Design Food

Dizzying Geometric Pies and Tarts by Lauren Ko

February 7, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Lauren Ko brings mathematical precision to her baking, using elaborate intertwined patterns to form transfixing patterns to the top of her homemade pies and tarts. The Seattle-based amateur baker has been piecrafting for just a couple of years, she tells Mic, and if you’re wondering, this is her favorite pie crust recipe. Ko combines classic crusts with colorful fillings like blueberries, kumquats, purple sweet potatoes, and pluots to create her visually striking sweets. You can follow her on Instagram.

 

 



Art

A Series of Ordinary Humans and Creatures Trapped Within Their Pop Culture Depictions

February 7, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Netherlands-based artist Super A (previously here and here) has a new series of painting and sculpture that explores the truth behind fantasy, slicing through pop culture figures to examine the reality that lays at their core. Trapped features characters such as Tweety, Mickey Mouse, Snow White and even Ronald McDonald as their recognizable features unfurl like ribbons, revealing realistically formed birds, mice, and people caught inside.

The series intends to address our skewed perception of reality through easily digestible cartoons, demonstrating that there can be no objectivity when it comes to our daily view of the world. A certain lens is always employed, a myth disguises the harsh truths.

“Nowadays the most dominant myths we have embraced as an warm blanket of truth are liberty, property and individualism,” said Super A. “We tend to see these as absolute objective truths which suit the best interests of all humanity. But aren’t we just trapped within our cozy reality? And if it’s cozy… Should we even dare to break free?”

Super A has shown works from the series in a variety of exhibitions. The Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck paintings were recently shown at Vertical Gallery's group exhibition Portrait, Tweety is on view at Pow! Wow! Exploring the New Contemporary Art Movement curated by Thinkspace Gallery at the Honolulu Museum of Art, and Snow White and Pierrot will be shown at an upcoming exhibition with Galerie Droste.

“Pierrot,” 2018. 65 cm x 60 cm x 30 cm. Polyester, epoxy, resin, enamel paint.

 

 



Illustration Photography

New Flower Arrangements Formed Into Exotic Butterflies and Moths by Raku Inoue

February 6, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Montreal-based fashion designer and creative Raku Inoue (previously) continues his Natura Insects series with a focus on brilliantly colored moths and butterflies. The delicate insects were created from seasonal leaves and blooms, with pastel petals and green leaves composing those made in late summer, and warmer tones and brown leaves forming the works made in mid-fall.

The artist learned the importance of utilizing seasonal materials while studying the art of Ikebana—the Japanese art of floral arrangement. This training taught Inoue to respect the nature he works with and only use what is most abundant, rather than focusing on what might look most attractive. Often after a rain he will collect the petals that have fallen to the ground, using these naturally-provided elements rather than searching for flowers still connected to their tree or stem.

You can see more arrangements from his continuing series on Instagram.

 

 



Design

Japanese-Designed Public Restrooms in the Shape of Fish, Crabs, Tree Stumps

February 6, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Flickr user and photographer Okinawa Soba (Rob) has been documenting the obscure designs of public restroom facilities on the Japanese island of Okinawa for the last six years. Rob has lived on the island, which is home to 1.3 million residents, for nearly 43 years, and has had the chance to explore some of the stranger bathrooms the prefecture has to offer. Included in this group is a koi-shaped bathroom which asks guests to enter through the mouth, a sliced orange, a stubby trunk with windows that have replaced its missing branches, and a robotic crab. You can see more of Rob’s unique Japanese finds (including these Okinawa manhole covers) on his photostream. (via Web Urbanist)

 

 



Art Design

Black and White Figural Tattoos With a Macabre Twist by Korean Tattoo Artist Oozy

February 5, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

South Korean tattoo artist Woojin Choi, or Oozy, creates detailed black and white works which often incorporate a macabre twist. His fine line tattoos explore scenes that are not as innocent as they first appear, such as a geisha who partially hides her own skeleton behind a decorative fan, and a figure who is being lifted from (or dropped into) a bowl of Chashu ramen.

Oozy’s pieces are often very line-oriented, an effect that resonates with the appearance of classic woodblock prints. The tattoo artist also associates this aesthetic with his background in animation, a subject he is currently majoring in at school. You can see more of the South Korea-based artist’s work on his Instagram.

 

 



Art

Nora Fok’s Ethereal Hand-Knit Jewelry is Inspired by Nature and Science

February 5, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Nora Fok combines jewelry design with textile art in her science- and math-inspired wearable artworks. Fok, who is based in southeast England, works in her home studio creating all of her pieces manually, using hand tools, fine nylon microfilament and basic processes like weaving, knitting, braiding, and knotting. The work above is comprised of 3,500 knit spheres, and finished pieces can take weeks to produce. The artist describes her inspiration on her website:

She is intrigued by the world around her; she also asks questions and tries to find answers to them. She is fascinated by different aspects of nature, structure, systems and order, and the mysteries and magic which she sets out to capture in her work.

Fok has artwork that is currently being shown in the Jewelry of Ideas exhibit at the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum in New York City, which is up through May 2018, and she shares exhibition dates and a small archive of jewelry on her website. If you like Nora’s work, also check out Mariko Kusumoto.

 

 



Photography

A Photographer Captures a Decade in the Life of a Single Ukrainian Park Bench

February 5, 2018

Christopher Jobson

All photos © Yevgeniy Kotenko, shared with permission.

One of the most ubiquitous sights in any city around the world is the humble park bench: a meeting spot for friends, a place to grab lunch or perhaps a smoke, and maybe a quick snooze. Usually such mundane activities fade easily into the background of our busy lives and we would hardly stop to notice the goings on around a small public meeting spot, but for Ukrainian photographer Yevgeniy Kotenko, one such bench has turned into rich body of photography spanning over a decade titled On the Bench.

Starting in 2007, Kotenko began to shoot a local park bench outside the window of his parent’s fourth-floor kitchen window in Kiev. Sandwiched between a children’s playground and a walking path, the area proved to be a hotspot of colorful characters. Alcoholics, families, and lovers all congregate on the exact same bench during different times of the day, and when observed with Kotenko’s patient eye an almost Shakespearean drama begins to emerge over a decade of photos.

“I wasn’t thinking of making a series or a project,” shares Kotenko with Colossal through a translator. “I didn’t select any particular time frame or set of situations to capture. Not until 2012 did my friends tell me that I should put together an exhibition of these photos.”

The stark contrast in situations—from a picnic table to an impromtu emergency room—results in a fascinating documentary in the lives of local residents and passersby. “I never invested the photos with any particular intention or idea of what I wanted my audience to see,” Kotenko adds. “They will see what they want to see. These photographs are more like a documentary.”

You can see dozens more photos from the On the Bench series on Facebook, and you can follow Kotenko on Instagram. Thank you to Jen Carroll for contributing to this piece. (via Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty)