Joe Iuratos Tiny Wooden Figures wood street art

The Wild Adventures of Joe Iuratos Tiny Wooden Figures wood street art

The Wild Adventures of Joe Iuratos Tiny Wooden Figures wood street art

The Wild Adventures of Joe Iuratos Tiny Wooden Figures wood street art

Inspired by various stages of his life, from skateboarding to breakdancing and rock climbing to the experiences of fatherhood, New Jersey-based artist Joe Iurato creates tiny wooden figures and sets them loose in public places. The daring little people dangle from bridges, swing from street signs, and often create their own “art” in the form of painted slogans left of sidewalks and curbs. Iurato discusses his work in this 2013 interview with Brooklyn Street Art:

The pieces I’ve been making are small, spray painted wood cutouts. No bigger than 15” in size. The subjects vary, but they’re all very personal – they sort of tell the story of my life in stages. From break dancing to skateboarding to rock climbing to becoming a father, all of these things have helped define my character. For me, it’s just about revisiting those moments in a way that’s familiar. I’ve always appreciated seeing architecture and nature in a different light. As a skater, the tar banks behind a local supermarket, a flight of stairs, a parking block, a drainage ditch, a handrail, a wall – they all present possibilities for interaction and fun in ways they weren’t intended to be used.

Iurato frequently leaves the artworks to be discovered by the community, where depending on their location, they may only last a few days or even hours. The artist will have work at R.Jampol Projects starting March 9th, 2014 and you can follow him on Flickr and over on Facebook. (via Junk Culture, Visual News)

Sponsor // Craftsy Class Giveaway: Learn to Paint an Allegory

Finally, the inner structure of Renaissance masterpieces revealed!  Enter our special giveaway today for your chance to win the online Craftsy class Painting an Allegory: Concept to Canvas (a $49.99 value).

Get step-by-step guidance from acclaimed painter Martin Wittfooth, whose works have been featured in American Artist and New American Paintings magazines and internationally in galleries, without ever leaving your home. Learn the secrets to storytelling with professional oil painting techniques that will enrich your use of themes and symbols. Discover three classic composition styles that will change the way you look at art: the golden ratio, rule of thirds and diamond guide. Plus, ask Martin questions as you go for all the answers you need to succeed.

Enter for your chance to win here, and find out how to make powerful allegorical paintings that will fascinate viewers and ignite their imaginations. Entry closes on March 9, 2014.Sponsor // Craftsy Class Giveaway: Learn to Paint an Allegory sponsor

Metropolis II: A Kinetic Sculpture That Circulates 100,000 Miniature Cars Every Hour

Metropolis II: A Kinetic Sculpture That Circulates 100,000 Miniature Cars Every Hour multiples installation cars

This is a lovely video about Metropolis II, an impressive kinetic installation that circulates 100,000 toy cars every hour through a vast network of 18 tracks. Created by conceptual artist Chris Burden, the piece has been on view since 2011 at the Los Angeles Museum of Art. Via the museum:

Chris Burden’s Metropolis II is an intense kinetic sculpture, modeled after a fast paced, frenetic modern city. Steel beams form an eclectic grid interwoven with an elaborate system of 18 roadways, including one six lane freeway, and HO scale train tracks. Miniature cars speed through the city at 240 scale miles per hour; every hour, the equivalent of approximately 100,000 cars circulate through the dense network of buildings. According to Burden, “The noise, the continuous flow of the trains, and the speeding toy cars produce in the viewer the stress of living in a dynamic, active and bustling 21st century city.”

Video by Supermarché.

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