Shadowy Optical Illusion Mural by Strøk in Italy 

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Anne Esser

As part of the Memorie Urbane street art festival in Italy, Norweigan stencil artist Anders Gjennestad (aka Strøk) painted this shadowy mural on the side of an old school. This is just one of numerous pieces created for the festival including many Colossal favorites like Pixel Pancho, Seth, Pablo Herrero, Natalia Rak, Levalet, Ernest Zacherevic, Etam Cru, David de la Mano, and Alice Pasquini. (via Fecal Face)

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Anne Esser

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Anne Esser

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Anne Esser

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Anne Esser

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Exquisite Japanese Floral Hair Ornaments Handcrafted from Resin by Sakae 

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Based in Narita City, Japanese artist Sakae creates exquisite hair ornaments known as kanzashi. The traditional hair pieces have been around for quite some time in Japan, but these pieces—each hand-crafted from resin with a delicate brass wire around the edges—are startlingly realistic and the most beautiful we’ve ever seen. Depending on the complexity of the pieces they can take anywhere between 3 and 30 days. If you’re trying to get your hands on one of these, don’t get your hopes up. Sakae only occasionally puts one up for sale. And when she does it’s through Yahoo Auctions in Japan. Her latest auction just closed earlier this week. It attracted 215 buyers and finally sold for 400,000 yen. You can keep up with her (and her auctions) on her Facebook page or see her previous work on flickr. (via Mister Finch)

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New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco 

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Photographer Oleg Oprisco (previously) who lives and works in Kiev, continues to wow us with his vivid style of conceptual photography that places subjects in the middle of surreal and fantastic tableaus. Oprisco spends large amounts of time scouring flea markets and resale shops to collect props, costumes, and other items for each shot which he often sketches beforehand in a sketchbook, with the final shoot requiring 2-3 days of preparation. I love this bit from an interview with 500px earlier this year where he was asked to give advice to amateur/student photographers:

I strongly advise to use your time wisely. Laziness is your worst enemy. Enough looking at photographs taken by your idols. You’ve commented on enough work that you hate. It’s time to take photos. Your best photos. Let go and shoot, shoot, shoot!

All of Oprisco’s work is available as prints which you can inquire about directly. You can see more of his recent work on Flickr and Facebook. (via 500px)

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Animal and Insect Sculptures Wrapped in Crocheted Webbing by Joana Vasconcelos 

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In an ongoing series by Joana Vasconcelos, the Portuguese artist has been wrapping various animals—wasps, lizards, snakes, crabs, lobsters, frogs, bull-heads, donkey heads, horse heads, wolves and even cats—in five-needle lace, handmade cotton crochet. But these aren’t any old animals. Vasconcelos has appropriated the ceramic artwork of Rafael Bordalo Pinheiro (1846-1905), one of the most renowned Portuguese artists of the 19th century.

Each of the pieces “are ambiguously imprisoned/protected by a second-skin in crochet-work,” says Vasconcelos. At once both beautiful and strange, the work stands as a testament to the extraordinary craftsmanship of the artist but also as a one-upmanship of maternal femininity and domesticity. The use of crochet to mummify the ceramic animals “opens up a vast and rich field of interpretation” that challenges our preconceptions of femininity, as well as our notions of tradition and modernity. (via Trendland, Ghost in the Machine)

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Angélica, 2013

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Urban Jewelry: Lace Street Art by NeSpoon 

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Warsaw-based artist NeSpoon uses ornate lace patterns in her unique brand of street art that translates into ceramics, stencils, paintings, and crocheted webbing installed in public spaces. NeSpoon refers to her art as “public jewelry,” specifically as an act of beautification by turning abandoned and unadorned spaces into something aesthetically pleasing. You can see much more over on Behance. (via My Modern Met, Unurth)

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Marilyn Myller: A New Stop-Motion Animation Made with Styrofoam Puppets and Long-Exposure Light Effects by Mikey Please 

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Animator and director Mikey Please of Parabella Animation Studio just released his latest stop-motion animation project, Marilyn Miller. The film screened at numerous festivals like Sundance and SXSW over the last year, picking up plenty of accolades along the way, and is now available online for the first time. Marilyn Miller is a followup to Please’s BAFTA-winning animation The Eagleman Stag, and makes heavy use of tediously sculpted styrofoam models and complex long-exposure lighting to tell a story of creation and destruction. The film was photographed and animated by Mikey Please and Dan Ojari. And you can see a bit of behind-the-scenes footage here. (via Colossal Submissions)

Update: There’s a great writeup by Jason Sondhi about Marilyn Myller over Short of the Week.

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