New Hydrostone Sculptures by Daniel Arsham Isolate Human Gestures 

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“Pyrite Hands in Prayer” 2015 (All images courtesy Galerie Perrotin)

We’re no stranger to Daniel Arsham‘s figural sculptures (previously here and here), works that use basic materials like broken glass or hydrostone to produce life-size human figures and technological objects like boom boxes, cameras, and video game controllers.

In his newer works Arsham focuses more intently on the human figure, creating full bodies and discrete gestures like hands folded in prayer, clasped together, or clutching a basketball. In each, the sculpture is seen in various states of decay, chunks missing from the work like it has been eaten away by some menacing force. Erosion is most apparent within the full body sculptures as entire knees, legs, and torsos are removed from the form. Like earlier work these sculptures keep a neutral palette—the pyrite, hydrostone, selenite, and obsidian used in their construction giving each a matte gray in order to focus on their crumbling form.

The New York-based artist is one half of Snarkitecture, a collaborative that is known for straddling the line between art and architecture. Arsham’s work has been exhibited at PS1 in New York, The Museum of Contemporary Art in Miami, The New Museum in New York, and Carré d’Art de Nîmes in France among others. Arsham is represented by Galerie Emmanuel Perrotin in Paris, Hong Kong and New York, OHWOW in Los Angeles, Baro Galeria in Sao Paulo and Pippy Houldsworth in London. (via Exasperated Viewer on Air)

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“Pyrite Hands in Prayer” 2015

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“Pyrite Hands in Prayer” 2015

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From the exhibition “Fictional Archeology” at Galerie Perrotin Hong Kong , 2015

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“The Dying Gaul Revisited” 2015

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“The Dying Gaul Revisited” 2015

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From the exhibition “Fictional Archeology” at Galerie Perrotin Hong Kong , 2015

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From the exhibition “Fictional Archeology” at Galerie Perrotin Hong Kong , 2015

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A Giant Pair of Pneumatic Articulating Feather Wings 

For Halloween this year, Alexis Noriega of the Crooked Feather designed and built this wickedly amazing pair of pneumatic articulating wings that spring to action at the press of a button. What a great design, the sound of air pressure really adds to it. Noriega says she’ll soon have a tutorial online so you can build your own. (via Laughing Squid)

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Optical Float Paintings Suspended in Layers of Glass by Wilfried Grootens 

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Artist Wilfried Grootens paints extraordinary figures comprised of dots and tendrils sandwiched between dozens of laminate glass layers. These strangely precise optical float paintings take on the form of some fantastic microscopic creatures and are sometimes reminiscent of the photos depicting the milliseconds before a nuclear explosion. The design of each cube is so precise, the thin layers of paint appear to completely vanish when viewed from a side angle.

At the age of 15 Grootens first apprenticed as a glass painter at the Derix Company in Germany where he learned to restore antique stained glass windows. Four years later he left on a near decade-long adventure to travel the world, play music, and experience the cultures of Asia and South America before eventually returning to his work with glass. In 1988, he received a Master Craftsman’s Diploma in Munich and by the following year had opened his own studio in Kleve.

Grootens will have work at the upcoming SOFA Expo Chicago through Habatat Galleries starting November 5th. (via ARTchung, Baby)

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Where the Shark Bubbles Blow, 2012; 9.5 x 8.25 x 8.25 inches; optical float glass. Painted, laminated, polished.

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Where the Shark Bubbles Blow 2015 PL 1 / Where the Shark Bubbles Blow E2 2015

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Where the Shark Bubbles Blow III, 2013; 9.25 x 8.5 x 8.25 inches; optical float glass. Painted, laminated, polished.

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Polymer Flower Sculptures and Tiles by Angela Schwer 

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Working from a tiny table in the nook of her living room, California-based artist Angela Schwer crafts explosive dahlias, gardenias, poppies, fungi, and sea creatures all from a custom blend of polymer clays. Meant primarily as decorative objects, the dense handmade pieces are surprisingly detailed, assembled from hundreds of perfectly formed clay pieces and formed into large tiles that can be hung from a wall or set on a table. You can see more in her online shop, Dilly Pad.

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Landscapes Painted on the Surfaces of Cut Logs by Alison Moritsugu 

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When European settlers arrived throughout the 18th and 19th centuries and rapidly expanded their territory across North America, the prevalent belief was that of Manifest Destiny. Specifically, that American settlers were destined to expand throughout the continent by any means necessary regardless of cost, environmental impact, or the devastating harm to Native American populations. The artwork of the period, primarily sweeping landscapes influenced by the European pastoral tradition, did well to capture the pristine beauty of the previously undocumented continent, but completely glossed over the reality of what was really happening.

In her log paintings, artist Alison Moritsugu faces that strange juxtaposition head-on by choosing a literal meataphor—the remains of downed trees—as a canvas for her bucolic oil paintings of the countryside where that very tree may have once originated. A fantastic collision of art history and environmental awareness. The rough edges of the cut branches and trunks appear like windows into the past, telling a story that the tree’s rings alone cannot. She shares via her artist statement:

Painters throughout art history from the Northern Song, Baroque, Rococo and Hudson River School tailored their depictions of nature to serve an artistic narrative. Today, photoshopped images of verdant forests and unspoiled beaches invite us to vacation and sightsee, providing a false sense of assurance that the wilderness will always exist. By exploring idealized views of nature, my work acknowledges our more complex and precarious relationship with the environment.

It should be noted that Moritsugu uses salvaged log segments from naturally fallen trees, or trees that would otherwise be turned into mulch. You can see a collection of new work starting November 12th at Littlejohn Contemporary in New York. (via My Modern Met)

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The ‘Birdman’ of Chennai Feeds Up to 4,000 Wild Green Parakeets Daily from His Home 

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Licensed from Barcroft Media

Ten years ago, after a tsunami struck near Chennai, India, a camera repairman named Sekar noticed a pair of displaced green parakeets perched near his back porch. He immediately started to feed them with rice from his home, and the birds soon nested nearby and slowly—and then not so slowly—began to multiply.

The 62-year-old now cares for an estimated 4,000 birds that live near his home, spending almost 40% of his income on their care. He rises around 4am to start cooking giant pots of rice which he services twice daily on a latticework of boards on the roof of his home. This video from Aravind Kumar takes us into Sekar’s home to see what taking care of several thousand exotic birds looks like.

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Licensed from Barcroft Media

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Licensed from Barcroft Media

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Licensed from Barcroft Media

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Lush Paintings of Solitary Swimmers by Pedro Covo 

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Here’s a lovely series of swimming figures painted by Colombian illustrator and painter Pedro Covo. Covo splendidly captures the obscuring nature of water as splashes are rendered in frenetic splatters of paint, and the sinuous lines of bodies seem to evaporate into brush strokes. The artist most recently exhibited at Río Laboratorio, and has also worked as an illustrator for the Walt Disney company. You can see a bit more over on Instagram and at the Colagene Creative Clinic. (via The Daily Blip, Empty Kingdom)

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