Art

Lisa Ericson Imagines Fantastical Ecosystems Carried on the Backs of Turtles

August 28, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

“Migration,” acrylic on wood panel, 12″ x 16″

Portland, Oregon-based artist Lisa Ericson blends her hyperreallist painting style with a vivid imagination, resulting in fantastical combinations of plants and animals. Ericson tends to focus on one specific flora/fauna combination at a time, like hybrid mouserflies or coral fish. Her most recent series, Mobile Habitats, highlights turtles that support small ecosystems on their shells. From mossy knolls surrounded by fireflies to gnarled trees leafed with monarchs, each turtle-world evokes a specific time and place.

Ericson chronicles her work on Instagram, where she shares, “these pieces are all about turtles and what they can carry on those amazing half-a-globe shells, and about things that need saving.”

The acrylic-on-panel paintings are featured in her solo show, currently on view at Antler Gallery. All of the originals have already sold, but the gallery is offering a limited edition of 50 full-sized, signed and numbered prints.

“Island,” acrylic on panel, 12″ x 12″

“Carrier,” acrylic on panel, 16″ x 12″

“Raft,” acrylic on panel, 12″ x 12″

“Terrarium,” acrylic on panel, 12″ x 12″

“Migration II,” acrylic on panel, 12″ x 16″

 

 



Sponsor

Presenting Gil Bruvel’s “Corso Zundert,” a Documentary About the World’s Largest Flower Parade (Sponsor)

August 28, 2017

Colossal

Premiering on Colossal, CORSO ZUNDERT is a film about the people of Zundert — a village in the South of Holland — who collaborate to create extravagant, flower-covered floats on a monumental scale for “the largest corso in the world.” The short film follows award-winning artist Gil Bruvel as he discovers this unique community and what drives them to carry on this 80-year tradition of collaboration with their neighbors to create spectacular art for art’s sake.

Each float is designed and built by residents from twenty different neighborhood teams (Buurtschapen) who volunteer their time and energy to compete and innovate every year. Bruvel was contacted by two Dutch designers who were greatly inspired by Bruvel’s own Flow Series. Bruvel was humbled and excited to witness this process in person; bringing a camera crew along to capture the experience.

Produced by POTLUCK Arts + Music, CORSO ZUNDERT captures the brilliance of a rich, and virtually unknown tradition that honors innovation, dedication and community. Viewers are taken into a new world and experience a stimulating visual journey through the painstaking mental and physical labors of construction, to the joys of community collaboration and the lessons learned from a fleeting, season-long process.

Bruvel, who was previously featured on Colossal, said “It was an amazing opportunity to expand my horizons because of the sheer scope of being part of something bigger than any of us as individuals.”

Corso Zundert has also been previously featured on Colossal in 2016 and 2015, 2014, 2013 and 2012.

This year’s corso is on September 3rd and 4th in Zundert in the south of the Netherlands.

(photo courtesy Corso Zundert)

This post was sponsored by Bruvel, film produced by POTLUCK Arts + Music.

 

 



Art

A Giant Worm-like Sculpture Loops Its Way Through the Worcester Museum

August 28, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Shih Chieh Huang, “Organic Concept” at the Worcester Art Museum (photograph by Kim Noonan; image © Worcester Art Museum)

Shih Chieh Huang, “Organic Concept” at the Worcester Art Museum (photograph by Kim Noonan; image © Worcester Art Museum)

For the final iteration of his performance series Organic Concept, artist Shih Chieh Huang filled the Renaissance Court of the Worcester Art Museum with a gigantic worm-like sculpture. The work loops its way around the room’s staircases and columns, pulsing with the pressure of several box fans that keep the structure alive. For the last 15 years he has filled gardens, roadways, and malls with similar pieces, allowing rolled painter’s plastic to flail its way through each space it inhabits.

This particular installation was created for his recent solo show at the museum titled Reusable Universes: Shih Chieh Huang. Similar to the intestine-shaped sculpture, the pieces within his exhibition are made from common materials. Huang transforms ubiquitous objects into novel and complex forms, creating kinetic works that whir, blink, and subtly change colors in the museum’s darkened gallery.

“Sometimes when I look at these pieces,” Huang explained to Artnet about his installation, “I just see trash bags and fans, controlled in a certain way so that they’re moving; it’s very straightforward. But sometimes, I think that’s a cell, heart, a lung, a sea creature. I don’t want to tell the viewer how they should be looking.”

The installation is his most ambitious yet, with over one hundred various components. Formed mostly from plastic, the sculptures are not a comment on sustainable practices, but rather an exploration of the mechanical properties of each of his sourced gadgets. He hopes his low-tech works inspired a curiosity for experimentation in his audience, one akin to tinkering with modes of early technology.

