New Flying Houses Hover Above Paris by Laurent Chéhère 

As part of his ongoing series titled Flying Houses, French artist Laurent Chéhère (previously) imagines a world without gravity where unusual architectural structures seem to float midair, tethered only by loose strands of power lines. Each house seems dense with details, telling the story of fictional inhabitants through purposeful details that allude to much deeper stories behind each image. Chéhère draws influence from Jules Verne to Hayao Miyazaki, but most poignantly brings attention to marginalized communities found in Paris, specifically Gypsies and immigrants. By uprooting the houses he hopes the viewer focuses more clearly on them, an act he refers to as “releasing them from the anonymity of the street.”

Each house is actually an extremely detailed photomontage and begins life as a series of sketches. Chéhère then photographs hundreds of elements like antennas, walls, roofs, graffiti, and birds which he then assembles digitally into the pieces you see here.

Several recent artworks by Chéhère are currently on view at Muriel Guepin Gallery in New York along with miniature buildings by Joshua Smith. You can see more of his photographic work on Instagram.

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Lines in the Sand: Artist Jim Denevan Turns Beaches into Temporary Geometric Artworks 

For well over a decade California artist Jim Denevan (previously) has made his mark in the sand, etching elaborate geometric artworks on beaches around the world using little more than a rake or found stick. The pieces last only a few hours, or begin disappearing even as he works, as the tides quickly erase each design leaving only a memory or a photograph. Great Big Story recently visited Denevan and shot this brief profile of the artist as he created a number of pieces.

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Colorful Cubist Tattoos Inked by Mike Boyd 

London-based tattoo artist Mike Boyd is a dedicated traveler, viewing the act as a necessary component to developing his style of cubist-focused tattoos. His bright and angular work features Picasso-like faces and segmented bodies, impactful tattoos that make it difficult to discern skin from canvas.

In case you aren’t interested in making a lifetime commitment to one of Boyd’s pieces, he has a series of limited edition prints available on his website. You can see more of his permanent work, as well as keep updated on his travels to various tattoo studios, on his Instagram. (via Illusion)

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Paper Cutouts by ‘Paperboyo’ Transform World Landmarks into Quirky Scenes 

London-based paper artist and photographer Rich McCor (aka. paperboyo) has a way of seeing the world from a slightly different perspective. By adding a simple paper cutout to the foreground of famous buildings or other popular tourist attractions, he creates novel moments in time where an octopus squirms from inside the Colosseum or a WW2-era sailor embraces the Leaning Tower of Pisa in reference to the famous photo by Alfred Eisenstaedt. McCor makes frequent mentions to pop culture by recreating scenes from films or by repurposing works from other artists. To see what he dreams up next you can join his near quarter million followers on Instagram. (via Creators Project)

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New Sculptural Eyewear Produced From Salvaged Street Metal and Found Objects by Cyrus Kabiru 

Kwa Kubadilishana Utamaduni, Macho Nne: At the Dot, 2017. 59 1/10 × 47 1/5 in

Self-taught Kenyan artist Cyrus Kabiru (previously) fashions extravagant eyewear from pieces of found metal and other salvaged materials on the streets of his hometown of Nairobi. Kabiru has been building his futuristic glasses since childhood, and dedicates much of his time to producing works for his C-Stunner series of eyeglasses and coordinating photographs. Recently Kabiru has begun to expand his work to include large non-body-based sculptures, installations, and collage.

Kabiru’s practice is deeply tied to Afrofuturism, a genre that combines science fiction, magical realism, and historical fiction with the culture and politics of the African diaspora. His work was featured in the newly released Gestalten publication Africa Rising: Fashion, Design and Lifestyle from Africa. You can see more of his eyewear and larger sculptures on Artsy and SMAC.

Kubwa Macho Nne – American Darts, 2015.

Kubwa Macho Nne – Tom and Jerry (2015)

Mali Ya Mfalme, Macho Nne | Nubia Kale (Ancient Nubia), 2016

Njia Ya Maisha Macho Nne Throwback, 2015

Njia Ya Maisha, Macho Nne Egyptian Peacock, 2015

Kwa Kubadilishana Utamaduni, Macho Nne: Catalan Sun, 2017

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Hollow Figurative Sculptures by Park Ki Pyung 

South Korean sculptor Park Ki Pyung creates hollow human works from resin and steel, pieces that appear to express an extreme melancholia with bowed heads and resigned body language. The life-size sculptures are held upright with rebar, and are built to reflect Pyung’s deep existential musings. By stripping the figures’ cores he points towards his own inner turmoil, presenting figurative shells, rather than completed human forms. You can view more of his hollow steel sculptures on his Instagram. (via iGNANT)

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