This Translucent Cube Hides Six Handpainted Anamorphic Images 

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Artist Thomas Medicus (previously) just unveiled a new anamorphic sculpture titled Emergence Lab that contains six handpainted images inside a large translucent cube. The six fragmented paintings are spread across 216 laser-cut acrylic glass strips that are designed to perfectly align when viewed directly from each side. Each figure is cleverly contained within the same surface as its counterpart on the opposite side, and the object is filled with silicone oil giving it the look and feel of solid glass. Watch the video to see how it works, and Medicus shares some behind the scenes photos of his design process. You can also follow him on Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

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A Perpetual Sisyphus Kinetic Sculpture Built with Lego 

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Jason Allemann of JK Brickworks designed this superb perpetual kinetic sculpture depicting the Greek myth of Sisyphus who was condemned to roll an immense boulder up a hill for eternity. In the video below he explains how the device works in detail, and for the more engineering-minded you can download a building guide and parts list from his website. (via The Automata Blog)

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Designer Jati Putra’s Digital Photo Manipulations Warp Space and Time 

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Turning oceans on their sides and beaches into XXL stadiums, graphic designer Jati Putra distorts images through a process of digital bending and layering that confuses the senses as to where is up or down. Working with images that capture large-scale environments, Putra transposes ocean scenes with images of space—transporting Santa Monica pier to the outer layers of earth’s atmosphere and a Greek-columned building high above the clouds. You can see more of the Indonesia-based designer’s land-bending digital images on his Instagram. (via Designboom)

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Artist Paul Villinski Brings Flight to the Gallery with Swarms of Repurposed Aluminum Can Butterflies 

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Fallen, 2015 Steel, aluminum (found cans), wire, soot, Flashe; 62-3/4″ x 113-1/4″ x 9-1/2″

Working with repurposed objects like aluminum cans and old gloves, artist Paul Villinski (previously) explores themes of flight, environmentalism, as well as addiction and recovery. His primary muse has taken the form of butterflies rendered in multiples as they swirl across walls, or carefully organize into shapes (fun fact: a group of butterflies is called a kaleidoscope).

“Underlying everything is the drive to simply share human experience in a way that elicits feelings of recognition and belonging — an impulse behind much of the history of art,” says Villinski. “I want to create images and experiences that allow viewers to ‘identify,’ to feel our commonality, to know that they are not alone.”

The son of an Air Force navigator, Villinski is an experienced pilot of sailplanes, paragliders and single-engine airplanes. These experiences of soaring through the sky are something he hopes to connect his audience with through his artwork. He shares with Jonathan Ferrara Gallery:

I’m not alone in this: from Leonardo to Lindbergh to Lenny Kravitz, the desire to “fly away” has had a grip on our collective imagination for millennia. Now and then, I have the extraordinary luck to spend a few hours floating along on currents of warm air, the earth’s surface slipping silently by, the mundane anxieties of daily life thousands of feet below the long, white wings of my glider. Back in the studio, I wish I could bring everyone I’ve ever met along in the tiny cockpit of my sailplane. Instead, I look for forms to describe the longing to enter the sky, to get us all aloft, even from within the confines of the gallery.

You can see Villinski’s current exhibition Departure at Jonathan Ferrara Gallery in New Orleans through December 26, 2015.

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Mirror VIII, 2015. Wood frame, aluminum (found cans) wire, steel, Flashe; 50-1/2″ x 43-1/4″ x 9-1/2″

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Cirrus, 2015. Powder coated steel, found aluminum cans, wire, blue Flashe; Overall: 114 x 37 x 8 in

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Lense, 2015. Aluminum (found cans), wire, Flashe, latex on MDF and steel panel; 48″ x 48″ x 11″

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Paradigm (installation view), 2014. Wall: Return Floor: Self-Portrait

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Arcus, 2012. Aluminum (found cans), stainless steel wire, Flashe; 62” x 142” x 9”

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Arcus, detail

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Nightfall, 2015. Found gloves, rivets, steel; 122″ x 36″ x 12″

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Nightfall, detail

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New Conceptual Self-Portraits Tap Into Photographer Kylli Sparre’s Fantastical Imagination 

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Tapping into unlived memories, Kylli Sparre (previously here and here) produces conceptual photographs that seem to be pulled from dark fairytales and otherworldly settings. The images are always focused on a lone woman in a dramatically staged pose, a reference to her past as a professionally trained ballet dancer. The environment surrounding the women is often hazy— barren landscapes that seem to isolate the women in both space and time.

Sparre’s work was featured at this year’s Art The Hague art fair in Amsterdam by Qlick Editions. You can see more of the Estonia-based artist’s thoughtfully composed images on her Facebook and portfolio site.

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Synthetic Nature: Digital Lifeforms that Respond to Manipulated Audio Recordings 

Artist Andy Thomas recently shared a montage of new sound art pieces titled Synthetic Nature that shows his beautifully bizarre digital sculptures as they move in response to audio. The virtual organisms are constructed using a host of software (3ds Max, Realflow, Quantum force, Fume fx, Krakatoa, Frost, etc.), with the end result being ‘programs’ that visually react to an array of audio inputs. Different frequencies or tones cause the piece to behave in varying ways based on Thomas’ own manipulated audio of flora and fauna recorded around Australia. You can see more of his experiments on Vimeo, and he also creates wild digital images available as prints on RedBubble.

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