Noise: A Visualization of Sound through Stop Motion 

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Nearly three years after sharing the trailer for their short film Noise, polish animators Katarzyna Kijek and Przemysław Adamski (previously here and here) have just released the full version online for the first time. The short was screened at more than 60 film festivals globally over the last few years, receiving numerous awards and accolades along the way. I won’t spoil it for you, but the innovative short explores the visualization of sound through stop motion animation. Via their website:

[Noise is] inspired by the theoretic work of George Berkeley and basics of synesthetic perception. It’s a game of imagination provoked by sound. Individual sounds penetrating into the apartment of the main character relieved of their visual designates evoke images distant from its origins.

You can see a few making of photos over on their blog. FYI: it gets a little dark.

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Desert Breath: A Monumental Land Art Installation in the Sahara Desert 

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Photo by D.A.ST. Arteam courtesy the artists

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Photo by D.A.ST. Arteam courtesy the artists

Located near the Red Sea in El Gouna, Egypt, Desert Breath is an impossibly immense land art installation dug into the sands of the Sahara desert by the D.A.ST. Arteam back in 1997. The artwork was a collaborative effort spanning two years between installation artist Danae Stratou, industrial designer Alexandra Stratou, and architect Stella Constantinides, and was meant as an exploration of infinity against the backdrop of the largest African desert. Covering an area of about 1 million square feet (100,000 square meters) the piece involved the displacement of 280,000 square feet (8,000 square meters) of sand and the creation of a large central pool of water.

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Photo by D.A.ST. Arteam courtesy the artists

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Photo by D.A.ST. Arteam courtesy the artists

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Photo by D.A.ST. Arteam courtesy the artists

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Photo by D.A.ST. Arteam courtesy the artists

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Photo by D.A.ST. Arteam courtesy the artists

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Photo by D.A.ST. Arteam courtesy the artists

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Photo by D.A.ST. Arteam courtesy the artists

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Photo by D.A.ST. Arteam courtesy the artists

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Photo by D.A.ST. Arteam courtesy the artists

Although it’s in a slow state of disintegration, Desert Breath remains viewable some 17 years after its completion, you can even see it in satellite images taken from Google Earth. You can learn more about the project in the video above or read about it here. (via Visual News, Synaptic Stimuli)

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Figurative Sculptures Welded from Steel Scraps by Jordi Diez Fernandez 

9-Rostro de Ildefonso CerdÖ
Monument a Ildefons Cerda

8- Ildefonso CerdÖ II.
Monument a Ildefons Cerda

10- Ildefonso CerdÖ. Detalle.
Monument a Ildefons Cerda

11- Ildefonso CerdÖ. Espalda
Monument a Ildefons Cerda

12- Ildefonso CerdÖ. Perfil.
Monument a Ildefons Cerda

13-Ildefons CerdÖ. Vista noct.
Monument a Ildefons Cerda

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Amantes de Acero

26- age quod agis
Age Quod Agis

32- El Umbral.
El Umbral

34- El Umbral.
El Umbral

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Barcelona-based sculptor Jordi Diez Fernandez works pimarily with welded steel fragments to create monumental human forms. His most recent piece is a tribute to civil engineer Ildefons Cerdà (top) who was largely responsible for designing the 19th-century extension of Barcelona called the Eixample, a memorial now on view in the municipality of Centelles. You can see much more of Fernandez’s work on his website and over on Behance.

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Old Technology Making Music: ‘Eye of the Tiger’ on a Dot Matrix Printer and ‘Tainted Love’ Played on Hard Drives 

I’m such a sucker for these clips of outmoded technology making music. In the first video by MIDIDesaster we listen as Eye of the Tiger by Survivor is played on a dot matrix printer. In the second video by Gigawipf, a box of hard drives plays ‘Tainted Love’ by Soft Cell. Gigawipf has dozens of other songs recorded with hard drives you can listen to here, and if you liked these you should also check out Polybius, and still my all-time favorite House of the Rising Sun which I managed to turn into a ringtone because I’m like that. (via Laughing Squid)

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Life and Death Animated through the Four Seasons in New Music Video for Chet Faker 

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In this superbly shot stop-motion music video for Chet Faker’s latest single Talk is Cheap, creative directors Toby and Pete create a striking visual of the four seasons. It gets a tad macabre at the end, but it’s still beautifully executed. If you liked this, check out Emma Allen’s makeup stop-motion short Ruby.

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Artist Aganetha Dyck Collaborates with Bees to Create Sculptures Wrapped in Honeycomb 

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Photo by William Eakin

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Photos by William Eakin

In North America, Europe and many other parts of the world, bee populations have plummeted 30-50% due to colony collapse disorder, a fact not lost on artist Aganetha Dyck who for years has been working with the industrious insects to create delicate sculptures using porcelain figurines, shoes, sports equipment, and other objects left in specially designed apiaries. As the weeks and months pass the ordinary objects are slowly transformed with the bees’ wax honeycomb. It’s almost impossible to look at final pieces without smiling in wonder, imagining the unwitting bees toiling away on a piece of art. And yet it’s our own ignorance of humanity’s connection to bees and nature that Dyck calls into question, two completely different life forms whose fate is inextricably intertwined.

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Born in Manitoba in 1937, the Canadian artist has long been interested in inter-species communication and her research has closely examined the the ramifications of honeybees disappearing from Earth. Working with the insects results in completely unexpected forms which can be surprising and even humorous. “They remind us that we and our constructions are temporary in relation to the lifespan of earth and the processes of nature,” comments curator Cathi Charles Wherry. “This raises ideas about our shared vulnerability, while at the same time elevating the ordinariness of our humanity.”

If you want to learn more I suggest watching the video above from the Confederation Centre of the Arts, and if you want to see her work up close Dyck opens an exhibition titled Honeybee Alterations at the Ottawa School of Art on March 3, 2014. A huge thanks to Gibson Gallery as well as Aganetha and Deborah Dyck for their help. All photos courtesy Peter Dyck and William Eakin.

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