Art

Towering New Mixed Media Portraits by Andrew Salgado

July 10, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

'Sunset (Good Morning Beautiful, I Waited All Night Long)' Oil, oil pastel, spray, and hand-dyed and hand stitched linen on Canvas, 245 x 215 cm

‘Sunset (Good Morning Beautiful, I Waited All Night Long)’ Oil, oil pastel, spray, and hand-dyed and hand stitched linen on Canvas, 245 x 215 cm

Canadian-born artist Andrew Salgado (previously here and here) presents a new body of work composed of towering portraits that span over eight-feet-tall. The mixed media works incorporate materials as diverse as paperback books and miniature cacti—objects that bring even more texture to the cross-hatched oil and pastel faces portrayed on each canvas. The works are included in his solo exhibition A Room With a View of the Ocean which runs through August 20 at Lauba House in Zagreb, Croatia. You can see more of Salgado’s mixed media works on his Facebook and Instagram.

(Detail) 'Soft Cage' Oil, oil pastel, paperback novels, and found objects on Canvas, 225 x 205 cm

(Detail) ‘Soft Cage’ Oil, oil pastel, paperback novels, and found objects on Canvas, 225 x 205 cm

'Soft Cage' Oil, oil pastel, paperback novels, and found objects on Canvas, 225 x 205 cm

‘Soft Cage’ Oil, oil pastel, paperback novels, and found objects on Canvas, 225 x 205 cm

'Ocean (Pretty Boys with Tears Like Grapes)' Oil, oil pastel, spray, collage, mixed-media and hand-dyed and hand stitched linen and paperback copies of The Outsider, A Season in Hell, and Tropic of Cancer on Canvas, 245 x 245 cm

‘Ocean (Pretty Boys with Tears Like Grapes)’ Oil, oil pastel, spray, collage, mixed-media and hand-dyed and hand stitched linen and paperback copies of The Outsider, A Season in Hell, and Tropic of Cancer on Canvas, 245 x 245 cm

'Seven Suns' Oil, oil pastel, spray, and hand-dyed and hand stitched linen, cacti, and paperback copy of The Outsider on Canvas, 245 x 215 cm

‘Seven Suns’ Oil, oil pastel, spray, and hand-dyed and hand stitched linen, cacti, and paperback copy of The Outsider on Canvas, 245 x 215 cm

(Detail) 'Seven Suns' Oil, oil pastel, spray, and hand-dyed and hand stitched linen, cacti, and paperback copy of The Outsider on Canvas, 245 x 215 cm

(Detail) ‘Seven Suns’ Oil, oil pastel, spray, and hand-dyed and hand stitched linen, cacti, and paperback copy of The Outsider on Canvas, 245 x 215 cm

'Morning (Bacchus in Chains)' Oil, oil pastel, collage, ceramic items, thread, wood, mixed media collage, Virgin Mary statues, found book, found objects, postcard, and ocean noises on paper and wallpaper, 106 x 106cm

‘Morning (Bacchus in Chains)’ Oil, oil pastel, collage, ceramic items, thread, wood, mixed media collage, Virgin Mary statues, found book, found objects, postcard, and ocean noises on paper and wallpaper, 106 x 106 cm

'Forever (Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow)' Oil, oil pastel, spray, collage, mixed-media and hand-dyed and hand stitched linen and paperback copy of Slaughterhouse V on Canvas, 245 x 235 cm

‘Forever (Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow)’ Oil, oil pastel, spray, collage, mixed-media and hand-dyed and hand stitched linen and paperback copy of Slaughterhouse V on Canvas, 245 x 235 cm

"A LESSON IN PATIENCE WE ARE THROW HEAD FIRST INTO HELL I CRY HIS FIGERS THRU A SMALL HOLE IN A BRICK WALL BRINGS ME BACK BUT I LEARNED ABOUT HIM ME THE DEPTHS OF MY SOUL AND MY STRENGTH IN THIS UNCATEGORIC JOURNEY A LONG WALK TOWARDS HELL” Oil, oil pastel, collage, plastic skulls, wood, collage, found collages and evil glances on paper and screenprint, 106 x 106 cm

“A LESSON IN PATIENCE WE ARE THROW HEAD FIRST INTO HELL I CRY HIS FIGERS THRU A SMALL HOLE IN A BRICK WALL BRINGS ME BACK BUT I LEARNED ABOUT HIM ME THE DEPTHS OF MY SOUL AND MY STRENGTH IN THIS UNCATEGORIC JOURNEY A LONG WALK TOWARDS HELL” Oil, oil pastel, collage, plastic skulls, wood, collage, found collages and evil glances on paper and screenprint, 106 x 106 cm

Install shot of 'A Room with a View of the Ocean'

Install shot of ‘A Room with a View of the Ocean’

 

 



Illustration

New Pen & Ink Depictions of Trees Sprouting into Animals by Alfred Basha

July 10, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Italian illustrator Alfred Basha (previously) continues his ongoing project of fusing animal forms with the branches of trees. The popular illustrations have recently been turned into both shirts and prints and you can see more of his recent work on Instagram.

