Lifelike Galvanized Wire Animal Sculptures by Kendra Haste

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Working only with layers of painted galvanized wire atop steel armature, UK artist Kendra Haste creates faithful reproductions of creatures large and small for both public installations and private collections around the world. A graduate of the from the Royal College of Art, Haste says she is fascinated by how such a seemingly ordinary medium, chicken wire, is capable of suggesting “the sense of movement and life, of contour and volume, the contrasts of weight and lightness, of solidity and transparency—values that I find in my natural subjects.” She continues about her work with animals:

What interests me most about studying animals is identifying the spirit and character of the individual creatures. I try to create a sense of the living, breathing subject in a static 3D form, attempting to convey the emotional essence without indulging in the sentimental or anthropomorphic.

In 2010, Historic Royal Palaces commissioned Haste to fabricate thirteen sculptures around the Tower of London that will remain on view through 2021. You can see much more in this online gallery, and as part of the Art and the Animal exhibition currently at the Ella Carothers Dunnegan Gallery of Art in Missouri. (thnx, Kat Powers!)

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Handmade Candy: Watch as Giant Blobs of Melted Sugar are Embedded with Tiny Designs

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This video from La Confiserie CandyLabs in Montreal demonstrates the labor-intensive process of rolling traditional hard candy. Each design starts with colored and flavored strips of heated sugar which are precisely rolled together into an increasingly large log-like shape. Despite reaching a final diameter of nearly 6″, the form is then stretched impossibly thin to create hundreds of pieces of tiny hard candies. From start to finish the entire process takes about three hours, during which the candy (and candy maker) never stop moving for more than a few seconds. You can see more of their candy designs over on Facebook. (via Neatorama)

Painted Pedestrian Views of Dark, Urban Scenes by Cristóbal Pérez García

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Iron Raining. Oil on canvas. 89 x 146 cm

Iron Raining. Oil on canvas. 89 x 146 cm

Lights at the Bus Stop. Oil on canvas. 120 x 120 cm

Lights at the Bus Stop. Oil on canvas. 120 x 120 cm

5ª Avenida.195 x 195 cm

5ª Avenida.195 x 195 cm

Empire State. 146 x 146 cm

Empire State. 146 x 146 cm

Afternoon From High Line Park. Oil on canvas. 120 x 120 cm.

Afternoon From High Line Park. Oil on canvas. 120 x 120 cm.

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Cristóbal Pérez García’s oil painted scenes are those found in twilight or dusk, landscapes encased in smog and the highly trafficked realities of living in an urban metropolis. The vantage points are those of the pedestrian, Garcia’s own view when embarking on a new city to paint. He recently shared a video, Traffic, that gives a short, but intimate glimpse into his process both within the studio and on the street.

Garcia’s highly textured paintings give a nice balance to the blurred masses of city inhabitants and his detailed buses, cabs, and cars. Each painting also has an emphasis on light, either natural or the reflection of vehicle and traffic lights in the crowded streets.

Garcia was born in 1976 in Álora, Málaga and studied painting and sculpture at the Universidad de Granada, Spain. Garcia has upcoming exhibitions at Galería Mar from March 5-18, and Art Expo New York from April 23-26. You can see more of Garcia’s urban landscapes on his website and frequently posted on Twitter. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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Seagull Skytrails: An Echo Time-Lapse Reveals the Flight Path of Birds over Cornwall

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Videographer Paul Parker used the ‘echo’ effect in video editing software After Effects to show the flight paths of birds near his home in Cornwall, UK. Parker also filmed birds flying past his window for an hour and compressed it into just a few seconds to show what it would look like if they all flew by at once. Artist Dennis Hlynsky uses the same effect any many of his own bird and insect videos seen here previously. (via Kottke)

Graffiti Artist ‘Faust’ Draws Calligraphic Messages on Snow-Covered Cars in New York City

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For the last few years NYC-based graffiti artist Faust has been putting everyone’s handwriting to shame with these impromptu notes drawn on snow-covered vehicles around the city. Faust is known worldwide for his fusion of classical calligraphy with contemporary graffiti in murals and other art projects. You can follow him on Instagram and see several more snow pieces spanning the last few years on Behance. (via Laughing Squid, Design TAXI)

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Unconditional Rebel: A 3.5-Minute Music Video Shot in Just 5 Seconds with a High Speed Camera

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One day in mid-Autumn of last year, 80 extras lined up along a dirt road in an industrial area in France. A car drove by at 50 km/h (about 31 mph) and filmed them engaging in various activities – everything from lighting up a barbecue grill and cutting a metal shopping cart to playing the cymbals and talking on the phone. The action was over, quite literally, in 5 seconds. French filmmaker Guillaume Panariello describes it as “the shortest shooting ever.” But it’s when the footage is slowed down that the magic happens.

The footage was filmed at an incredibly high rate of 1000 frames/second. Once it’s put to slow motion, what happened in 5 seconds unfolds into a 3.5-minute “dreamlike mural.” There were some digital elements later added in the editing room but for the most part this is a single, 5-second shot. It was put to the song “Unconditional Rebel” by French musician Siska. (via PetaPixel)

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Extremes of Human Nature Explored through Hand-Built Stoneware Animals by Beth Cavener Stichter

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Obariyon. 2013. Stoneware, antique hooks, glaze. 17 x 46 x 30″

Washington-based artist Beth Cavener Stichter sculpts human-sized animals from clay and other materials in both dramatically overt and subtly ambiguous displays of emotion. Hung from ropes or pinned to walls, the anthropomorphic sculptures are infused with juxtapositions that depict the extremes of both human emotion and animalistic behavior: predator and prey, love and hate, fear and peace. “On the surface,” shares Stichter, “these figures are simply feral animals suspended in a moment of tension. Beneath the surface, they embody the consequences of human fear, apathy, aggression, and misunderstanding.”

Stichter collaborates with a variety of artists in her work, including Alessandro Gallo, who designed and painted the ornate Japanese tattoos on the nineteen-foot long anaconda snake depicted in Tangled Up in You seen below. There’s much more to see over on her website and several studio views on Hi-Fructose. All images courtesy the artist.

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Obariyon, detail.

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Obariyon, detail.

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Tangled Up in You. 2014. Stoneware, mixed media. Tattoos designed and painted by Alessandro Gallo.

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Tangled Up in You, detail.

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Tangled Up in You, detail.

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Tangled Up in You, detail.

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The Sentimental Question. 2012. Stoneware.

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L’Amante. 2012. Stoneware, painted tattoos. 45 x 60 x 44″

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L’Amante, detail.

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The Question That Devours. 2012. Stoneware.

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