Kniterate: A New Digital Knitting Machine Lets You ‘Print’ Fashion Designs 

Kniterate is a compact industrial knitting machine created for designers and entrepreneurs that facilitates the one-off creation of garments. Built by London-based designer Gerard Rubio, Kniterate is meant to act as a sort of 3D printer for knitwear, allowing you to create digital designs in Photoshop and turn them into a wearable garments in just a few hours. The machine is capable of knitting scarves, sweaters, dresses, ties, or even the components of shoes. Kniterate could dramatically reduce lead time for a fashion business or design school in need of quick prototyping, or help a more ambitious artist in the fabrication a completely unique wardrobe. Learn more over on Kickstarter. (via Inhabitat, Make:)

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Colossal x Josh Keyes Print Release: I’ll Melt With You 

We are honored to have worked with Portland-based painter Josh Keyes on an exclusive release of the print edition of his 2016 painting, “I’ll Melt With You,” available now in The Colossal Shop.

Keyes’ ability to paint realistic renderings of our world becomes uncanny when he wields his brush in the name of environmental issues. Animals, rocket ships, and icebergs fall prey to graffiti, leaving the viewer uncomfortably wondering whether this is a painting of the future or a photograph of the present.

“I’ll Melt With You,” originally painted in acrylic on a 12 x 16 inch panel is translated to print form in its full dimensions, with an additional white border for convenient framing, for a final size of 16 x 20 inches. Printed by our friends at ioLabs in Rhode Island on Epson Hot Press Bright 300 gsm archival paper and available exclusively in The Colossal Shop.

Hazy Black Watercolor Paintings of Children with Animals 

Indonesia-based watercolor artist Elicia Edijanto (previously here and here) depicts loving relationships between wildlife and children set against atmospheric backdrops painted in black watercolor. “My subject are often children and animal because they are honest, sincere, unprejudiced and unpretentious,” shares Edijanto. “They give me so much inspiration for [a] particular mood or atmosphere, such as tranquility, solemnity, and also wilderness and freedom, which I put on my paintings.” Seen here are a number of recent paintings from the last year or so, some of which are available as prints and originals via her website. You can follow her works in progress on Instagram.

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Giant Chocolate-Covered Rock Candy Geodes Months in the Making 

Six months in the making, these enormous chocolate-covered rock candy geodes are the creation of culinary students Alex Yeatts and Abby Lee Wilcox, the results of a final project for the Culinary Institute of America in New York. Details are scarce on how the duo went about creating the giant sugar rocks, some of which have the distinct hue of purple amethyst. The calorie count is also elusive, but we can only imagine it equates to the years these things take to form in real life. (via Sploid)

A post shared by Alex Yeatts (@alex.yeatts) on

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A post shared by Alex Yeatts (@alex.yeatts) on

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Fun Black and White Murals of Friends and Family by Alex Senna 

It’s not often that you walk down the street and encounter an artwork that warms your heart or brings a smile to your face, but for Brazilian street artist and muralist Alex Senna, positive emotion seems to be his visual currency. His lanky black and white characters are often found in a variety of hopeful, loving, and positive scenes from a pair of lovers embracing to a family riding a bicycle. To intensify their emotional depth Senna often gives the flat characters broad shadows that stretch out larger-than-life across urban walls. You can check out more of Senna’s work on Instagram.

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Smashed Can Sculptures That Mimic Traditional Ming Dynasty Porcelain by Lei Xue 

Adopting traditional decorative motifs found on Ming Dynasty ceramics, Chinese artist Lei Xue sculpted these humorous smashed aluminum cans that bridge the gap of some 600 years of art history. The pieces are part of an ongoing series titled Drinking Tea, and unlike the mechanical process of producing cans, each object is sculpted and painted by hand. You can see more of Xue’s work at Martina Detterer Gallery. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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