Colossal Design

Tokyo Lights up at Night in New Glow-In-The-Dark Furoshiki Scarf

January 3, 2018

Laura Staugaitis


Famed for its radiant skyline at night, Tokyo glows on The LINK Collective’s newest addition to their modern furoshiki line. Featuring a special soft touch glow-in-the-dark paint, the design by Hannah Waldron captures the Japanese megalopolis’s towering architecture in a contemporary, slightly abstracted design. Mount Fuji and a star-spangled sky watch over the city on a background of cerulean blue, accented with red and white. Throughout the day, the glow-in-the-dark paint absorbs ambient light, and at night the city’s windows light up.

Furoshiki, the classic Japanese square textile, are meant to be used for a variety of purposes from wrapping packages to picnic blankets and of course, as a scarf. The LINK Collective works with Japanese craftsmen and artists from around the world for their line of hand-made furoshiki. Tokyo and other designs are available in The Colossal Shop.

 

 



Art Photography

Colorful Portraits of Adoptable Dogs Photographed by Paul Octavious

January 3, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Photographer Paul Octavious (previously) casts new light on Chicago’s adoptable dogs through a collaboration with PAWS, the city’s largest no-kill animal shelter. Octavious, an editorial and commercial photographer, explained to Colossal that he was on a shoot for NBC when he thought to pair the vibrant HUE lighting setup with rescue pups that were set to be photographed with characters from a NBC TV show. Octavious ended up spotlighting the animals themselves with the HUE lighting, resulting in these colorful portraits, and he has continued to volunteer his time helping to get Chicago’s homeless pets adopted with his ResHue Dog series. You can follow Paul on Instagram and learn more about available pets at PAWS.

 

 



Art

Explosive Light-Based Installations by Adela Andea

January 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Romanian-born artist Adela Andea creates futuristic light installations that range from wall-based works to immersive environments. The pieces appears as lit explosions, with LED lights, magnifying lenses, and flex neon springing outwards in a blend of chaos and control. Despite their composition of electrified material, each work is inspired by a natural phenomena. Andea looks to bioluminescent sea life, melting icebergs, and cosmological events to shape the composition and meaning of her large-scale installations.

Andea is currently represented by Anya Tish Gallery in Houston and Cris Worley Fine Arts in Dallas. You can see more of her neon-based installations on her website. (via The Jealous Curator)

 

 



Photography

New Photographs of Waves Crashing Against the Setting Sun by Warren Keelan

January 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Australian photographer Warren Keelan (previously here and here) completely immerses himself in his subject matter, wading alongside gigantic waves to capture the perfect break. Keelan is fascinated by the unpredictable nature of ocean swells, in addition to how the changing sunlight dictates the way each movement is captured.

Keelan manages to develop a story with the moments he photographs by carefully following how waves interact with natural elements such as the setting sun or a chance rainbow on the horizon. The New South Wales-based photographer has compiled 12 of his most captivating recent photographs into a 2018 calendar available on his website. You can see more of his work on his Instagram and Facebook.

 

 



History Photography

A Norwegian University Student Used a Spy Camera in This Amazing Example of 19th Century Street Photography

January 2, 2018

Christopher Jobson

All images courtesy the Norwegian Folk Museum.

Fredrik Carl Mülertz Størmer is known mostly as an accomplished mathematician and physicist from Norway, but as a side hobby he was also an amateur photographer, taking to the streets of Oslo with a bulky camera secreted in his clothing to capture candid moments of unsuspecting passersby. Most of his photos were taken in the 1890s while Størmer was a 19-year-old student at the Royal Frederick University using a Stirn Concealed Vest Spy Camera, a secretive camera with a narrow lens designed to poke through a vest pocket’s buttonhole.

Størmer’s photography stands in stark contrast to portraiture of the era that consisted mainly of staid and unsmiling images against decorative backdrops. Here we see a rare view of people going about their daily lives nearly 125 years ago, often smiling and perhaps caught off guard from the young student angling for the shot. To see more of Størmer’s work head over to Norwegian Folkmuseum. (via Bored Panda)

 

 



Art

Life-Size Cardboard Sculptures of Chinese Villagers Tap Into Artist Warren King’s Ancestral Heritage

December 31, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Warren King began sculpting with cardboard as an attempt to add fantasy to the lives of his children, creatively crafting masks and helmets out of the recyclable material. This slowly evolved into a more time-consuming arts practice as King began focusing less time on costumes, and more time making large sculptures of his own. After a visit to his grandparents’ village in Shaoxing, China, the New York City-based artist felt compelled to more deeply connect with his cultural past. This sparked Grandfather’s Friend, and Arrival Times, a series of life-size cardboard recreations of his ancestors. 

“During my first visit to China about 7 years ago, I visited the village and spoke with residents who actually remembered my grandparents from over 50 years ago,” said King. “It was a pivotal experience for me, one that inspired me to become an artist. Through my work, I am attempting to understand the fragile connections to people and culture, and examine whether those connections, once broken, can be restored.”

King’s cardboard sculptures will be shown in the exhibition Art of Asia at the Peninsula Fine Arts Center from February 2 to March 28, 2018. You can see more of his work on his Instagram and Flickr.

 

 



Art Design

Nature-Based Textiles by Vanessa Barragão Highlight Ecosystems Above and Below the Sea

December 29, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Portuguese textile artist Vanessa Barragão produces carpets and tapestries from a variety of different techniques, creating multi-faceted landscapes with the use of latch hooking, crochet, weaving, basketry, and felt. Her environmental works present imitation coral, fungi, and algae as three-dimensional elements in plush contexts such as the circular work viewed above which she calls Earth Rug. The piece was developed for this year’s Milan Design Week and spans nearly 15 feet in diameter.

You can shop Barragão’s smaller coral-decorated textiles on her Etsy Shop, and view more of her larger works on her Instagram and Behance. (via Lustik)