Walking City: An Evolving Video Sculpture Morphs in Response to Architecture 

walking-2

Anyone who follows Colossal knows that digital animation and motion graphics are a rarity here, but this clip is a solid exception. Created by Universal Everything, Walking City is a slowly evolving video sculpture that gradually changes form through dozens of permutations while the core motion, the act of walking, remains the same. Via Universal Everything:

Referencing the utopian visions of 1960’s architecture practice Archigram, Walking City is a slowly evolving video sculpture. The language of materials and patterns seen in radical architecture transform as the nomadic city walks endlessly, adapting to the environments she encounters.

At almost 8 minutes long it’s a captivating view for such a simple premise, it’s fun to imagine the buildings and architectural designs that inspire each step. (via Colossal Submissions)

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Highlights from the 2014 Sony World Photography Awards Shortlist 

sony-1
That’s dance. © Hasan Baglar, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards

sony-2
Lightsnake. © Holger Schmidtke, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards

sony-3
In your youth, nothing can stop you from enjoying time with your friends, especially not a simple matter of rain during summer fun. You may grow up and forget the names, but you’ll always remember the moments, the time on the dock with your friends during a surprise shower. © Samantha Fortenberry, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards.

sony-4
A baby Orangutan peeking out from his mother’s embrace. © Chin Boon Leng, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards.

sony-5
Homebound. © Ata Mohammad Adnan, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards.

sony-6
In July each year, this heart-pounding scene of wildebeests migration repeats itself in Kenya. © Bonnie Cheung, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards.

sony-7
Aerial image of river delta in Iceland. © Emmanuel Coupe, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards.

sony-8
Pilgrims and devotees cross pontoon bridges at the Maha Kumbh Mela – the largest spiritual gathering on the planet, held every 12 years in India. © Wolfgang Weinhardt, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards.

sony-9
An overhead view, from the skies above Poland. © Kacper Kowalski, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards.

sony-10
Interior of an abandoned cooling tower. © Jan Stel, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards.

sony-11
China, Jiangyin, Jiangsu. Rows of identical houses with a playground seen in the middle in the city of Jiangyin. © Kacper Kowalski, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards.

sony-12
A muddy face from the mud bath, going into the lake. © Alpay Erdem, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards.

sony-13
The knight and his steed, a tropical capture in Costa Rica. © Nicolas Reusens, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards.

sony-14
Disaster Zone. © Alison Crea, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards.

The World Photography Organization just announced the shortlist for the 2014 Sony World Photography Awards. This year’s contest received more than 140,000 entries from 166 countries. The judges will announce the final winners in March and April of this year, but for now here are a selection of highlights from the shortlist courtesy the World Photography Organization. (via Next Draft)

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Carcass: A Scale Replica of a Fast Food Kitchen Carved Entirely from Wood by Roxy Paine 

carcas-1
Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

carcas-2
Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

carcas-3
Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

carcas-4
Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

carcas-5
Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

carcas-6
Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

carcas-7
Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

carcas-8
Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

carcas-9
Carcass, 2013. Birch, maple, glass, fluorescent lighting. 13’ 10 13/16” x 20’ 1/2” x 13’ 7” H. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

When first viewing this large diorama by Roxy Paine, you’re struck by the paradox of what you think you should be seeing and what is actually in front of you. It’s clear this is an expertly executed replica of a fast food restaurant counter complete with order screens, straw dispensers and a soft-serve ice cream machine; but devoid of flashy logos, food, or any other visual cues whatsoever, all that seems to remain is an empty shell—a carcass—carved entirely from birch and maple wood.

