Discarded Fishing Nets and Other Ocean Trash Repurposed Into Running Shoes 

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Image via Adidas

Stitched with thread produced from discarded fishing nets, Adidas‘ newest shoes are a collaboration with the ocean activist collective and company Parley for the Oceans. The idea for the shoe was hatched last year, but was more of a idealistic prototype than a ready-to-wear option for the masses. Today however, Adidas is releasing fifty pairs of the sneaker, a shoe composed of more than 16 old plastic bottles and 13 grams of gill nets.

This limited number of pairs is due to the difficult task of taking the collected trash and spinning it into fiber suitable for high performance shoes. Plastic bottles are relatively easy to transform into a useable material, but when it comes to the gill nets (which emit the smell of rotting fish) the task is a bit more difficult. Not only is the smell difficult to scrub from the nets, but the nylon is extra tough and requires being ground into a powder before it can be reformed into a material fit for the Adidas sneaker.

To collect these environmentally damaging materials, Parley partners with small countries that have large ties to marine pollution—locations like the Maldives, Grenada, and Jamaica. After partnering, Parley team members help clean up fisheries and other oceanside spots while teaching locals alternatives to using plastic in their businesses. The materials collected by Parley are then distributed not only to Adidas, but also institutions such as Parsons School of Design, which might help change the way new generations of designers think about incorporating these materials into future designs.

An announcement will be made soon on how to win one of the 50 released pairs of the collaborative shoe on Adidas’ Instagram.

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Image via Adidas

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Image via Adidas

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photo credit: Giacomo Giorigi / Sea Shepherd Global

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New Giant Paper Flower Sculptures by Tiffanie Turner 

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All images provided by Tiffanie Turner

Tiffanie Turner (previously) individually cuts thousands of segments of paper to piece together her often 5-foot-wide flower compositions, works that can take up to 400 hours to complete by hand. Turner’s artwork aims to explore nature’s bloom and decay, and during a recent residency at the de Young Museum in San Francisco she enlisted over 4,000 visitors to collectively compose and then destroy a Ranunculus sculpture while stationed at the museum during the month of May.

Many of the works she created while in residence will head to the Tower Hill Botanic Garden in Boylston, Massachusetts for an exhibition opening August 9th and running through September 18th, 2016. You can see more of Turner’s work on her blog and Instagram.

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Dramatic Portraits of Pet Fish Swimming with Personality 

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Ah yes, the majestic… goldfish. Photographer Visarute Angkatavanich (previously here and here) takes us up close and personal with these unusual domestic fish, from Siamese fighting fish (betta) to various breeds of goldfish, the Bangkok-based photographer casts these unusual pets in a spectacular light. Shooting in crystal clear aquariums with powerful lenses, Angkatavanich photographs each fish against black and white backgrounds creating the effect of each fish swimming in midair. The close-up portraits also have the added benefit of capturing moments of unintended personality. You can explore more of his recent photos on 500px.

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Impermanent Anatomical Drawings on Chalkboards by Chuan-Bin Chung 

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Chinese illustrator and anatomy instructor Chuan-Bin Chung encourages his students to understand the intricacies of the human body by drawing them. For many of his lessons he creates impermanent drawings on chalkboards as a helpful guide, but instead of quick sketches as one might be accustomed to, the pieces are exacting and colorful depictions of bones, muscles, and tendons—practically works of art in their own right. Chung shares many videos and sketches of his lessons on Facebook. (via Bored Panda)

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New Magnetized Planters Allow Your Garden to Levitate in the Air 

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For over a year, Swedish scientist Simon Morris has been experimenting with levitating plants, growing common flora while suspended in the air. This system, called LYFE, consists of a planter that hovers just over an oak base powered by strong magnetism. Through this invisible force field house plants are able to hover while also turning slowly to give equal sunlight to each of their sides.

Every LYFE planter is designed as a geodesic form, paired minimally with its discrete base to draw attention to the action of the vessel rather than the piece itself. You can read more about LYFE on their Kickstarter and see Morris’s other floating home accessory, FLYTE, on their website. (via Design Milk)

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Digital Sculptures of Female Forms Rendered in Flowers by Jean-Michel Bihorel 

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All images via Jean-Michel Bihorel

French 3D artist Jean-Michel Bihorel has been rendering films for the past 6 years, while also keeping up with personal projects that utilize the same professional tools. In his latest works, he has produced two digital sculptures of the female form composed of a sample of dry flowers. In the first work the body is completely shaped from the floral sample, the woman shown in different poses that demonstrate her whole form. The second rendered figure is focused on just the torso, and has a cracking marble skin that reveals flowers inside. You can see more of Biohrel’s digital sculptures on his Behance.

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