Art

Hordes of Silhouettes Form Trees and Other Figures in New Murals from David de la Mano & Pablo Herrero

October 22, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Artist collaborators David de la Mano & Pablo S. Herrero have unveiled mural after mural this year from Winter Haven, Florida to Gdansk, Poland. The duo uses only black paint to create elaborate silhouetted figures of trees, whales, and human forms. You can see much more of their recent work here. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Art

Towering Wooden Set Pieces and Combustible Monuments by Manolo Garcia

October 21, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Spanish artist Manolo Garcia constructs towering replicas of renaissance-era sculptures, portraits, animals, and other decorative objects from his expansive workshop in Valencia, Spain. Garcia refers to his practice as ‘artistic carpentry’ and by looking at process photos of the studio’s work, that seems like a fair descriptor. Most of the set pieces, monuments, and sculptures built by Garcia begin with strips of wood that are applied to large architectural armature. The objects are usually so large they are first built in pieces and later assembled on-site.

Last March, Garcia participated in the annual Las Fallas (Fire Festival) in Valencia where a series of large artworks are set on fire at night as part of a Burning Man-esque spectacle. To be fair, the Fallas festivals in their current format pre-date the popular Nevada festival by about 44 years, and may have originated as far back as the Middle Ages.

You can see much more of Garcia’s work in this gallery. (via Juxtapoz, Artnau)

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EJ2BEC Valencia, Spain. 20th Mar, 2015. The municipal falla monument 'la Fuerza' by artist Manolo Garcia goes up in flames during the 'crema' at the end of the Fallas Festival © Matthias Oesterle/ZUMA Wire/ZUMAPRESS.com/Alamy Live News

EJ2BEC Valencia, Spain. 20th Mar, 2015. The municipal falla monument ‘la Fuerza’ by artist Manolo Garcia goes up in flames during the ‘crema’ at the end of the Fallas Festival © Matthias Oesterle/ZUMA Wire/ZUMAPRESS.com/Alamy Live News

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EJ2BEC Valencia, Spain. 20th Mar, 2015. The municipal falla monument ‘la Fuerza’ by artist Manolo Garcia goes up in flames during the ‘crema’ at the end of the Fallas Festival © Matthias Oesterle/ZUMA Wire/ZUMAPRESS.com/Alamy Live News

 

 



Amazing Science

An Elephant Appears to Emerge from a Cliff Face in Iceland

October 21, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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“Roca del elefante, Heimaey, Islas Vestman, Suðurland, Islandia, 2014-08-17, DD 036” by Diego Delso. Licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons

Apropos of nothing, here’s a few photos of a natural rock formation off the coast of Iceland that looks like an imposing elephant with its trunk dipped in the Atlantic. Located on the island of Heimaey, the mountainous shape appears to be formed mostly from basalt rock that has the uncanny appearance of wrinkled elephant skin. You can see few more shots over on Flickr. (thnx, Amber!)

 

 



History Photography

A Drought in Mexico Uncovers a 400-Year-Old Colonial Church in the Middle of a Reservoir

October 20, 2015

Johnny Strategy

Licensed from the AP / David von Blohn

Licensed from the AP / David von Blohn

Licensed from the AP / David von Blohn

Licensed from the AP / David von Blohn

Licensed from the AP / David von Blohn

Licensed from the AP / David von Blohn

Licensed from the AP / David von Blohn

Licensed from the AP / David von Blohn

Licensed from the AP / David von Blohn

Licensed from the AP / David von Blohn

Usually when droughts occur and reservoir water levels recede, it’s not a good thing. But a certain drought in Southern Mexico is attracting a lot of enthusiasm. Water levels in the Nezahualcoyotl reservoir have dropped by 82 ft (25 meters), revealing the remains of a mid-16th century colonial church. Known as the Temple of Santiago, the structure was erected by Dominican friars but then abandoned in the 1770s because of plagues.

The 48-ft tall church became a relic of memory in 1966 when the construction of a dam submerged it under water. Since then it’s only emerged twice: once in 2002 and again, now. As it did in 2002, the church has become a popular destination for tourists and local fisherman have been taking spectators out on boats to get a close-up view of the rare occurrence.

“The people celebrated,” recalls a local fisherman, of the last time the church emerged out of the water. “They came to eat, to hang out, to do business. I sold them fried fish.” If the drought continues, water levels could get low enough for people to walk inside the church.

Photos by David von Blohn, used with permission.

 

 



Art Design

Enigma: A Steampunk-Themed Cafe Filled with Kinetic Sculptures Opens in Romania

October 20, 2015

Christopher Jobson

Welp, now we’ve seen everything. Just last week, a new cafe opened in Romania called Enigma that claims to be “the world’s first kinetic steampunk bar.” We have no way to verify if that’s true, but it certainly looks impressive from these photos, if you’re into that sort of thing. A slightly terrifying humanoid robot with a plasma lamp cranium bicycles by the door, and a variety of kinetic artworks churn and rotate on both the ceiling and walls. Watch the video to take a peek inside, and if you’re in town you can visit Enigma Cafe at Enigma at Iuliu Maniu, Nr 12, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. Photos by Zoly Zelenyak from The 6th-Sense Interiors. (via Steampunk Tendencies)

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Amazing

Brilliant Breast Cancer Awareness Video Promotes Pride in Scars

October 20, 2015

Christopher Jobson

This wonderfully filmed short from Totuma uses a rapid series of visual metaphors to emphasize the humanity and even beauty inherent in the aftermath of a mastectomy. The short was created as part of a breast cancer awareness campaign on the LIFETIME TV network throughout Latin America. It’s an incredible testament to the filmmakers for creating something simultaneously humorous and strangely refreshing about such a challenging subject.

 

 



Art

Humorous Street Signs and Other Contextual Street Art Interventions by Michael Pederson

October 20, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Across the urban cityscape of Sydney, in parks, suburban streets, and industrial zones, you’re likely to encounter a plethora of signs and placards while going about your day: warnings, traffic regulations, helpful guides, and city services. But, look closer, and you might find an intervention by artist Michael Pederson who delights in creating humorous and thoughtful signs that blend into the city backdrop. Pederson makes use of pre-existing elements like park benches or abandoned furniture to share messages meant to snap a viewer out of their daily routine and see the world from a more contemplative or even childlike perspective, if only for a moment. You can see more of his installations dating back to 2012 on his Tumblr. (via Lustik, Junk Culture)

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A Colossal

Highlight

Animal Multi-Tool