Fictionalized Landscapes Created From Strangers’ Old Photographs by j.frede 



Artist j.frede composes flea market photographs into custom built frames, creating visual and narrative landscapes from the previously unassociated materials. The works spread across the wall, building on each other through similar landscapes or horizon lines. The project, titled Fiction Landscapes, builds on the artist’s interest in memory, tapping into others’ momentos of the past to create fictionalized scenes of ambiguous origin.

Although each image has once been a placeholder in time for the photographer, once it gets collected into a mixed up bin at a flea market these associations are erased. “Arranging these into new landscapes that have never existed speaks to the stitching together of human behavior and how we relate to time and the past,” says Frede. “How many people have pulled over at that rest stop and taken nearly the same photo of the plain hillside? All locking their own associations into the view, first road trip with a new love; last road trip to see grandma; one of many road trips alone.”

The Los Angeles-based artist strictly uses anonymous photographs from the past for his works, never incorporating photographs of his own or individuals he knows. The memories he personally imbues into each composition in the series are instead ones he creates while making each arrangement, placing his own marker within the newly composed environment.

Currently j.frede has a piece from Fiction Landscapes in “Three Day Weekend: Party in the Back” at Blum & Poe on view through December 19, 2015. (via Visual News)








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A Tornado of Fire Filmed in Slow Motion 

Gav and Dan over at the Slow Mo Guys are famous for creating bizarre (and usually explosive) events in front of powerful HD slow motion cameras. Almost all of their videos are worth a watch, but their latest involving a spinning tornado of fire is especially great, skip ahead to 1:25 for the good stuff. Although this particular flamey vortex was created artificially using box fans, you can sometimes see real fire tornadoes in the middle of forest fires or spinning off from the plumes near an active volcano.

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Sponsor // Get 50% Off the Craftsy Online-Video Class ‘Dynamic Detail in Pen, Ink & Watercolor’ 


Depict the world around you in fascinating detail using a relaxed, methodical approach. With artist and instructor Steven Reddy as your guide, capture highly detailed scenes as you learn techniques for creating contour drawings, grisaille underpaintings, beautiful watercolors, and more. Enroll in the online Craftsy class, Dynamic Detail in Pen, Ink & Watercolor, for 50% off today — a special offer for Colossal readers.

In these online-video lessons, you’ll learn how to break down a complex scene into an initial sketch that’s light and loose. Then, create contour drawing and a grisaille underpainting that will bring extraordinary dimension to your work, before using a limited watercolor palette to enhance your piece with harmonious color. Finally, finish your work by using contour lines to suggest shaping and hatch marks to create texture.

Visit today to get 50% off lifetime access to the online class, Dynamic Detail in Pen, Ink & Watercolor, and give it a try risk-free with Craftsy’s 100% money-back promise. Offer expires November 30, 2015 at 11:59pm MT.

A Giant LED Star Pierces the Floors of a 4-Story Building in Malaysia 


Malaysian artist Jun Hao Ong constructed this bright LED star that appears to shoot through the floors and ceilings of a 4-story concrete building as part of the 2015 Urban Xchange public art festival. The piece is comprised of steel cables that help suspend a network of over 500 feet of LED lights that grows seamlessly in 12 directions. “The Star is a glitch in current political and cultural climate of the country, it is a manifestation of the sterile conditions of Butterworth, a once thriving industrial port and significant terminal between the mainland and island,” shares Ong.

The Star was curated by Eeyan Chuah and Gabija Grusaite from the Penang-based contemporary art centre, Hin Bus Depot. You can see more of Ong’s elaborate installations using LEDs and flourescent lights on his website. (via The Creators Project)







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The “Sea Organ” Makes Perpetual Music with Ocean Waves 

While many of us are content to listen to the natural sounds of ocean waves, architect Nikola Bašić took things a step further and faciliated a means for ocean currents to produce actual music. Behold: the Sea Organ. Constructed in 2005, the acoustic jetty spans some 230 feet (70 meters) and incorporates 35 polyethylene tubes of varying diameter. As waves flood each tube underwater, displaced air is forced through large whistles tuned to play seven chords of five tones. Day in and day out, music seems to emanate from the ground, a playful interplay between nature and design. Listening to the video above, the sound is somewhat like random chords played by a huge calliope.

linssimato/Flickr. (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Bašić’s Sea Organ won the 2006 European Prize for Urban Public Space, and was inspired by a 1986 piece in San Francisco of similar design called the Wave Organ by Peter Richards and George Gonzalez. (via IFLScience)

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New Nail Sculptures by John Bisbee That Twist Across Floors and Walls 


John Bisbee (previously) has worked with nails as a sculptural medium since he accidentally toppled a bucket of them years ago and was astonished to see how they remained intact, rusted and fused into a single object. Every since, he’s been hammering nails of varying size into complex patterns, using the smallest woodworking nails up to giant 12-inch spikes. Although nails large and small continue to be the focus of his artistic practice, his sculptures remain diverse in their presentation and composition, twisted works making wildly chaotic patterns against walls and neatly arranged nails snaking along gallery floors.

Bisbee currently has two solo exhibitions on view including “Floresco” at the SCAD Museum of Art (through January 3, 2016) and “Only nails, always different” at the PCA&D Gallery (through the end of December). His work is also included in the 2015 Portland Museum of Art Biennial titled “You Can’t Get There From Here” through January 3, 2016.












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New Pet-Friendly Chunky Knits by Anna Mo 



Anna Mo (previously) knits with chunky spools of wool, utilizing giant needles to produces the three-inch stitches that comprise her blankets, wraps, and now tiny pet beds. The animal-focused textiles mimic the appearance of her human accessories, crafted in bright blue, pink, and orange encasements that are perfect for the upcoming winter. Due to the round shape of the beds they even begin to look like spools of yarn themselves, hollowed out to perfectly snuggle your pooch or kitty.

Mo sells her thick knits through her Etsy shop Ohhio, and each of her creations are crafted from 100% merino wool. After first discovering the material Mo would knit with her hands, which gave inspired her large signature loops. She outlines more of her creative process in an endearing and humorous Kickstarter she just launched to help Ohhio expand their line of knit products. See more of her soft creations on her Instagram here. (via My Modern Met)







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