An Edible Zen Rock Garden Made From Japanese Sweets

An Edible Zen Rock Garden Made From Japanese Sweets zen rocks Japan gardening food candy

An Edible Zen Rock Garden Made From Japanese Sweets zen rocks Japan gardening food candy

An Edible Zen Rock Garden Made From Japanese Sweets zen rocks Japan gardening food candy

An Edible Zen Rock Garden Made From Japanese Sweets zen rocks Japan gardening food candy

Zen rock gardens are typically composed of carefully placed rocks, surrounded by sand that is raked to represent water ripples. They’re supposed to inspire a meditative state of calm and relaxation. They’re not supposed to inspire hunger and a sudden urge to put it in your mouth. Except this one does because it’s made of entirely edible ingredients. “In cities today, people do not have the luxury of gazing at gardens,” says Japanese designer Tomonori Saito, lamenting the loss of one his nation’s most relaxing pastimes. So he decided to create “Shin-an-ji Rock Garden” made from black sesame (the rocks) and sugar (the sand). Now you can have your garden and eat it too. (syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

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Iceland Infrared: Stark Photographs of Icelandic Landscapes by Andy Lee

Iceland Infrared: Stark Photographs of Icelandic Landscapes by Andy Lee landscapes infrared Iceland

Iceland Infrared: Stark Photographs of Icelandic Landscapes by Andy Lee landscapes infrared Iceland

Iceland Infrared: Stark Photographs of Icelandic Landscapes by Andy Lee landscapes infrared Iceland

Iceland Infrared: Stark Photographs of Icelandic Landscapes by Andy Lee landscapes infrared Iceland

Iceland Infrared: Stark Photographs of Icelandic Landscapes by Andy Lee landscapes infrared Iceland

Iceland Infrared: Stark Photographs of Icelandic Landscapes by Andy Lee landscapes infrared Iceland

Iceland Infrared: Stark Photographs of Icelandic Landscapes by Andy Lee landscapes infrared Iceland

Iceland Infrared: Stark Photographs of Icelandic Landscapes by Andy Lee landscapes infrared Iceland

Iceland Infrared: Stark Photographs of Icelandic Landscapes by Andy Lee landscapes infrared Iceland

Iceland Infrared: Stark Photographs of Icelandic Landscapes by Andy Lee landscapes infrared Iceland

Iceland, with its extreme landscapes, jagged lava fields and Northern Lights, is arguably one of the most photogenic countries in the world. So it’s no surprise that over half a million tourists flock there every year to shoot the landscape. But UK-based photographer Andy Lee, on his first visit to the country, came back with a series of photos titled “Blue Iceland” that captured the waterfalls, peaks and roads in, literally, a whole new light. Using infrared photography to pick up invisible light rather than visible light, Lee transformed Iceland into a series of stark, moody and somewhat dreamlike silhouettes. At times the austere rock formations and glowing waterfalls almost appear to be painted. You can see much more of Lee’s work over on his portfolio site. In the words of Lee himself, “Infrared and Iceland, a match made in heaven.” (via PetaPixel)

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A Retired Boeing 727 Converted Into a Home in the Woods

A Retired Boeing 727 Converted Into a Home in the Woods home forests airplanes

photo courtesy airplanehome.com

A Retired Boeing 727 Converted Into a Home in the Woods home forests airplanes

still from the video by Even Quach

A Retired Boeing 727 Converted Into a Home in the Woods home forests airplanes

photos by John Brecher

A Retired Boeing 727 Converted Into a Home in the Woods home forests airplanes

photo by John Brecher

A Retired Boeing 727 Converted Into a Home in the Woods home forests airplanes

photo by John Brecher

A Retired Boeing 727 Converted Into a Home in the Woods home forests airplanes

photo courtesy airplanehome.com

A Retired Boeing 727 Converted Into a Home in the Woods home forests airplanes

still from the video by Even Quach

A Retired Boeing 727 Converted Into a Home in the Woods home forests airplanes

still from the video by Even Quach

A Retired Boeing 727 Converted Into a Home in the Woods home forests airplanes

still from the video by Even Quach

A Retired Boeing 727 Converted Into a Home in the Woods home forests airplanes

photo by John Brecher

A Retired Boeing 727 Converted Into a Home in the Woods home forests airplanes

still from the video by Even Quach

A Retired Boeing 727 Converted Into a Home in the Woods home forests airplanes

photo by John Brecher

When most people board a plane they’re usually leaving home. But not if you’re Bruce Campbell, an innovative engineer who rejected the standards of traditional housing and decided to engage his flight of fancy. He purchased a retired Boeing 727, complete with wings and landing gear, for about $220,000 and situated it in a suburban wooded area outside Portland, Oregon. After many years of work the plane is now a makeshift home with electricity, a shower and kitchen. It’s like a young boy’s dream come true!

