Art Photography

Sinister Architecture Constructed from Archival Library of Congress Images by Jim Kazanjian

January 19, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Inspired in part by the classic horror literature of H.P. Lovecraft, artist Jim Kazanjian (previously) assembles foreboding buildings using snippets of photographs found in the Library of Congress archives. Equal parts secret lair, insane asylum, and the work of a deranged architect, Kazanjian’s collages are created from 50-70 separate photographs taken over the last century. Each piece takes nearly three months to complete as he painstakingly searches for just the right elements, a process he likens to “solving a puzzle, except in reverse.” From his artist statement:

I’ve chosen photography as a medium because of the cultural misunderstanding that it has a sort of built-in objectivity. This allows me to set up a visual tension within the work, to make it resonate and lure the viewer further inside. My current series is inspired by the classic horror literature of H.P. Lovecraft, Algernon Blackwood and similar authors. I am intrigued with the narrative archetypes these writers utilize to transform the commonplace into something sinister and foreboding. In my work, I prefer to use these devices as a means to generate entry points for the viewer. I’m interested in occupying a space where the mundane intersects the strange, and the familiar becomes alien. In a sense, I am attempting to render the sublime.

You can see much more of Kazanjian’s work on his website, and at Jennifer Kostuik Gallery in Vancouver later this year. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



History Photography

The Rescued Film Project Discovers 31 Rolls of Undeveloped Film Shot by an Unknown WW2 Soldier

January 18, 2015

Christopher Jobson

Founded by photographer Levi Bettwieser, the Rescued Film Project obtains unclaimed film rolls from the 1930s to the 1990s and develops them for the first time, salvaging hidden memories than might have otherwise been completely lost to time. In late 2014 at an auction in Ohio, Bettwieser discovered a lot of 31 undeveloped film rolls dating back to WWII with labels including Boston Harbor, La Havre Harbor, and Lucky Strike Camp. After acquiring the rolls of film, he set to work and developed dozens of usable negatives that somehow survived the last 70 years. The process was captured in this 10-minute film by Tucker Debevec.

Bettwieser says that although many of the rolls were too damaged to develop, the majority of them resulted in usable prints, and he still has one larger format roll to develop that requires special supplies. Staring carefully at so many photos may have also resulted in an additional discovery. Bettwieser noticed a single unidentified soldier seems to appear in several different shots, and he suspects this may be the photographer who lent the camera to others in order to get shots of himself. You can scroll through dozens more photos over on the project’s website.

Part of the Rescued Film Project’s mission is to connect photos with relevant places and people, so if you recognize anything, or if you have rolls of old undeveloped film, be sure to get in touch. (via PetaPixel)

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Design

Your Face in a Vase: Custom 3D-Printed Vessels Containing Multiple Profiles

January 16, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Currently funding on Kickstarter, Fahz is a concept for a 3d-printed vase that contains multiple profiles of friends or family members embedded at different intervals around the surface of the vessel. The designers have plans to create vases containing up to 16 profiles, though I can’t quite imagine what that would look like. If you want your face in a vase, head over here. They hope to ship by Mother’s Day.

 

 



Photography

Enchanting European Landscapes Inspired by Brothers Grimm Folk Tales Photographed by Kilian Schönberger

January 15, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Brothers Grimm’s Wanderings is the second in a series of European landscape photographs by Kilian Schönberger (previously) intended to reflect the feeling of Brothers Grimm folk tales. Schönberger travels to locations around central Europe and imagines what the real-life backdrop of stories like Rapunzel, Hansel and Gretel, or Snow White would look like. To see the first part of the series check out Brothers Grimm’s Homeland.

 

 



Photography

A Rare Flipped Iceberg in Antarctica Photographed by Alex Cornell

January 15, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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While on an expedition to Antarctica last month, photographer Alex Cornell witnessed a massive iceberg flip, revealing a strangely translucent blue underside that’s completely free of snow and debris. According to Science World, almost 90% of any given iceberg is below the surface, making iceberg flips extremely rare. Much larger iceberg flips are even capable of causing tsunamis that can overtake nearby ships. You can see more photos from Cornells trip on his website. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Animation Art Design

Fascinating 3D-Printed Fibonacci Zoetrope Sculptures

January 14, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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These 3d-printed zoetrope sculptures were designed by John Edmark, and they only animate when filmed under a strobe light or with the help of a camera with an extremely short shutter speed. He shares about the project:

These are 3-D printed sculptures designed to animate when spun under a strobe light. The placement of the appendages is determined by the same method nature uses in pinecones and sunflowers. The rotation speed is synchronized to the strobe so that one flash occurs every time the sculpture turns 137.5º—the golden angle. If you count the number of spirals on any of these sculptures you will find that they are always Fibonacci numbers.

For this video, rather than using a strobe, the camera was set to a very short shutter speed (1/4000 sec) in order to freeze the spinning sculpture.

If you happen to have a 3D printer handy, you can find instructions on how to make these over on Instructables. (via Stellar)

 

 



Illustration

Illustrator Christoph Niemann’s Quirky Visual Experiments Shared on Instagram Every Sunday

January 14, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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New York-based artist and illustrator Christoph Niemann sees the world a little differently. You might recognize his covers for the The New Yorker, Atlantic Monthly, The New York Times Magazine, or perhaps one of his Google Doodles or even his I LEGO N.Y. project. As part of his creative practice Niemann sets time aside every Sunday to experiment with different visual concepts, much of which he shares on his Instagram account. Collected here are some of our favorites, but you can see much more over on his Tumblr. Niemann also has a solo show at MAK in Vienna opening later this summer.