Perceiving the Flow: Human Figures Composed of Unraveling Stainless Steel Ribbons by Gil Bruvel 












Though cast from bands of stainless steel ribbons, these figurative sculptures by Texas-based artist Gil Bruvel seem more fluid than solid, as if the wind could simply blow them apart. The works above are all part of the artist’s Flow series that he says are meant to reveal “an essential underlying fluidity that exists simultaneously within the physical, quantum, and metaphoric realms.” Bruvel was born in Sydney, Australia, in 1959 and he began learning the basics of sculpting at the age of nine before embarking on an artist career that now spans nearly 40 years. If you’re in San Francisco next month you can catch Bruvel’s work at Chloe Gallery starting June 30th, and you can see plenty more right here.

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Giant New Sound Installation by Zimoun Inside an Abandoned Chemical Tank 









Prolific sound artist Zimoun (previously here and here) has completed work on what may be his most ambitious project ever, a towering sound installation inside an abandoned toluene tank in Dottikon, Switzerland. The permanent installation uses 329 of the artist’s trademark prepared dc-motors and cotton balls that have been affixed to the inner tank walls, and relied on contributions from Hannes Zweifel Architecture, Davide Groppi, and many others. The result is a whirring, rhythmic soundscape that is completely camouflaged within an old factory. Via Zimoun’s artist statement:

Using simple and functional components, Zimoun builds architecturally-minded platforms of sound. Exploring mechanical rhythm and flow in prepared systems, his installations incorporate commonplace industrial objects. In an obsessive display of simple and functional materials, these works articulate a tension between the orderly patterns of Modernism and the chaotic forces of life. Carrying an emotional depth, the acoustic hum of natural phenomena in Zimoun’s minimalist constructions effortlessly reverberates.

Zimoun has completed several additional installations in the last few months, all of which can been seen on his website.

Update: In case you’re wondering here’s a behind-the-scenes video of how it all came together.

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Beers.Lambert Open Call for Contemporary Visions IV 


oskar proctor


Our friends at Beers.Lambert Contemporary in London have just announced an open call for their 4th Annual Open Exhibition, Contemporary Visions IV, an annual exhibition that seeks to identify current trends in contemporary art through the discovery and exhibition of artists working in all artistic disciplines. This is an excellent opportunity for artists of all backgrounds and mediums to exhibit in a vetted, curated group exhibition in the heart of London’s vibrant art community. One or more artist will be selected for a solo-exhibition.

The show will be juried by gallery director Kurt Beers, artist Andrew Salgado, the Chair of Collections at Contemporary Art Society, Cathy Wills, as well as yours truly. So I highly urge you to submit your work, the whole process takes place online and will be open through July 1. I’m extremely excited to be part of this process and look forward to seeing your art!

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The Beetle Sphere: An Actual 1953 VW Beetle Formed into a Perfect Sphere by Ichwan Noor 

See-ming Lee



This month marked a significant milestone for one of the world’s most famed art fairs as China hosted Art Basel Hong Kong for the first time. With over half of the galleries exhibiting at the fair originating from Asia and Asia-Pacific, Art Basel shined a bright international light on hundreds of artists who were relatively unknown outside of their respective regions.

One such artist was Jakatara-based sculptor Ichwan Noor with Mondecor Jakarta who arrived with this giant sculpture of a 1953 Volkswagen Beetle that, combined with polyester and aluminum, has been morphed into a perfect sphere. Apparently this is one in a series of spherical (and cubical!) vehicles by the artist, but he also works in a variety of other subjects including anatomical forms. To see more coverage of Art Basel Hong Kong, head over to Juxtapoz that has two galleries of photos, Part 1 and Part 2. (via Japan Times, See-ming Lee)

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Wonderful Conceptual Photo-manipulations by 14-Year-Old Photographer “Fiddle Oak” 







Today I discovered a photographer who has a camera named Betsy who tells me he’s been taking photographs for nearly six years. Y’know, since he was 8. I’m referring to Massachusetts-based photographer Fiddle Oak (his real name is Zev) who creates some impressive miniature photo-manipulations that he’s been sharing online with a growing audience for the last few years. Many of the images are a collaboration with Zev’s 18-year-old sister Nellie who helps with concepts and setup but all of the shooting and editing is done by Zev who is also frequently the subject of his own work. Somebody get this kid a scholarship to something. You can find much more of his work over on Flickr. (via david is going to die)

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30 Hour Drawing Time-lapse by Paul White 



I love to watch artists work and this time-lapse video by Australian artist Paul White white is no exception. Filmed by Johnny Blank over 30 hours it captures White working on a pencil drawing of a single wrecked vehicle, a theme of transportation meets decay that plays a prominent role in much of his artwork. The video was shown as part of a recent presentation at Semi-Permanent in Sydney earlier this month and is best viewed full-screen with HD turned on so you can see the finer details. See much more of his work here.

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Wooden Illusions: Incredibly Lifelike Objects Carved from Wood by Tom Eckert 










Arizona-based artist Tom Eckert creates incredibly lifelike sculptures out of little more than wood, paint and patience. Working primarily with basswood, linden and limewood that is then coated with fine layers of lacquer paint, the artist can create realistic wrinkles in fabric or reflections that are almost impossible to discern from the real thing. Eckert says of his work:

Forms carved to suggest cloth recur in many of my pieces. By tradition, cloth has been widely used to conceal and shroud objects in practices ranging from advertising to church rituals. Covered forms are often more evocative – with a sense of mystery absent from the uncovered object by itself. I remember in church one Lent, as a child, being mystified while gazing at the statues shrouded with purple cloth.

You can watch the video above to learn more about his technique or explore his online galleries to see much more. If you liked this, also check out the work of Randall Rosenthal. (via twisted sifter)

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