Sou Fujimoto’s Giant Serpentine Pavilion Converted into a Storm of LED Lightning by UVA

sou-1

sou-2

sou-3

sou-4

sou-4

sou-5

For the last thirteen years Serpentine Gallery has invited a guest architect to design a temporary structure on the London gallery’s front lawn. In what is billed as “the most ambitious architectural program of its kind worldwide,” designs have come from such visionaries as Ai Weiwei in 2012 and Frank Gehry in 2008. This year, Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto (who at 41 become the youngest to accept the invitation) constructed a large network of 20mm steel poles and latticed metal that covers an area of 3,800 square feet.

While the white pavilion is impressive in its own right, the gallery further commissioned London-based United Visual Artists to create a network of LED lights that are meant to mimic the natural forms of an electric storm. At night the normally grounded structure becomes an electrified geometric cloud that flashes and pulsates with light. The installation is further enhanced by an accompanied soundtrack of precisely timed soundbites including the buzzing of electrical plants, effectively creating an auditory effect of thunder. A somewhat similar intervention took place here in Chicago a few years ago when LuftWerk transformed Anish Kapoor’s Cloud Gate. (via Wired, Huffington Post)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

New Paper Birds from Diana Beltran Herrera

birds-1

birds-2

birds-3

birds-4

birds-6

birds-7

birds-5

It’s been over a year since we last checked in with paper artist Diana Beltran Herrera (previously here and here) whose skill in crafting the fine details of birds using paper has continued to evolve. Herrera’s work has begun appearing in several galleries and exhibitions around the world including Beers.Lambert Contemporary earlier this year and at the Art and Soul of Paper earlier this spring. She’s currently working on a collection of eight sculptures that will be on view at The Cornell Fine Arts Museum in Florida starting September 17th. See more on Flickr.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Landscapes Formed From Human Bodies by Carl Warner

carl-4
Shin Knee Valley

carl-1
Valley of the Reclining Woman

carl-2
The Desert of Sleeping Men

carl-3
Desert of Backs

carl-5
Shoulder Hill Valley

carl-6
Headless Horizon

In this series of photographs by Carl Warner, human bodies have been contorted, lit, and manipulated to form expansive landscapes reminiscent of barren deserts and mountains. The London-based photographer who might be best known for his Foodscapes, says that he shoots all of the forms in his studio to focus attention on “one person’s body, creating a sense of place so that a body that is lived in becomes a place to live.” The images are then digitally pieced together using Photoshop. If you liked this also check out the work of Arno Rafael Minkkinen and of course Spencer Tunick (nsfw). (via PetaPixel)

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Rainbow Anatomy by Shok Oner

anatomy-1

anatomy-2

anatomy-3

anatomy-4

London-based street artist Shok Oner has been making work since the 1980s. I’m really enjoying his current series of rainbow hued x-ray pieces, some of which have been turned into prints. You can follow him over on Facebook and Flickr. (via street anatomy)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Cenote Angelita: An Underwater River Photographed by Anatoly Beloshchin

river-1

river-6

river-5

river-4

river-3

river-2

river-7

It seems improbable, but these photographs by Anatoly Beloshchin tell the story of a hidden underwater river in in Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula called Cenote Angelita or “Little Angel”. While it appears as though the divers are hovering in the air above a small creek, the photos were shot entirely in a submerged cave formed from collapsed limestone bedrock called a cenote.

The river itself is actually a sort of illusion due to a phenomenon called a halocline, where waters with different levels of salinity form into layers because of a variation in density. According to Beloshchin, Cenote Angelita is comprised of fresh water until about 29 meters when it switches to a 1-meter layer of hydrogen sulfide, after which the entire cave bottom is filled with saltwater from 30 to 60 meters deep. So in reality the “river” is actually just a dense layer of saltwater resting at the bottom of a cave. You can read more over the SeaWayBLOG, and see many more photos in the Underwater Caves section of Beloshchin’s website. (via my modern met)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Calm: A Field of Liquid Construction Debris on the Streets of Vancouver by MadeIn Company

rubble-1

rubble-2

rubble-3


Calm at the Vancouver Art Gallery. DO NOT DO THIS.

What looks like a giant pile of rubble outside the Shangri-La Hotel in downtown Vancouver is actually an art installation by Chinese art collective MadeIn Company titled Calm. All is not as it seems. Pass by in a hurry and you’ll hardly notice this giant pile of broken cement blocks, grass, and construction waste, but stand next to it for just a moment and you’ll notice something almost imperceptible: the entire pile of rubble is moving, slightly undulating atop a giant hidden reservoir of water.

The large field of debris was collected from a renovated Vancouver synagogue and installed on an exhibition space, Offsite, belonging to the Vancouver Art Gallery last April. According to various news reports people seem pretty polarized by the installation, either loving or hating it. The work was inspired by the near perpetual state of urban development currently underway in China. Via the gallery:

Calm’s ambiguity and unexpected ability to move provoke us to question ways of observing, believing and understanding facts, and remind us that the truth often differs from what it seems. In this context, Calm comments on the concerns that arise alongside urban development and the gentrification of residential neighbourhoods, whether in Vancouver or Shanghai. While the volume of construction in Vancouver might pale in comparison and scale to that of Shanghai, there are currently several retail and residential expansions underway within a five-kilometre radius of Offsite.

The installation will be on view through September 29th and you can learn a bit more over on CTV News. It should be noted that if you’re in Vancouver the installation is not actually meant to be touched or climbed on. You can see a similar installation from Benjamin Boré who created the same sort of effect with a brick sidewalk. (thanks julie & rhea)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Pacific Light: Macro Footage of Ink, Oil and Soap Shot by Ruslan Khasanov

032ee0fac461e6581682ffc25583c48e

84b3c68b062d924dcd2efa573954aa87

43019287c8785b9795176f246fe33aa5

Russian graphic designer Ruslan Khasanov who is probably best known for his experiments in liquid typography just released this experimental video where he plays with the interaction between ink, oil, and soap. Khasanov says he became inspired while cooking with a mixture of oil and soy sauce when he noticed the small black beads begin to form at the bottom of a container. He then began playing with a mixture of ink and soap to create this amazing mix of blue, white, yellow, and magenta. See everything in motion in the video above, and you can see some larger stills over on Behance.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Page 184 of 537«...183184185186...»