Graffiti Meets Sculpture in Colorful Figures that Explode Through the Canvas by Shaka


Sans Titre, 2012


Human Behaviour #1, 2012


Human Behaviour #1, detail


Autoportrait, 2009


Mort Face Prix, 2010, photo by Marie Aschehoug-Clauteaux


Stress, 2009


Street Allegory, 2010

French artist Shaka (Marchal Mithouard) explores a wild intersection between painting, sculpture and graffiti with his colorfully explosive bas-relief sculptures that seem to cross from the canvas into reality. The aggressive human figures formed from a multitude of intertwined objects are partially inspired by the works of Caravaggio, Arcimboldo, and Van Gogh, all of whom the artists cites as influences in his work. Shaka had a recent solo show at Seize Gallery in Marseille, France and he has a number of prints available in his shop. Photographer Marie Aschehoug-Clauteaux also has a huge gallery of his works worth exploring.

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Dream Music II: A Trippy Stop-Motion Music Video Made from 15,000 Stills

This new music video from Marc Donahue and Sean Michael Williams starring Beau Brigham was shot over a six month period in two states and is the second part of a two part series that explores some interesting ideas in animation and what they describe as “lyric lapsing”. According to the producers the final edit is comprised of some 15,000 stills and involved 6-8 hours of work to produce just 3-4 seconds of footage. I urge you to stick with it for at least a minute as there are some increasingly amazing sequences after that. (via booooooom)

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New Geometric Paper Art from Matthew Shlian

Paper artist Matthew Shlian (previously) who refers to himself perhaps more appropriately as a paper engineer, has a new series of intricate paper sculptures which are cut and constructed by hand as part of a process that involves more math than you could shake a protractor at. Via Ghostly International:

Matthew Shlian works within the increasingly nebulous space between art and engineering. As a paper engineer, Shlian’s work is rooted in print media, book arts, and commercial design, though he frequently finds himself collaborating with a cadre of scientists and researchers who are just now recognizing the practical connections between paper folding and folding at microscopic and nanoscopic scales.

I highly suggest watching the video above by Jakob Skogheim to learn more about his process (he admits to failing algebra in high school), and it looks like a few of his new works are still available in the Ghostly Shop but I imagine they’ll get snapped up pretty quick. Also, don’t miss his 2010 TEDx talk. (via illusion)

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Mosaics Created from Thousands of Hand-Cast Resin Flowers and Candy


What Remains, 35,000+ hand cast urethane flowers


What Remains, detail


What Remains, detail


What Remains, detail


What Remains, detail


A Rose By Any Other Name, 15,000+ individually hand cast urethane pieces of candy, 75 pounds


A Rose By Any Other Name, detail


A Rose By Any Other Name, detail


A Rose By Any Other Name, detail

New York artist Kevin Champeny merges aspects of painting, sculpture and mosaics with his large-scale images of skulls, flowers, and other objects. While the idea of creating images using thousands of components like this might not be particularly new, Champeny challenges himself by creating each tiny element by hand. He starts by building silicone molds of the original pieces, then casts them in color (meaning nothing is painted, each hue has to be mixed and cast) using various poly-urethane resins. The final objects numbering in the tens of thousands are then painstaking glued to a surface piece by piece, meaning that the entire process for each artwork spans several months to design, sculpt, mold, and cast. Amazingly the skull above is made from over 35,000 handmade flowers while the rose uses 15,000 resin candies. You can see much more of his work on his blog.

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This is Not a Photograph: Amazing Portrait Drawn with Ballpoint Pens by Samuel Silva

Nope, not a photograph. This is an amazing portrait drawn by 29-year-old Portugal-based attorney Samuel Silva (he says art is just his “hobby”) based on a photograph by Russian photographer Kristina Tararina. Silva’s medium of choice is standard Bic ballpoint pens on paper and this particular portrait uses eight different colors, taking some 30 hours to complete. The drawing went gangbusters on Reddit last night and Silva fields a number of questions about his work over on deviantART. You can see many more of Silva’s drawings here.

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Antenna Telescopes on the Streets of Birmingham, UK

I love this piece seen on the streets of Digbeth, Birmingham, UK photographed by Davyd Samuels and Adrian Taylor. Anyone know the artist? (via street art utopia)

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Photographer Caleb Charland Wires Apple Trees, Fruit Baskets and Stacked Coins to Create Alternative Batteries


Lamp powered by 300 live apples, 2012


Vinegar Battery, 2011


Fruit Battery Still Life (Citrus), 2012


Coin Battery, 2010

Portland, Maine-based photographer Caleb Charland frequently merges art and science with his photographic experiments involving electricity, fire, and magnetism. One of his ongoing projects involves a series of alternative power sources created using fruit, coins, and even vinegar to power the lights in his long exposure photographs. The apple photograph above involved a nearly 11-hour setup as he carefully hammered 300 zinc-coated galvanized nails into apples (zinc reacts with acid in the apples creating electricity, science!) and used copper wiring to transfer the current to a standard living room lamp. Even then, the light was so dim it required a 4-hour exposure during which Charland fended off ravenous deer through the night with an impromptu shaker made from a tin can and wire nuts. You can read much more about the ordeal over on Discover, and here’s a video of the entire project coming together.

Caleb recent launched a new website where you can access a few years of his photography, I strongly urge you to at least look at his Demonstrations gallery. He’ll also have a few prints in an upcoming group show at Brancolini Grimaldi in London this September.

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