New Ornate Kaleidoscopic Installations That Mimic Patterned Textiles by Suzan Drummen


Meticulously placing small, ornate materials in eye-dazzling patterns Suzan Drummen (previously) produces kaleidoscopic installations that appear like three dimensional textiles. Within these pieces Drummen likes to explore how artwork can seduce and repulse, drawing the viewer in to take a closer look at the specific details that form the larger installation.

“From a distance they appear clear and orderly, yet upon closer inspection, the eyes become disoriented by the many details and visual stimuli,” said Drummen. “That moment of being able to take it all in or not is explored time and time again.”

Although many of her pieces when zoomed out appear like textiles, a recent installation takes this to heart, appearing like two oriental rugs—one in the color scheme of pink and red and the other in greens and blues. The first piece subtly climbs up the wall, playing further into the illusionistic quality of how her crystal constructions are perceived. This optical trickery is also reflected in her works that involve bodies, ordinarily dressed participants bedazzled to match the pattern on which they sit or lay.

You can see more of the Netherlands-based artist’s work on her Facebook page here.




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From 1975-1980 Activist Adam Purple Built a Circular Urban Garden in New York that ‘Knocked Down’ the Surrounding Buildings

Still from Adam Purple and the Garden of Eden / Harvey Wang and Amy Brost

In 1975, artist and social activist Adam Purple, known for his permanent purple attire, looked out his window in the crime-ridden Lower East Side of New York City to witness two children playing in a pile of rubble. Struck by his own memories of a childhood spent barefoot in rural pastures and forests in Missouri, he suddenly wished these children could feel the dirt beneath their own feet in a safe, debris-free environment. Almost immediately he began work on the Garden of Eden.

Over period of five years, Purple worked continuously to build a concentric garden that would eventually grow to 15,000 square feet. As nearby abandoned structures were torn down the garden continued to grow, a process he metaphorically likened to a garden that knocked down the buildings around it. He physically hauled bricks and building materials away from the site, and hauled in manure from the horses in Central Park.

The Garden of Eden not only provided safe haven to the community, but also produced food in the form of corn, berries, tomatoes, and cucumbers. By the early 80s it had become a famous and beloved landmark in the Lower East Side.

Unfortunately the city of New York never officially recognized Purple’s garden. While other local parks were clearly marked on official city maps, the Garden of Eden space was always labeled as ‘vacant’. Despite pleas from the community, the entire garden was razed with bulldozers in just 75 minutes on January 8, 1986 to make way for development.

Purple himself narrates his story in this thoughtful video by Harvey Wang and Amy Brost from back in 2011. Sadly, he died two weeks ago at the age of 84, and there is currently a fund-raising effort to collect money for his burial and to erect a memorial near 184 Forsyth Street where the garden once stood. Donated.

You can see more photos and read more about Purple in this book, also by Wang & Brost.

Still from Adam Purple and the Garden of Eden / Harvey Wang and Amy Brost

Still from Adam Purple and the Garden of Eden / Harvey Wang and Amy Brost

Still from Adam Purple and the Garden of Eden / Harvey Wang and Amy Brost

Still from Adam Purple and the Garden of Eden / Harvey Wang and Amy Brost

Still from Adam Purple and the Garden of Eden / Harvey Wang and Amy Brost

Still from Adam Purple and the Garden of Eden / Harvey Wang and Amy Brost

Still from Adam Purple and the Garden of Eden / Harvey Wang and Amy Brost

Still from Adam Purple and the Garden of Eden / Harvey Wang and Amy Brost

After a decade of work and upkeep, the Garden of Eden was razed with bulldozers on January 8, 1986 by the City of New York in 75 minutes.

Adam Purple, 1930-2015. Still from Adam Purple and the Garden of Eden / Harvey Wang and Amy Brost

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A New Book Celebrates the 200 Most Beautiful and Innovative Cabins Ever Designed


Built as retreats for solitude and reflection, cabins are typically found in remote areas, tucked into the forest-filled corners of civilization. Due to their remote nature, they are often secreted from the public eye, unless you know the right path to explore. However, as a group of friends (including co-founder of Vimeo, Zach Klein) began to collect inspiration for cabin building projects, they discovered a vast array of outdoor structures and tree-houses with unique architecture on the backroads of America and around the world. They quickly began to document their discoveries online, and the Cabin Porn site was born.

Cabin Porn grew over the course of six years to amass a following of over 350,000 on Tumblr and became a visual bastion for architects, camping aficionados, and anyone craving an escape with a collection of over 12,000 cabin designs. The site has now been transformed into a printed book by the same name, Cabin Porn, a collection that adds narrative to the spaces first documented online to include interior photography, new homes, and advice from cabin makers that touch on subjects from how to live underground to crafting an off-grid bunkhouse.

