Chicago in the Fog by Michael Salisbury

Chicago in the Fog by Michael Salisbury fog cityscapes Chicago

Chicago in the Fog by Michael Salisbury fog cityscapes Chicago

Chicago in the Fog by Michael Salisbury fog cityscapes Chicago

Chicago in the Fog by Michael Salisbury fog cityscapes Chicago

Chicago in the Fog by Michael Salisbury fog cityscapes Chicago

Chicago in the Fog by Michael Salisbury fog cityscapes Chicago

Local photographer Michael Salisbury snapped some excellent photos of the fog swallowing Chicago this summer. You can see more over on his Flickr stream and on Instagram. Some of these are available as prints on Crated.

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New Vintage Porcelain Dishes Crawling with Hand-Painted Ants by Evelyn Bracklow

New Vintage Porcelain Dishes Crawling with Hand Painted Ants by Evelyn Bracklow porcelain insects ceramics

New Vintage Porcelain Dishes Crawling with Hand Painted Ants by Evelyn Bracklow porcelain insects ceramics

New Vintage Porcelain Dishes Crawling with Hand Painted Ants by Evelyn Bracklow porcelain insects ceramics

New Vintage Porcelain Dishes Crawling with Hand Painted Ants by Evelyn Bracklow porcelain insects ceramics

New Vintage Porcelain Dishes Crawling with Hand Painted Ants by Evelyn Bracklow porcelain insects ceramics

New Vintage Porcelain Dishes Crawling with Hand Painted Ants by Evelyn Bracklow porcelain insects ceramics

New Vintage Porcelain Dishes Crawling with Hand Painted Ants by Evelyn Bracklow porcelain insects ceramics

New Vintage Porcelain Dishes Crawling with Hand Painted Ants by Evelyn Bracklow porcelain insects ceramics

New Vintage Porcelain Dishes Crawling with Hand Painted Ants by Evelyn Bracklow porcelain insects ceramics

German artist Evelyn Bracklow of La Philie has created an entire new collection of ant-covered porcelain dishes and tableware since we first shared her work here early this year. Many of the new pieces are part of a unique partnership between the artist, Rijks Museum in the Netherlands, and Etsy. The pieces are hand-painted in Bracklow’s studio, signed, numbered and fired to 160 degrees. As unsettling as having insects permanently invading your dinnerware is, I can’t help but be enchanted by how perfectly crafted they are. You can see more of Bracklow’s recent work here.

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Hu Shaoming’s Mechanical Sculptures of Time and Civilization

Hu Shaoming’s Mechanical Sculptures of Time and Civilization telephones sea China cameras

Hu Shaoming’s Mechanical Sculptures of Time and Civilization telephones sea China cameras

Hu Shaoming’s Mechanical Sculptures of Time and Civilization telephones sea China cameras

Hu Shaoming’s Mechanical Sculptures of Time and Civilization telephones sea China cameras

Hu Shaoming’s Mechanical Sculptures of Time and Civilization telephones sea China cameras

Hu Shaoming’s Mechanical Sculptures of Time and Civilization telephones sea China cameras

Hu Shaoming’s Mechanical Sculptures of Time and Civilization telephones sea China cameras

Hu Shaoming’s Mechanical Sculptures of Time and Civilization telephones sea China cameras

Hu Shaoming’s Mechanical Sculptures of Time and Civilization telephones sea China cameras

Hu Shaoming is a young Chinese sculptor and graduate of Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts. With a deft mastery of metal he creates intricate sculptures that are surreal and dreamlike, but also somewhat cautionary. As part of his city series Shaoming created a mechanical seahorse that appears submerged in water. The exposed top of its head is burdened by a beautiful, metallic civilization, creating a fascinating and treacherous balance between man and nature.

In a different series on time Shaoming appropriates artifacts of industrial civilization like old cameras and telephones. Effectively destroying the mechanism, he disassembles them and then rebuilds them but with a zipper that offers glimpses into what makes them tick. You can see more of his work over on the Chinese portfolio site Jue.so. (via Steampunk Tendencies)

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Aerial Adria: An Italian Beach Resort Photographed from Above by Bernhard Lang

Aerial Adria: An Italian Beach Resort Photographed from Above by Bernhard Lang multiples Italy beach aerial

Aerial Adria: An Italian Beach Resort Photographed from Above by Bernhard Lang multiples Italy beach aerial

Aerial Adria: An Italian Beach Resort Photographed from Above by Bernhard Lang multiples Italy beach aerial

Aerial Adria: An Italian Beach Resort Photographed from Above by Bernhard Lang multiples Italy beach aerial