Titled Carcass, the installation was one of two large-scale dioramas on view at Kavi Gupta Gallery as part of Paine’s first solo show in Chicago, Apparatus. Via the gallery:

With Apparatus, Roxy Paine introduces a new chapter in his work, a series of large scale dioramas. Inspired by spaces and environments designed to be activated via human interaction, a fast-food restaurant and a control room, the dioramas present spaces and objects which are hand carved from birch and maple wood and formed from steel, encased and frozen in time, void of human presence, making their inherent function obsolete. Rooted in the Greek language, diorama translates to “through that which is seen”, a definition that has evolved throughout time as dioramas became conventionally known as physical windowed and encased rooms used as educational tools. Paine transforms the environments on display by using the diorama’s traditional experience as a tool to create a contemplative experience where what we see behind the glass transitions between being real and being a mere shell of something real.

The additional installation, Control Room (shown in the video above), similarly depicts an extraordinarily detailed collection of switches and knobs, a control center with an unknown function. You can learn more about both pieces over at Kavi Gupta. All photos by Joseph Rynkiewicz, courtesy the gallery.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Spontaneous Temporary Sand Paintings by Joe Mangrum 

Image 2

Image 3

Image 6

Image 7

Image 8

Image 9

Image 10

Since 2006 artist Joe Mangrum has taken to the streets of New York, Chicago, San Francisco and elsewhere armed with sacks of colored sand that he sprinkles by the handful to create sprawling temporary paintings. Each work is spontaneous in its design and evolves as Mangrum works, spending upwards of 6-8 hours hunched over the ground to complete each piece. The artist estimates he’s completed nearly 550 paintings over the last few years. A graduate of the Art Institute of Chicago, his paintings have appeared at The Corcoran Gallery, the Museum of Arts and Design in NYC, as well as The Asia Society. He also made a recent appearance on Sesame Street. You can see works in progress over on Facebook, and limited edition prints are available through King Art Collective.

See related posts on Colossal about .

New Flexible Paper Sculptures by Li Hongbo 

hongbo-1
Courtesy Klein Sun Gallery

hongbo
Filmed by Audrey Kwok at Artstage 2014 in Singapore

Li_Hongbo_Bust_of_David_paper_70x50x50cm_2012_1
Courtesy Klein Sun Gallery

Li_Hongbo_Bust_of_David_paper_70x50x50cm_2012_2
Courtesy Klein Sun Gallery

Li_Hongbo_Bust_of_Marseilles_paper_60x36x35cm_2012_1
Courtesy Klein Sun Gallery

Li_Hongbo_Bust_of_Marseilles_paper_60x36x35cm_2012_2
Courtesy Klein Sun Gallery

Li_Hongbo_Bust_of_Michelangelo_paper_50x20x25cm_2012_1
Courtesy Klein Sun Gallery

Li_Hongbo_Bust_of_Michelangelo_paper_50x20x25cm_2012_2
Courtesy Klein Sun Gallery

Li_Hongbo_Mouth_paper_17x25x15cm_2013_1
Courtesy Klein Sun Gallery

Li_Hongbo_Mouth_paper_17x25x15cm_2013_2
Courtesy Klein Sun Gallery

Currently on view at Klein Sun Gallery in New York, artist Li Hongbo (previously) has an exhibition of new and old work titled Tools of Study. Hongbo is known for his unconventional figurative sculptures made from thousands of sheets of flexible paper that twist and elongate in almost any direction, many of which take several months to complete. Via Klein Sun:

Li Hongbo’s stunning, stretchable, paper sculptures, inspired by both traditional folk art and his time as a student learning to sculpt, challenge our perceptions. With a technique influenced by his fascination with traditional Chinese decorations known as paper gourds—made from glued layers of paper—Li Hongbo applies a honeycomb-like structure to form remarkably flexible sculptures.

An investigation into expression through one of the oldest mediums in history, Li Hongbo invites viewers to experience paper and sculpture in a revolutionary and insightful new way. Utilizing his expert knowledge of paper’s natural strengths and weaknesses, the artist has transformed the media to stretch, twist, elongate and retract as if it were a giant slinky. Through this juxtaposition of playful mobility and a traditional aesthetic, Li Hongbo breathes a unique life into his works that stuns and awes the viewer.

You can see his work up close at Klein Sun through March 2, 2014 and Arrested Motion stopped by to shoot some great installation views.

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Page 278 of 746«...277278279280...»