 

 



Design

An Owl-Shaped Cabin Invites You to Sleep off the Grid in Bordeaux, France

July 7, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

A cluster of three hollow wooden owls peer out from the end of a dock in Bordeaux, France, connected from within to form a two-story cabin. The Watchers was designed and built by Zebra3, a local contemporary art production company. The design was inspired by the small owls that nest on the ground in the surrounding marsh, with shingles to match their feathery heads.

“The idea of ​​birds came to me very quickly,” said Candice Petrillo, Zebra3’s key designer on the project. “After the last extension of the commercial zone, I saw migrants swirling around in the sky, looking for the old dried wetland. The nod of animal eye and the curve of the object are a tribute to the sculptors François Pompon and François-Xavier Lalanne.”

The structure is a part of a series of unique buildings scattered throughout the region, cabins that invite guests to spend the night for free in order to encourage hiking and exploration. The project, Les Refuges Périurbains is a collaboration between Zebra3 and Bruit du Frigo. You can see more of the area’s cabins on Les Refuges Périurbains’ website, including this lakeside home shaped like a cloud. (via Inhabitant)

 

 



Art

Twin Skulls Transform the Facade of this 19th Century French Castle

July 7, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Okuda San Miguel’s (previously) recently transformed 19th-century castle in Château, France is perhaps my favorite work by the artist to date. The intervention, titled Skull in the Mirror, covers the gigantic home’s facade in a mix of colorful polka dots, and is flanked on either side by two three-story skulls. Three dormer windows at the top of the castle are lined in bright red, blue, and orange, while the second story windows serve as openings for the prismatic skull’s four combined eyes.

After stints as a school and holiday center for children, the castle was abandoned for nearly 30 years.

Five years ago it was acquired by the local Town Hall. Recently it became a site for Urban Art Paris' LaBel Valette Festival, which hosted Okuda the last weekend in June. You can see a short video of the project, created by @chopemdownfilms, below.

A post shared by OKUDA SAN MIGUEL (@okudart) on

 

 



Colossal

New in the Colossal Shop: Furoshiki Scarves Hand-Made in Japan by the LINK Collective

July 6, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Kyoko Bowskill, the founder of Tokyo-based LINK, is working to revive the centuries-old Japanese tradition of carrying objects of all sorts in beautiful reusable squares of fabric: furoshiki. Made from smooth and lightweight cotton fabric and measuring 90cm square (about 35 inches), these furoshiki can be twisted into wine bottle carriers, folded for gift-wrapping, knotted into a quick tote bag, spread out for a picnic, or simply tossed around your shoulders as a scarf.

From the initial design to the finishing touches, each scarf is hand-made. LINK collaborates with designers around the world to create new imagery for their scarves, adding a modern spin to the age-old concept. The small factory where each scarf is made has decades of experience that they use to pull each screen print; carefully air dry the scarves, and hand-roll and sew each seam for a polished finish.

We’ve selected some of our favorite designs for The Colossal Shop: clever origami-inspired trompe l’oeils of dots and paper, a journey tracing the dizzying path of the mountain-weaving Hida Express train, a dreamy scene of cherry blossoms in moonlight, and a contemporary take on the classic look of ruffles.

 

 



Art

Artist Ronit Baranga’s Disturbing Anatomical Dishware Creeps Across Tabletops

July 6, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Artist Ronit Baranga (previously) creates ceramic sculptural works she describes as existing on the “border between living and still life”—objects guaranteed to either tickle your funny bone or haunt your worst nightmares, depending on your perspective. Baranga depicts dishware as sprouting human fingers and gaping mouths as the objects traipse across tabletops or physically cling to one another in a permanent embrace. The pieces are both silly and sinister as they come to life as if from a cartoon. A quick scroll through her Instagram reveals even darker works that give us the bonafide heebie-jeebies.

Ronit most recently had work on view at the Gross Anatomies show at the Akron Art Museum, and is also a contruting artist to the Small Works 2017 with beinArt Gallery through August. (via My Amp Goes to 11)

A post shared by Ronit Baranga (@ronitbaranga) on

 

 



Art Crafts

Flora and Fauna Paper Constructions by Ann Wood and Dean Lucker

July 6, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Artist duo Ann Wood and Dean Lucker (aka Woodlucker) forged a partnership in 1987 shortly after graduating from Minneapolis College of Art and Design. Together they pursue a variety of both collaborative and personal projects from Lucker’s kinetic sculptures to Wood’s illustrated papercraft. Wood refers to her process as “drawing with scissors,” and merges aspects of both paper cutting and traditional illustration with ink. After forming the moths, butterflies, feathers, and flowers, the pieces are then carefully arranged within collection boxes designed by Dean. You can follow more of their work on Instagram and on their portfolio site. (thnx, Diana!)