The book narrows down its sprawling inspiration to just 200 cabins and hopes to not only present the aesthetic of these cabins, but the feel they elicit in their construction. “Inside each of us is a home ready to be built,” says the book’s website. “It takes a supply of ambition and materials to construct a cabin, but the reward is handsome: a shelter for yourself somewhere quiet, and a place to offer warm hospitality to friends.”

Cabin Porn can now be found on Amazon. Take a peek inside the book, and watch a lovely trailer below.









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Rubber Bands with a Bow: The Art of Japanese Packaging Simplified






Japanese design is often focused on adding engaging design to unexpected places, subtly nudging the audience to look twice at everyday objects from erasers to lunch boxes. Designer Yu Aso has placed this idea into one of the most common packaging elements—rubber bands.

Aso has reimagined rubber bands with a mizuhiki twist, a Japanese art form using cords tied with decorative knots. The most common of these is the shoelace knot, which he has effortlessly worked into a rubber band that is appropriately named the mizuhikiband. The band was was originally created as part of the 2013 Kokuyo Design Awards with the theme of “happy x design,” but has since gone through two years of revisions to refine the design and make the product more foreigner-friendly.

It was also important to Aso that the band have a sense of repetition in its design, encouraging users to use the product over and over again to secure a variety of gifts.

Mizuhikibands will be available in four different colors and packaged in groups of 7 beginning in early October. (via Spoon & Tamago)

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New Hand-Sculpted Clay Portraits and Illustrations by Irma Gruenholz


In a fine balance of sculpting, painting, lighting, and photography, Madrid-based artist Irma Gruenholz (previously) creates portraits and still-lifes that could easily be mistaken for 2D images found in storybooks. Gruenholz refers to her pieces as clay illustrations, and works with a variety of materials including modeling clay and plasticine to achieve different effects. Her work appears in advertisements, books, posters, and magazines around the world, and three of her portraits were selected for the Society of Illustrators 57th Exhibition in New York earlier this year.

Gruenholz just shared a new series of illustrations over on Behance, and you can read a recent interview about her process on Brown Paper Bag.










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The Ornate Mosaics and Colorful Tiles of Parisian Floors Shared Through Photographer Sebastian Erras’ Instagram Account


Photographer Sebastian Erras‘s Paris-based project has only one perspective—down. This vantage however, never fails to delight as it is captures the ornate mosaics of Parisian floors, brightly patterned tiles and scenes that exist underfoot. Each shot within Parisian Floors (@parisianfloors) is uniform, a cropped image of Erras’s own shoes and the surrounding tile decorations. This repetitive shot ensures we keep our focus on the tiles, highlighting the exquisite forms that make their way below the photographer’s feet.

Inspiration for the project began when Erras took a trip to Morocco, bringing his love of mosaics back with him to France. Here he became aware of the beautiful floors that graced Paris, coming back to the city with a fresh eye to start his Instagram-focused project.

“After a while being in Paris and wandering around the city, the main attractions and sights become a given,” Erras told Colossal. “Now looking down more often I get to see a whole new side of this city! It has been a good motivation to rediscover Paris again.”

Placing the project on Instagram also allows Erras to map the city of Paris through geotags, building comprehensive map of images and allowing the photographer to see which areas of the city he has yet to discover. (via My Modern Met)











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Scientists Discover the First Biofluorescent Reptile, a ‘Glowing’ Hawksbill Sea Turtle

No this isn’t a clip from the latest Miyazaki anime, this is the first sighting of a real fluorescent turtle.

Marine biologist David Gruber of City University of New York, was recently in the Solomon Islands to film a variety of biofluorescent fish and coral, when suddenly a completey unexpected sight burst into the frame: a glowing yellow and red sea turtle. The creature is a critically endangered hawksbill sea turtle, and until this sighting last July, the phenomenon had never been documented in turtles, let alone any other reptile.

Biofluorescence is the ability for an organism to reflect blue light and re-emit it as a different color, not to be confused with bioluminescence, where organisms produce their own light.

Many undersea creatures like coral, sharks, and some shrimp have shown the ability to show single green, red, or orange colors under the right lighting conditions, but according to National Geographic, no organisms have shown the ability to emit two distinct colors like the hawksbill. As seen in the video, the coloring appears not only in mottled patterns on the turtle’s shell, but even extends within the cracks of its head and feet. Gruber mentions this could be a mixture of both glowing red glowing algae attached to the turtle, but the yellow fluorescence is undoubtedly part of the animal.

Watch the video above to see the moment of discovery and learn more on Nat Geo.

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