Art

Geometric Laser-Cut Wood Relief Sculptures by Gabriel Schama

April 1, 2015

Christopher Jobson

mandala-1

Working with precisely cut 1/8″ pieces of laser-cut mahogany plywood, Oakland-based artist Gabriel Schama creates densely layered wood relief sculptures that twist, intersect, and overlap to create various mandala-like forms. Each piece begins as a vector illustration which is fed into his laser cutter (which he named Elsie), and is then glued and finished by hand. Collected here are a number of recent sculptures produced after a successful Kickstarter project, and he has several new pieces in his shop. If you liked this, also check out these laser-cut works by Eric Standley and Martin Tomsky. (via Hi-Fructose)

mandala-2

mandala-3

mandala-4

mandala-5

mandala-6

mandala-7

mandala-8

 

 



Photography

A Photographer Lovingly Captures the Unlikely Bond between His Family and an Orphaned Bird

March 31, 2015

Christopher Jobson

penguin the magpie

The stories of a unique bond between a child and their pet are as timeless as they come, but rarely does the pet have wings. Such is the case with photographer Cameron Bloom whose son Noah happened upon a baby magpie in 2013 when the family was out walking near their home in Newport, Australia. After consulting with a veterinarian, the family learned to raise the orphaned bird, who they affectionately named Penguin.

A year later, the curious bird has deeply integrated with the family. Despite being free to come and go outdoors, she always returns to the Bloom household where Cameron, his wife Sam, and their sons Rueben, Noah, and Oli eagerly await her return. On rare occasions, Penguin even shows off her adopted family to other magpies who have followed her inside the house.

For the past year, Bloom has dutifully snapped photos which he publishes on a wildly popular Instagram account. Seriously people, it’s amazing; follow it now, ask questions later. The feels. Penguin pretty much gets the run of the house and is free to snuggle with the family in bed, get tangled in their hair, or help with homework.

Just yesterday, New York Times bestselling author Bradley Trevor Greive announced that he’ll be writing a book about Penguin and the Blooms, accompanied by Cameron’s photography. You can see more on his website. All photos shared here courtesy the photographer. (via Beautiful Decay, ABC)

penguin07

penguin the magpie

penguin08

penguin02

penguin09

 

 



Art Science

A Sprawling New Cut Paper Bacterium by Rogan Brown

March 31, 2015

Christopher Jobson

Detail 5

Cut Microbe (2015 handcut paper)

Detail 1

Detail 3

Process 2

Artist Rogan Brown (previously) recently completed work on this new cut paper sculpture titled Cut Microbe. Four months in the making, the piece is a continuation of Brown’s exploration of the human biome and was inspired by the form of salmonella and ecoli bacteria (this 44″ sculpture is about half a million times bigger than the real thing). The sculpture will be on view this May as part of a commission by the Eden Project in the UK. You can see more of Rogan’s work on his website.

 

 



Craft Design

Custom Glass Planets Containing the Cremated Remains of Loved Ones

March 30, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

Coor_07

Coor_01

Coor_02

Coor_03

Coor_04

Coor_06

Merry Coor produces ethereal designs from cremated remains within custom glass beads. Coor crafts each bead by hand, first melting glass into a round bead, then spiraling the design out of ashes on top, and finally sealing the design with an outer layer of clear glass. For each bead she not only requests a 1/2 teaspoon of ashes, but also a picture, letter, or story of the deceased so she can develop a personal connection while forming the piece of jewelry.

Coor has been making glass beads for about 15 years, but it wasn’t until last year that she began incorporating ashes into their designs. After this development Coor explained, “My bead making now gave me a new purpose, and a way to honor others, both living and passed.”

Custom beads can be requested by the California-based artist either through her company’s website, Ash Beads, or through her Etsy. (via Laughing Squid, Bored Panda)

 

 



Art

Hyperrealistic Depictions of a Fictional Mouse-Butterfly Species by Lisa Ericson

March 30, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

“Bliss”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 11″x14″

“Bliss”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 11″x 14″

“Perch”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 9″x12″

“Perch”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 9″x 12″

“Gatherer II”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 8″x10″

“Gatherer II”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 8″x 10″

"Gatherer I", Acrylic on Wood Panel, 8″x10″

“Gatherer I”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 8″x 10″

“Hover”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 13″x16″

“Hover”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 13″x 16″

“Artista”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 16″x16″

“Artista”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 16″x 16″

Lisa Ericson‘s logo is just as enchanting as her hyperrealistic paintings, a tiny mouse with butterfly wings floating between her first and last name. Ericson works as a multi-hyphenate, utilizing her visual talents as an artist, illustrator, and designer to craft meaningful images for both her client and personal practice.

In her newest series Ericson skillfully depicts her invented species of mouse-butterfly while they explore environments filled with detailed mushrooms, forgotten tin jars, and forest brush while sometimes clutching found objects such as acorns and raspberries.

Ericson’s first exhibition, and one featuring this series, is displayed at Portland’s Antler Gallery alongside Heiko Müller and John Casey until April, 27th. During my research I also learned that Ericson illustrated Ramona Ausubel’s website (one of my favorite contemporary authors), and can be seen here. (via This Isn’t Happiness, Hi-Fructose)

 

 



Photography

A Black and Blue Life: A Coal Miner Becomes a Photographer of Exquisite Waves and Seascapes

March 30, 2015

Christopher Jobson

Convection - Ray Collins

Australian photographer Ray Collins first picked up a camera in 2007 and used it to photograph his friends surfing around his home after long shifts working in a nearby coal mine. His attention quickly shifted from his friends to patterns and forms he noticed in the waves. Collins, who is colorblind, was also drawn to the interplay of light and water, perhaps more attune to contrast than the nuance of color. He poetically refers to this switch from coal miner to fine art photographer as a balance between his “black life and blue life.”

The accolades, awards, and sponsorships have been heaped on Collins leading to the publication of his first book, Found at Sea, he also has a wide variety of prints on his website, and you can follow his photography day-to-day on Instagram. (via Laughing Squid)

Underwater - Ray Collins

Fury - Ray Collins

Ominous - Ray Collins

Beneath The Vortex - Ray Collins

Viscous  - Ray Collins

Ripples - Ray Collins

Rainbow - Ray Collins

ray-11

Sunburst - Ray Collins

 

 



Animation History

The Ballad of Holland Island House: An Animated Short Created by Painting with Clay on Glass

March 30, 2015

Christopher Jobson

Built in the late 1880s, Holland Island House was the last surviving structure on an rapidly eroding island in the Chesapeake Bay. The island’s inhabitants were forced from the island in the 1920s, but this one Victorian structure stood for decades as the land around it disappeared. After numerous attempts to save it, the house finally collapsed into the ocean in October of 2010.

In her stop-motion short The Ballad of Holland Island House, animator Lynn Tomlinson shares the story of the house through an innovative clay-on-glass animation technique. Every single frame was painted by hand with clay and photographed, a medium that lends itself perfectly to depicting ocean currents, memory, and the passage of time. Music by Anna & Elizabeth.

ballad-1

ballad-4

ballad-2

ballad-3

anim-holland-2