Art

Astonishingly Dense Quilled Paper Rugs by Lisa Nilsson

November 6, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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These astonishing renderings of symmetrically designed carpets are the beginning of a new paper sculpture series by artist Lisa Nilsson (previously) who arranges quilled strips of hand-cut mulberry paper at remarkably small scale. The new paper works are a departure from her earlier exploration of anatomical cross-sections and show a marked leap in her nearly unbelievable vision of paper quilling, something All Things Paper’s Ann Martin boldly states “has never been seen in its hundreds of years as an art form.” Unlike a traditional rug that might be woven row by row, Nilsson instead starts at the very center and progresses slowly outward, a tedious process that takes several months to complete a single piece. If you want to learn more, head over to All Things Paper to read an interview with Nilsson about her process.

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Binding. Quilling dimensions: 17″ x 20″.

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Small Red Rug. Quilling dimensions: 9″ x 12″.

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Design Science

An Aerial Laser Display Capable of Projecting 3D Objects in Mid-Air

November 5, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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A team of researchers in Japan lead by Akira Asano of Burton Inc. have developed a 3D aerial display capable of projecting text and imagery in mid-air. The Aerial Burton works by firing a 1kHz infrared pulse directly into a 3D scanner which in turn focuses and reflects the laser to a specific point in the air. Molecules at the end of the laser then ionize, releasing energy in the form of photons. While the full potential for such a display has yet to be seen, Asano suggests it could be used as a communication aid in the event of a disaster by communicating evacuation routes or broadcasting the location of emergency supplies. Personally, I would be satisfied with a 3D laser butterfly in my backyard. (via DigInfo)

 

 



Design History Illustration

An Illustrated Cross Section of Hong Kong’s Infamous Kowloon Walled City

November 4, 2014

Johnny Strategy

The Kowloon Walled City in Hong Kong was built gradually—building on top of building—over time. Without a single architect, the ungoverned and most densely populated district became a haven for drugs, crime and prostitution until it was demolished in 1993. Photo documentation of the site exists but for the most part much of the inner-workings of the city remained a mystery.

Perhaps due to its proximity, Japan, in particular, developed a keen interest towards Kowloon. Its demolition in 1993 was broadcast on national television. But watching the footage, what most spectators didn’t realize was that up until the night before demolition a team of Japanese researchers were taking precise measurements and documenting the vacated city. Their findings were compiled into a book that, among other things, featured this panoramic cross section of the city depicting what life was like inside. You can read more about the book on Spoon & Tamago, and if you look hard enough, a few rare copies of it are available online. (via deconcrete)

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Design Music

A New Acoustic Instrument That Creates Sounds like a Digital Synthesizer

November 4, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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The Yaybahar is a new acoustic instrument designed by Istanbul-based musician Görkem Şen that emits music right out of a retro sci-fi movie, a remarkable feat considering there isn’t a bit of electricity involved. The Yaybahar can be played in a variety of different ways using mallets or with a bow, relying on a combination of two drum-like membranes, long springs, and a tall fretted neck to create music. Like any instrument, it’s capable of producing sounds that run the gamut from “beautiful music” to “noise.” Give it a listen! (via The Creators Project)

Update: Here’s a video (in Turkish) of Şen giving a TEDx talk earlier this year where he plays a similar bow and spring-type instrument. (thnx, JR!)

 

 



Art Design

Spectacular Paper Pop-up Sculptures Designed by Peter Dahmen

November 4, 2014

Christopher Jobson

While studying graphic design in college, German artist Peter Dahmen was given the assignment of creating a 3D object out of paper. He soon realized a small problem. Regardless of what he designed, there was no safe way to transport it to class on his daily train commute. Instead of risking damage to his project, Dahmen devised a way to make his paper sculpture fold flat like a pop-up book, a fateful decision that changed the course of his life. He enjoyed the challenge so much that be became obsessed with creating more elaborate designs, eventually leading to a full-time career as a paper engineer.

Filmmaker Christopher Helkey recently sat down with Dahmen as he demonstrates some of his more incredible paper sculptures, many more of which you can see on his YouTube channel. If you liked this, also check out Matthew Shlian.

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Photography

An Owl Flying Straight into a Camera Looks like a Hovering Spaceship

November 4, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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British photographer Russell Savory captured this amazing shot earlier this summer of an owl flying directly toward his camera. With its wings pulled back, it looks like a hovering two-eyed spaceship. Though don’t let the perspective fool you, Savory was shooting from a distance with a 600mm telephoto lens.

 

 



Art

Leaf Beasts: Simple Animal Sculptures Cut from Dried Magnolia Leaves

November 3, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Leaf Beast is a recent project by freelance illustrator and artist Baku Maeda that seemingly brings dead leaves back to life. Maeda took advantage of the warped shape and veiny structure of dried magnolia leaves and made only minimal cuts to create each piece. See Part I and Part II. (via Laughing Squid, Lustik)