A Giant Mirrored Building Facade Turns Anyone into Spiderman

A Giant Mirrored Building Facade Turns Anyone into Spiderman optical illusion mirrors installation architecture

A Giant Mirrored Building Facade Turns Anyone into Spiderman optical illusion mirrors installation architecture

A Giant Mirrored Building Facade Turns Anyone into Spiderman optical illusion mirrors installation architecture

How fun is this? Bâtiment (Building) is a mirrored installation by artist Leandro Erlich currently on display at Le 104 in Paris as part of their In_Perceptions exhibition. The piece is clever in its simplicity: a massive building facade is constructed on the floor near a towering mirror giving anyone reflected the uncanny appearance of being weightless. Optical illusions are familiar territory for Erlich, whose pool installation appears to plunge air-breathing gallery patrons several feet underwater. Bâtiment is on display through March 2012. (via present and correct, lonely planet)

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Currency Portraits by Senseteam

Currency Portraits by Senseteam portraits paper money currency

Currency Portraits by Senseteam portraits paper money currency

Currency Portraits by Senseteam portraits paper money currency

Currency Portraits by Senseteam portraits paper money currency

Using thin strips of dissected currency from around the world, Chinese creative firm Senseteam (website currently down) has composed a series of portraits for a book and poster series entitled Big Business 3 meant to “reflect the subtle relationships and influences across money, desire, society, nations, and human beings.” The project won a gold award at the Design for Asia Award 2011 and you can see much more over on designboom.

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This is What Madeline Did in 2011

This is What Madeline Did in 2011 life documentary

This is What Madeline Did in 2011 life documentary

An entire year of LA artist Madeline Schichtel’s life condensed into a second of video per day. Madeline does more things than I do. And might have a few cats. (via stellar)

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Flickr Finds No. 12

Flickr Finds No. 12 flickr finds compilation
Shirren Lim

Flickr Finds No. 12 flickr finds compilation
michellerlee

Flickr Finds No. 12 flickr finds compilation
Hengki Koentjoro

Flickr Finds No. 12 flickr finds compilation
Michael Surtrees

Flickr Finds No. 12 flickr finds compilation
Jeen Na

Flickr Finds No. 12 flickr finds compilation
Luca Pierro

Flickr Finds No. 12 flickr finds compilation
Dmitry Savin

Flickr Finds No. 12 flickr finds compilation
Terence Chang

Here’s your bi-weekly roundup of great photography, it was almost impossible to winnow it down to just these few. All images linked to their sources. See previous Flickr Finds.

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Beyond the Borders of Postage Stamps

Beyond the Borders of Postage Stamps stamps postcards painting mail

Beyond the Borders of Postage Stamps stamps postcards painting mail

Beyond the Borders of Postage Stamps stamps postcards painting mail

Beyond the Borders of Postage Stamps stamps postcards painting mail

Beyond the Borders of Postage Stamps stamps postcards painting mail

Beyond the Borders of Postage Stamps stamps postcards painting mail

New York-based artist Molly Rausch paints the extended scenes around the edges of postage stamps, imagining the continued horizons and broader stories told by stamp artwork. Via her website:

Each stamp painting begins with an actual postage stamp that is glued down to the paper. Then Rausch paints around the stamp, extending the scene, with watercolor and gouache. As a result, the paintings are quite small – usually around 3 inches tall. Everything is done freehand with a brush; she does not use pens or pencils. She does not paint on the stamp itself. And she does not research the subject, so the extension is completely invented and should not be tested for accuracy.

It’s fun to think how many stories a single postage stamp has, the story of the image printed on it, the story of its physical journey through the postal system, and now a third story told though Rausch’s brush strokes. You can see a gallery of many more via her website. Thanks Molly for sharing your work with Colossal.

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Arresting Portraits by Jonathan Rosser

Arresting Portraits by Jonathan Rosser portraits black and white

Arresting Portraits by Jonathan Rosser portraits black and white

Arresting Portraits by Jonathan Rosser portraits black and white

Arresting Portraits by Jonathan Rosser portraits black and white

Arresting Portraits by Jonathan Rosser portraits black and white

Photographer Jonathan Rosser shoots wonderfully gritty portraits that at times appear like stills from centuries-old silent films, and yet at other times so real and life-like, it’s as if the individuals are peering at you from the other side of your monitor. Rosser has only been shooting for three years and finds his subjects in cities around the U.S. from the streets of Skid Row in L.A. to New York, Baltimore and his home in Washington D.C. The portraits are even more striking when shown against black, so I’ve taken the liberty to link the selections above to lightboxes. Thank you Jonathan for sharing your work with Colossal.

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Birds in Books

Birds in Books illustration books birds

Birds in Books illustration books birds

Birds in Books illustration books birds

Birds in Books illustration books birds

Birds in Books illustration books birds

Pennsylvania artist and designer Paula Swisher takes doodling in the margins of old engineering and science manuals to new heights. She began the illustrations using nothing but ballpoint pen and white-out similar to Mark Powell’s envelopes, but soon explored new materials including colored pencil, gouache and other mixed media like thread and cut-out paper. Via email she tells me:

I’ve been using scientific imagery and information graphics off and on in my work. I seem to be drawn to the contrived sense of order that they show. In the drawings mentioned, superimposing bird imagery, hopefully, creates a visual metaphor for our attempts to make sense of our experiences.

You can see dozens more of her bird artworks here. (via mark powell’s tumblog, through the window i could see the sun)

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