Aerial Adria: An Italian Beach Resort Photographed from Above by Bernhard Lang multiples Italy beach aerial

Aerial Adria: An Italian Beach Resort Photographed from Above by Bernhard Lang multiples Italy beach aerial

Aerial Adria: An Italian Beach Resort Photographed from Above by Bernhard Lang multiples Italy beach aerial

Aerial Adria: An Italian Beach Resort Photographed from Above by Bernhard Lang multiples Italy beach aerial

Aerial Adria: An Italian Beach Resort Photographed from Above by Bernhard Lang multiples Italy beach aerial

Several years ago, Munich-based photographer Bernhard Lang vacationed at a seaside resort in Adria, Italy and was struck by the perfectly uniform arrangements of colored umbrellas used by each hotel. Last month he returned, this time by air, and shot for several hours on the coastline between Ravenna and Rimini. Lang is well known for his aerial photography of locations around Germany including coal mines, residential life, and industrial sites. You can see more over on Behance, and all of his work is available as fine art prints. All photos courtesy the photographer. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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A Rube Goldberg Machine Powered by Light and Magnifying Glasses

This slick commercial for Japanese high-speed optical internet service au Hikari has a pretty novel take on the Rube Goldberg Machine. Each sequence in the device is powered (or otherwise set in motion) by a single beam of light sent through magnifying glasses and mirrors to burn strings, pop balloons, and melt bits of ice. Even if you’re Rube Goldberg’d out lately, this is worth a watch. (via The Kid Should See This)

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New Backlit Paper Sculptures by Hari & Deepti

New Backlit Paper Sculptures by Hari & Deepti sculpture paper light

As part of a new exhibition at Black Book Gallery in Denver, artists Deepti Nair and Harikrishnan Panicker (aka. Hari & Deepti), have created a new body of work titled “Oh, The Places You Will Go!” The artist couple were inspired by recent travels through Moab, Utah and Yellowstone, Wyoming, and transformed elements of their adventures into delicately hand-cut paper sculptures infused with mythology and science fiction. Each piece is lit from behind or below with LED strips and the boxes are exhibited in dark rooms to enhance the effect.

Most recently Hari & Deepti completed a commission for Neil Patrick Harris titled “The Magicians Hat” inspired by the “Rabbit in the Moon” legend, shown below. They will also have work on view at Art Basel Miami 2014 with Scope International Contemporary Art Show.

We’ve been huge fans of Hari & Deepti here on Colossal since first encountering their work early this year. It’s with great honor that we currently have a few of their sculptures gracing the masthead of this very website. You can see several more of their recent light box sculptures at Black Book Gallery and follow their ongoing work on Instagram.

New Backlit Paper Sculptures by Hari & Deepti sculpture paper light

New Backlit Paper Sculptures by Hari & Deepti sculpture paper light

New Backlit Paper Sculptures by Hari & Deepti sculpture paper light

New Backlit Paper Sculptures by Hari & Deepti sculpture paper light

New Backlit Paper Sculptures by Hari & Deepti sculpture paper light

New Backlit Paper Sculptures by Hari & Deepti sculpture paper light

New Backlit Paper Sculptures by Hari & Deepti sculpture paper light

New Backlit Paper Sculptures by Hari & Deepti sculpture paper light

New Backlit Paper Sculptures by Hari & Deepti sculpture paper light

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A mesmerizing pendulum wave demonstration with 16 bowling balls in a North Carolina forest

A mesmerizing pendulum wave demonstration with 16 bowling balls in a North Carolina forest video physics math kinetic sculpture

If you’ve ever been to a science museum or taken a physics class, you’ve probably encountered an example of a pendulum wave. This video shows a large-scale pendulum wave contraption built on private property in the mountains of North Carolina, near Burnsville. The mechanism relies on 16 precisely hung bowling balls on a wooden frame that swing in hypnotic patterns for a cycle of about 2 minute and 40 seconds. Via Maria Ikenberry who filmed the clip:

The length of time it takes a ball to swing back and forth one time to return to its starting position is dependent on the length of the pendulum, not the mass of the ball. A longer pendulum will take longer to complete one cycle than a shorter pendulum. The lengths of the pendula in this demonstration are all different and were calculated so that in about 2:40, the balls all return to the same position at the same time – in that 2:40, the longest pendulum (in front) will oscillate (or go back and forth) 50 times, the next will oscillate 51 times, and on to the last of the 16 pendula which will oscillate 65 times.

Because the piece is outdoors, a number of factors prevent the balls from precisely lining up at the end, but it’s still easy to get the idea. In a perfectly controlled environment you get something like this.

Update: The pendulum was built by Appalachian State University teacher and artist Jeff Goodman.

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