Photography

Surreal Aerial Views of Fish Farms Captured by Bernhard Lang

July 13, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Flying in a helicopter high above the coast of Greece, German photographer Bernhard Lang captures unusual networks of circular fish farms. The strange, ovoid enclosures appear like abstract geometric designs, hardly related to the thriving ecosystems of fish that lay just below the surface. Aquaculture is seen by many as a more efficient way to safely breed larger volumes of fish instead of harvesting wild populations, but concerns about the environmental impact near farming sites have raised a lot of questions.

“Greece’s aquaculture industry is important for the country,” Lang shares with Colossal. “Especially [because of] the bad economic situation in Greece. Fish, mainly sea bass and sea bream is one of their biggest agricultural exports, next to olive oil.” That said, fish prices have fallen sharply in recent years, further threatening a burgeoning industry.

Lang is known for his aerial studies of industry, wildlife, and landscapes around the world including a recent series of harbors in the Philippines and a colorful collection of beach umbrellas in the Italian resort town of Adria. You can follow more of his recent photography on Behance and Instagram.

 

 



Animation Art

Perspective: Hilariously Shortened Vehicles and Other Edited Oddities Race Around a City’s Streets

July 12, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Fernando Livschitz of Black Sheep Films (previously) edits everyday footage in order to add a touch of the bizarre to mundane scenes. In his most recent short film he imagines a world where certain vehicles have been hilariously shortened, landing tiny planes on one wheel, and racing single-car trains along a track. In addition to these edited vehicles, he removes horses and bikes from their riders, making it seems as if jockeys and bicyclists are effortlessly floating through the world. You can see more of Livschitz’s short films, many of which are Vimeo staff picks, on his website.

 

 



Photography

The Serendipitous Clouds and Faux Reflections of Photographer Kanghee Kim

July 12, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Photographer Kanghee Kim juxtaposes day-to-day moments to create scenes that peek into an alternate world, subtly placing faux reflections in coils of cable or in the streak of a rear windshield. The Brooklyn-based photographer’s manipulations come from the desire to manifest magical moments in the mundane, using post-production edits as an additional artistic medium within her work.

“I started to think of [my photography] as a painting and allow the post-production process to act as a kind of mark-making,” said Kanghee to i-D. “Photoshop is widely used in commercial photography to refine the details and make the images look flawless.”

Kanghee decided that she wanted to do the opposite with the tool, keeping the flaws that appeared in her images rather than editing them out. The works’ small imperfections highlight the human quality of each combined moment rather than glossing over it. You can view more of the photographer’s softly edited images and unexpected reflections on her website and Instagram. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 



Photography

The Dr. Seuss-Like Topiaries of San Francisco Photographed by Kelsey McClellan

July 12, 2017

Christopher Jobson

While walking through her neighborhood in San Francisco’s Outer Sunset neighborhood, photographer Kelsey McClellan (previously) is always surprised to discover the unusual foliage adorning her neighbor’s yards. Trees meticulously trimmed into vertical stacks of pom-poms, plants that swirl like ice cream cones, or branches that span garage doors like a giant green mustaches—all practically lifted from the pages of a Dr. Seuss book.

“I was instantly drawn to all the topiaries in people’s front ‘lawns’ and started snapping them as I walked around the neighborhood,” she shares with Colossal. “Most are Hollywood Junipers that have been shaped for decades by the owners.” You can see more of her botanical observations on Instagram.

 

 



Amazing Art

CTRL+X: Street Artists “Delete” Graffiti with a Painted Anamorphic Illusion

July 11, 2017

Christopher Jobson

All photos © Anna Christova

As part of the Stenograffia street art and graffiti festival in Russia, a collaborative of artists worked to create this phenomenal illusion that appears to “erase” a collection of graffiti from a small car and trash dumpster. With the help of a projector, the team painted the familiar grey and white checker grid found in most graphics applications that denotes a deleted or transparent area. The piece is titled “CTRL+X” in reference to the keyboard command in Photoshop for deleting a selection. You can see nearly 100 behind-the-scenes photos of their process here. (via The Awesomer, Mass Appeal)

 

 



Art History

Text SFMOMA Your Favorite Emoji and Receive an Artwork From Their Vast Collection

July 11, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art's newest tech tool allows any smartphone user to gain access to the artworks hidden behind their archive doors, a collection so large that it would stretch 121.3 miles if you placed each artwork end-to-end. With only 5% of this collection on view, the museum decided to create Send Me SFMOMA, a texting service that delivers an artwork to your phone based on a sent emoji or phrase. For example, the first emoji I decided to text was a goat, for which they return Takuma Nakahira's 2008 Untitled image of—you guessed it, a goat.

To participate, text the number 572-51 the words “send me” followed by either a keyword (such as a color, emotion, or type of art) or an emoji. A quick response will bring your phone an image of an artwork from SFMOMA’s vast collection, in addition to a caption containing the artist, artwork title, and year. Within the first four days of the program over 3,000 artworks were generated, a larger number than the amount of works currently on view.

The system isn’t perfect, more of my inquiries came back with an error message than an artwork, however the intrigue of seeing a piece that has been tucked away from the public is quite addicting. I especially loved seeing what some of my most used emojis resulted in, such as the single eye which brought Tomoko Sawada's Early Days (1996) to my inbox. (via Hyperallergic)

 

 



Amazing Art

Where Do Ideas Come From? A Short Film by Andrew Norton Tackles the Nature of Inspiration

July 10, 2017

Christopher Jobson

This new short film from filmmaker Andrew Norton tackles the nebulous origins of inspiration. Does a good idea strike like a bolt of lightning, or does it emerge from a soup of random ingredients cooked at just the right temperature? In a series of brief interviews with writers, artists, kids, and other creatives including the likes of Chuck Close and Susan Orlean, we get personal perspectives on where the best ideas originate. If you liked this, also check out Norton’s previous film: How to Age Gracefully. Where Do Ideas Come From? was presented by Transom with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)