Want your own airplane home? “You need to acquire two things: An airliner, and suitable land to host it.” Well, it may not be quite that simple but Campbell has a how-to guide on his webpage to shed light on the process. According to the Aircraft Fleet Recycling Association (AFRA) there will be 500 – 600 aircrafts retired annually over the next two decades. That’s 10,000 – 12,000 potentially new aircraft homes coming on the market. Better start making plans now! (via Bored Panda and Huffington Post)

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Historical Fine Oil Portraits on Crumpled Trash by Kim Alsbrooks

Historical Fine Oil Portraits on Crumpled Trash by Kim Alsbrooks trash portraits painting

Historical Fine Oil Portraits on Crumpled Trash by Kim Alsbrooks trash portraits painting

Historical Fine Oil Portraits on Crumpled Trash by Kim Alsbrooks trash portraits painting

Historical Fine Oil Portraits on Crumpled Trash by Kim Alsbrooks trash portraits painting

Historical Fine Oil Portraits on Crumpled Trash by Kim Alsbrooks trash portraits painting

Historical Fine Oil Portraits on Crumpled Trash by Kim Alsbrooks trash portraits painting

Historical Fine Oil Portraits on Crumpled Trash by Kim Alsbrooks trash portraits painting

Historical Fine Oil Portraits on Crumpled Trash by Kim Alsbrooks trash portraits painting

Philadelphia artist Kim Alsbrooks recreates historial oil portraits on flattened beers cans and fast food containers. Titled “My White Trash Family” the series was conceived while Alsbrook was living in the south and found herself grappling with prevailing ideas of class. She shares via a statement about the project:

The White Trash Series was developed while living in the South out of frustration with some of the prevailing ideologies, in particular, class distinction. This ideology seems to be based on a combination of myth, biased history and a bizarre sentimentality about old wars and social structures. With the juxtaposition of the portraits from museums, once painted on ivory, now on flattened trash like beer cans and fast food containers, the artist sets out to even the playing field, challenging the perception of the social elite in today’s society.

Filmmaker Jesse Brass recently caught up with Alsbrook to interview her for his Making Art series. Watch it above.

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Architectural Columns Constructed from Suspended Charcoal by Seon Ghi Bahk

Architectural Columns Constructed from Suspended Charcoal by Seon Ghi Bahk multiples installation charcoal architecture

Architectural Columns Constructed from Suspended Charcoal by Seon Ghi Bahk multiples installation charcoal architecture

Architectural Columns Constructed from Suspended Charcoal by Seon Ghi Bahk multiples installation charcoal architecture

Architectural Columns Constructed from Suspended Charcoal by Seon Ghi Bahk multiples installation charcoal architecture

Architectural Columns Constructed from Suspended Charcoal by Seon Ghi Bahk multiples installation charcoal architecture

Currently on view at Zadok Gallery in Miami, Fiction of the Fabricated Image is the latest body of work from Seoul-based artist Seon Ghi Bahk. Of particular note is this impressive series of architectural columns constructed from pieces of natural charcoal suspended on nylon threads. The work is part of the artist’s An Aggregation series that explores the complex relationship between nature and humanity, where Bahk suggests “nature” can be incorrectly viewed as simply a backdrop or tool used in the creation of civilization. You can see more over on Zadok Gallery where the installation will be up through August 25, 2014. (via My Amp Goes to 11, My Modern Met)

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Animator Helene Marchal Adds Feathery Flourishes to Video of a Seabird

It’s Friday, so here’s whacky animated short from Helene Marchal who vastly improved this footage of a seabird poking around along the seashore with a few animated flourishes and a quirky soundtrack. On behalf of the internet would like to request many, many more of these.

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Eye Heart Spleen: Human Organs Made from Flowers and Plants by Camila Carlow

Eye Heart Spleen: Human Organs Made from Flowers and Plants by Camila Carlow plants flowers anatomy
Lungs

Eye Heart Spleen: Human Organs Made from Flowers and Plants by Camila Carlow plants flowers anatomy
Intestines

Eye Heart Spleen: Human Organs Made from Flowers and Plants by Camila Carlow plants flowers anatomy
Heart

Eye Heart Spleen: Human Organs Made from Flowers and Plants by Camila Carlow plants flowers anatomy
Eye

Eye Heart Spleen: Human Organs Made from Flowers and Plants by Camila Carlow plants flowers anatomy
Kidneys

This delicate series of sculpted plants is part of a project by artist Camila Carlow titled Eye Heart Spleen. The photographic project is comprised of 13 images representing human organs constructed from plants and flowers. From Carlow’s statement about the project:

The most fascinating and intricate of biological structures, yet we rarely pay heed to the organs inside our body. Regardless of whether we fill ourselves with toxins or nourishing food, whether we exercise or not—our organs sustain us, working away effortlessly and unnoticed.

In a similar way, plants flourishing in the urban environment are a testament to nature’s indifference to our goings on. They grow out of the sides of buildings, in brick walls and between the cracks in concrete, despite of the traffic and pollution.

Camila Carlow is a Guatemalan-born artist based in Bristol, England, and she works in a range of mediums from photography and painting as well as cinematography. Several of the Eye Heart Spleen photos are available as prints in her shop. (via Sweet Station)

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