Art

Vibrant Sunsets Hover Inside Abandoned Scottish Castles and Homes by Andrew McIntosh

October 17, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Scottish painter Andrew McIntosh (previously) paints bridges, castles, and forgotten homes, repurposing the structures’ windows and arches as vibrant portals into another world. The deep red and orange sunsets found in these negative spaces serve as the heart of each work, which each cast an intense glow into the surrounding desolate landscapes. The works are centered around scenes found in his native Scotland, areas that don’t necessarily elicit awe or intrigue from the average viewer.

“McIntosh is drawn to the plain and ordinary – a Victorian lodge, a simple tower house, or an unremarkable castle set in scenery that is not immediately picturesque or inspiring – subjects that wouldn’t usually attract an artist’s attention,” writes Dr. Richard Davey in an essay about McIntosh’s paintings. “They are born from deep knowledge of the land, painted by an artist who wants to probe the limits of landscape painting, who knows that nature is much quieter than it is more usually portrayed, and that capturing the undramatic, ordinariness of nature, is more difficult than it may seem.”

The confined sunsets serve as secretive elements of power to each crumbling form of architecture. McIntosh intends for these private moments to remind the viewer of everyday wonder, and to search for these moments during the mundane aspects of the day-to-day. The painter has an upcoming solo exhibition of his work at Beaux Arts London opening October 19 and running through November 18, 2017.


 

 

 



Craft

Kernel Panic: New Binary Ceramics Punctuated with Typewriter Keys by Laura C. Hewitt

October 17, 2017

Christopher Jobson

From her small studio in rural Alaska, artist Laura C. Hewitt fuses the technological with the handmade, producing cyberpunk dishware and cyborg decor from wheel-thrown ceramics. A recurring theme in her work are plates, cups, and bowls speckled with 0’s and 1’s formed by vintage alphanumeric and punctuation keys from old typewriters or machinist punches. She often fires the pieces multiple times to enhance the worn appearance of each object, pieces that might look right at home on the desk of H. R. Giger. You can follow her most recent work on Instagram and she has several pieces available on Etsy.

 

 



Photography Science

Envisioning Chemistry: Stunning Footage of Chemical Reactions Filmed by WenTing Zhu

October 17, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Chemical reactions can be described with words, formulas, and observed with the naked eye, but in the capable hands of filmmaker and photographer WenTing Zhu they take on a near miraculous quality as part of this ongoing Beauty of Science series (previously). Zhu has just shared several new videos highlighting electrodeposition, precipitation, bubbles, metal displacement, and many others. You can see more on the Beauty of Science website.

 

 



Art

Sky-High Paper Wigs Topped With Modern Luxuries by Asya Kozina

October 16, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Paper artist Asya Kozina was inspired by the decadent wigs found in Baroque and Rococo still lifes, tall masses of hair adorned with objects that represent the ideals of luxury and beauty in the 17th and 18th centuries. Her series Skyscraper on the Head imagines how these outdated accessories might look if produced today, replacing the exotic fruits and birds of early centuries with airplanes, skyscrapers, and ferris wheels.

The project is a continuation of a series of Baroque paper wigs the artist began making in 2015. You can see more of Kozina’s life-size and miniature paper costumes on her Instagram and Behance. (via Design Boom)

 

 



Design

Yellow Street Lines Form a Park Bench Around a Tree in this Temporary Green Space by The Edible Bus Stop

October 16, 2017

Christopher Jobson

As part of the 2012 RHS Hampton Court Palace Flower Show in London, landscape and design consultancy The Edible Bus Stop conceived of a green space that incorporated gardens, artwork, and the conversion of a street into public space. The temporary exhibition titled Riot of Color was conceived as “a post apocalyptic interpretation of the after effects of the 2011 London riots.” One of the more novel aspects was this fun park bench designed as yellow street lines that rise from pavement to wrap around a tree. You can see more views on their website. (via Visual Fodder)

 

 



Art

Beetle Sculptures Encrusted with Minerals by Nozomi

October 15, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Paris-based artist Nozomi created these glistening beetle specimens through a process of digital sculpting, 3d printing, and good old-fashioned lacquer painting. The works are a continuation of an ongoing series where she explores the backs of beetles as a backdrop for her ditigal work. Nozomi is selling a few of the pieces on Etsy and you can follow her on Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Photography

Photographer Introduces Himself to His Childhood Self in Series of Hilarious Photoshopped Images

October 13, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Montreal-based photographer Conor Nickerson was flipping through family photos when he wondered what it might look like to see his present self Photoshopped next to his childhood self, a version he only remembered through old photographs. After gathering clothing, hats, and shoes that would match his boyhood self, he spent several hours in Photoshop learning how to accurately match his image to the photo’s time period.

The series, Childhood, is described as “Myself hanging out with myself, c. 1997-2005,” and took Nickerson about 6 months to complete. You can find more of Nickerson’s work on his website and Facebook. (via PetaPixel)