Miniature Hand Thrown Pottery by Jon Almeda

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Master of the miniature Jon Almeda creates tiny hand thrown ceramics at 1″ scale that are every bit as detailed and perfect as their much larger counterparts. The Washington-based artist makes vases, bowls, and even tea kettles tiny enough to sit atop a coin or toothbrush. Despite their fragile beginnings, the pieces are sturdy enough to endure standard glazing and firing to emerge as fully finished ceramics. Almeda uses a custom designed motorized curio wheel that affords the precise control needed to execute minute handbuilding techniques need for each object.

To see more, you can follow him on Instagram or maybe even take a class through the International Guild of Miniature Artisans of which he is a member. (via Artfido)

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Repurposed Wood Doors and Furniture Transformed into Geometric Faces on the Streets of Belgium

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Over the last year, Belgian painter and sculpturor Stefaan De Croock aka Strook (previously) began working with repurposed wood panels, doors, and furniture to construct giant faces on the side of buildings. The recycled wood surfaces are cut into precise geometric shapes and pieced together like a tangram puzzle, leaving the original paint and textures untouched. His most recent piece, Elsewhere, was a collaboration with his 69-year-old dad for Mechelen Muurt. You can see more of Strook’s paintings, sculptures, and other artworks on his website. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Long-Exposure Photographs of a New Zealand Cave Illuminated by Glowing Worms

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The twinkling lights dotting the ceiling of this dazzling cave system are the work of arachnocampa luminosa, a bioluminescent gnat larva (also called a glowworm) found throughout the island nation of New Zealand. It is believed that the light, emitted mostly from females, is how the insects find mates. These long-exposure photos by local photographer Joseph Michael capture small communities of worms amongst 30 million-year-old limestone formations on North Island. You can see more shots from the project titled Luminosity, here.

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The Wave Cabinet Opens Like a Paper Fan

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As part of a long series of functional sculptures by New York artist Sebastian ErraZuriz, the Wave Cabinet merges the form of a credenza with an elaborate system of 100 wooden slats that allows the piece to open in rolling, wave-like patterns. Like many of his other novel designs, ErraZuriz says his intention is to elicit curiosity and cause viewers to do a double-take when looking at a recognizable object that suddenly behaves in new ways. “I am inviting people to look at one of the simplest forms of furniture design and to forget that we’re talking about furniture, instead to see it as a way of breaking a box.” Watch the video below to see it in action, and also see his equally fun Explosion Cabinet. (via The Kid Should See This, Prosthetic Knowledge)

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Camp in the Air: New Suspended Treehouse Tents and Hammocks Designed by Tentsile

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Since we last mentioned Tensile tents around this time last year, the company has unveiled several new models of their fantastic suspended tent systems. There’s a small hammock for three that can be layered into a multi-tiered treehouse, a 2-layer tree tent, and a massive communal tent system designed to hold 6 people high in the air. Tentsile was invented by designers Alex Shirley-Smith and Kirk Kirchev in 2012 and have since taken the camping world by storm, opening their own factory and picking up an ISPO design award. You can see plenty more here.

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New Reflected Landscapes and Photo Manipulations by Victoria Siemer

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Brooklyn-based graphic designer Victoria Siemer (previously) explores the idea of fractured landscapes through photo manipulations and collages. Siemer makes use of reflected geometric shapes suspended over gloomy natural landscapes shrouded in fog and clouds resulting in portal-like mirrors. She says much of her work is guided by the idea of emotional fragmentation and “fragmentation of the self,” a topic she explored in-depth while studying design at SUNY Buffalo. You can keep up with her work on Instagram and some of her pieces are available as prints.

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New Time-lapse Videos of Spontaneous Sand Paintings by Joe Mangrum

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Artist Joe Mangrum (previously) was just in Zuidlaren, Netherlands, where he was commissioned by the Doe Museum to create 8 temporary sand paintings over a period of 11 days. All of Mangrum’s paintings are spontaneous and evolve as he works, a grueling physical process that involves dozens of revolutions around the artwork as he adds new details and flourishes by pouring brightly colored sand. All eight artworks were photographed as he worked and turned into time-lapse videos, three of which are included here. The sand paintings will remain on view through October 30, 2015. You can follow more of Mangrum’s work on Facebook.

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