Reusable Universes: Shih Chieh Huang will run through November 12, 2017 at the Worcester Art Museum in Massachusetts. You can hear him speak more about the connections between his mechanical creations and undersea life in a TED talk below. (via Hyperallergic)

Shih Chieh Huang, “Organic Concept” at the Worcester Art Museum (photograph by Kim Noonan; image © Worcester Art Museum)

Shih Chieh Huang, “Organic Concept” at the Worcester Art Museum (photograph by Kim Noonan; image © Worcester Art Museum)

Image © Worcester Art Museum Facebook

Image © Worcester Art Museum Facebook

Shih Chieh Huang, T-24-L, 2017, 8 x 13 x 9 feet, Mixed media, photo: Megan Paetzhold, Courtesy of the artist and Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, New York

Shih Chieh Huang, T-24-L, 2017, 8 x 13 x 9 feet, Mixed media, photo: Megan Paetzhold, Courtesy of the artist and Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, New York

Shih Chieh Huang, VT-36, 2017, 10 x 10 x 12 feet, mixed media (L), VT-34-BTB (red angel eye), 2017, 12 x 13 x 3 feet, mixed media (R) photos: Megan Paetzhold, Courtesy of the artist and Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, New York

Shih Chieh Huang, VT-36, 2017, 10 x 10 x 12 feet, mixed media (L), VT-34-BTB (red angel eye), 2017, 12 x 13 x 3 feet, mixed media (R) photos: Megan Paetzhold, Courtesy of the artist and Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, New York

Shih Chieh Huang, Reusable Universes, installation view (image © Worcester Art Museum)

Shih Chieh Huang, Reusable Universes, installation view (image © Worcester Art Museum)

Shih Chieh Huang, Reusable Universes, installation view (image © Worcester Art Museum)

Shih Chieh Huang, Reusable Universes, installation view (image © Worcester Art Museum)

Shih Chieh Huang, Reusable Universes, installation view (image © Worcester Art Museum)

Shih Chieh Huang, Reusable Universes, installation view (image © Worcester Art Museum)

Shih Chieh Huang, “Organic Concept” at the Worcester Art Museum (photograph by Kim Noonan; image © Worcester Art Museum)

Shih Chieh Huang, “Organic Concept” at the Worcester Art Museum (photograph by Kim Noonan; image © Worcester Art Museum)

 

 



Art

Elegant Flameworked Glass Sculptures by Eunsuh Choi

August 28, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Like a house of cards or a precariously stacked pile of pick-up sticks, it’s a marvel to stare at Eunsuh Choi‘s glass sculptures and wonder how each object doesn’t collapse under its own weight. One of the central themes of her artistic practice—both in metaphor and execution—is the idea of ambition, specifically how an individual is willing to push past barriers and risk failure in the pursuit of success.

“My work specifically focuses on communicating the graceful flow of our emotional tendencies through the plastic medium of flameworked glass,” she shares with Habitat. “I like to work sculpturally, utilizing form and its surrounding atmosphere to portray narratives based on the human encounter with success and failure in the pursuit of personal ambition.”

Choi sculpts primarily through a process called flameworking where thin borosilicate glass rods are heated with a torch and carefully bent to form the lattice-like structures that are stronger than they first appear. You can see more of Choi’s work at Gallery Sklo and Habitat Fine Art.

 

 



Art

Towering Charcoal Portraits of Women by Clio Newton

August 28, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Swiss artist Clio Newton has been hard at work on a series of larger-than-life portraits of women portrayed entirely with compressed charcoal. The towering drawings can reach nearly 8 feet tall and capture near photographic detail of her subject’s faces, hair, and bodies. Several of the new portraits will be on view in an upcoming show at Benjamin Eck Galerie in Munich titled ‘Realism‘ that opens September 14, 2017. You can read an interview with Newton on Quiet Lunch and see more of her recent work and studio photos on Instagram. (via Supersonic Electronic, Gaks Designs)

 

 



Animation Art

Angular Geometry: Colorful Daily GIFs from the Mind of Tyler Haywood

August 25, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Over four years ago, designer Tyler Haywood started posting GIFs on Tumblr under the name Angular Geometry. Haywood liked the process so much, he’s never stopped posting, creating a new custom GIF for his blog every single day. The GIFs are related to his interest in motion graphics, focusing on the tiny but captivating movements of Rubik’s Cube-like structures, rippling water, and dazzling rainbows.

“I have always thought of Angular Geometry as a sketchbook,” Haywood shares with Colossal. “Just open it up and see what happens. Every day is a fresh start, so there is no need to worry all that much. Sometimes I will scroll through my archive of over 1500 GIFs and see patterns or ideas that come through in my art that I didn’t realize were there in the moment of creation. It is an interesting catalog of my subconscious in some ways.”

His digital “sketchbook” just celebrated its four year anniversary, making him officially the longest running daily GIF artist on Tumblr. You can see more of his GIFs on his site Angular Geometry.

 

 



Craft Design

The Painstaking 12-Month Process of Crafting a Traditional Korean Inlaid Lacquer Box

August 25, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

This four and a half minute-long video from Victoria & Albert Museum condenses the twelve months of meticulous labor that are required to make a traditional Korean inlaid lacquer box. Featuring skilled craftsman Lee Kwang-Woong, the video shows each of the many steps, starting with harvesting sap from a lacquer tree, and including fret sawing, charcoal polishing, and lacquer curing. Although we’re just spectators in the process, the behind-the-scenes footage makes the final product shots that much more satisfying. (via Core77)

 

 

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