New Ornate Insects Drawn by Alex Konahin 

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Latvia-based graphic artist and illustrator Alex Konahin (previously) recently completed work on a new series of ornate insect drawings titled Little Wings. The illustrations were made using pens and india ink in his distinctive style that makes used of ornate scrolls and intricate floral designs. If this is the first time you’ve seen Konahin’s work, be sure to check out his amazing Anatomy drawings, and you can also see lots more on Facebook and Tumblr. (via Faith is Torment)

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Gingerbread Art Museums by Caitlin Levin and Henry Hargreaves 

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Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Frank Lloyd Wright. Icing, gingerbread, cotton candy, candy wrappers, licorice, sugar.

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Karuizawa Museum, Nagano, Yasui Hideo. Chocolate, gingerbread, hard candy, cotton candy, sour flush.

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The Louvre, Paris, I.M.Pei. Gingerbread, hard candy, licorice.

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Museum Aan de Stroom (MAS), Antwerp, Neutelings Riedijk Architects. Gingerbread, lego candy, hard candy, sesame candy, chocolate, bubble gum, sour rolls.

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Maxxi – National Museum of the 21st Century Arts, Rome, Zaha Hadid. Gingerbread, hard candy, lollipop sticks.

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Museo Soumaya, Mexico City, Fernando Romero. Candy balls, gingerbread, sour rolls, taffy.

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Tate Modern, London, Herzog & de Meuron. Gingerbread, hard candy, cotton candy, bubble gum.

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Recently completed for display at Dylan’s Candy Bar during Art Basel Miami, these towering architectural creations of the world’s most famous art museums and galleries were created with gingerbread and candy by food artists Caitlin Levin and Henry Hargreaves. An array of hard candy windows forms the iconic pyramid extension at the Louvre, while icing and gingerbread form the smooth curves of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Some of the iconic structures are so immaculately detailed that once photographed in black and white they almost look like the real thing. You can see more behind the scenes photos here.

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The @FacesPics Twitter Account Posts Fun Anthropomorphic Photos Containing Hidden Faces 

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If you’re a fan of quick visual jokes, I heartily recommend following the new Twitter account @FacesPics that archives photographs of objects, buildings, and other things that look unmistakably like faces of people or animals. Launched earlier this month the account already has 162,000 followers and counting, and for good reason. Sure, some of these photos have been bouncing around for ages, but it’s good they’ve finally found a home.

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Nature Imitates Andy Goldsworthy: Rare Ice Disk Forms in North Dakota River 

When I first saw this giant rotating ice disk spotted in North Dakota this week, I assumed it had to be some kind of human-created object, perhaps a new piece by famed land artist Andy Goldsworthy. The video above was shot by retired engineer George Loegering while hiking along the Sheyenne River. He estimates the rotating disk was some 55 feet in diameter and must have been forming for some time. The St. Paul Pioneer Press spoke with National Weather Service hydrologist Allen Schlag:

The cold, dense air—the air pressure Saturday in nearby Fargo was a record high for the city for the month of November, according to Gust—turned the river water into ice, but since the water was relatively warm it didn’t happen all at once. Floating bits of ice got caught in the eddy and started to spin in a circle.

“It’s not a continuous sheet of ice,” Schlag said. “If you were to throw a grapefruit-size rock on it, it would go through. It’s not a solid piece of ice—it’s a collection of ice cubes.”

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Photo by Brook Tyler

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Photo by Pål Sigurd

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Photo by Evan Gregg / Reservoir Productions

Although extremely rare, ice disks do indeed appear naturally from time to time when conditions are perfect. Above are a few examples of people who have been lucky enough to stumble onto one while holding a camera. Learn more over on St. Paul Pioneer Press. (thnx Ben + all)

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A Herd of 99 Lifelike Animals Drink From a Pool at QAGOMA 

heritage-1Heritage, 2013. 99 life-sized replicas of animals, water, sand, drip mechanism. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Natasha Harth, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

heritage-2Heritage, 2013. 99 life-sized replicas of animals, water, sand, drip mechanism. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Natasha Harth, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

heritage-3Heritage, 2013. 99 life-sized replicas of animals, water, sand, drip mechanism. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Natasha Harth, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

heritage-4Heritage, 2013. 99 life-sized replicas of animals, water, sand, drip mechanism. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Natasha Harth, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

heritage-9Heritage, 2013. 99 life-sized replicas of animals, water, sand, drip mechanism. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Mark Sherwood, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

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Head On, 2006. 99 life-sized replicas of wolves and glass wall. Wolves: gauze, resin, and hide. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Natasha Harth, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

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Head On, 2006. 99 life-sized replicas of wolves and glass wall. Wolves: gauze, resin, and hide. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Natasha Harth, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

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Head On, 2006. 99 life-sized replicas of wolves and glass wall. Wolves: gauze, resin, and hide. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Natasha Harth, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

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Head On, 2006. 99 life-sized replicas of wolves and glass wall. Wolves: gauze, resin, and hide. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Natasha Harth, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

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Artist Cai Guo-Qiang sculpting an animal for Heritage. Photograph: Cai Canhuang.

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Artist Cai Guo-Qiang sculpting an animal for Heritage. Photograph: Cai Canhuang.

Inspired by a trip to Stradbroke Island in Australia back in 2011, artist Cai Guo-Qiang began work on his newest large-scale installation, Heritage, a flock of 99 life-size replicas of wild animals including giraffes, pandas, lions, tigers, and kangaroos drinking from a pool of blue water. The piece is included along with several additional artworks as part of his first solo exhibition in Australia, Falling Back to Earth, at Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art in South Brisbane.

Also included in the exhibition is Guo-Qiang’s famous airborne cascade of 99 wolves titled Head On, where the animals seem to launch themselves into the air only to crash into a large glass wall and begin the cycle again. You can see more behind-the-scenes photos in the video above and on the artists blog. Falling Back to Earth runs through May 11, 2014.

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Ornate Mixed Media Assemblages by Kris Kuksi 

kris-1Unveiled Obscurity, 2013. Mixed media assemblage. 32″ x 46″ x 12″.

kris-2Unveiled Obscurity, detail.

kris-3Neo-Hellenism, 2013. Mixed media assemblage. 37″ x 35″ x 11″.

kris-4Neo-Hellenism, detail.

kris-5Intelligent Redesign, 2013. Mixed media assemblage. 40″ x 50″ x 12″.

kris-10Intelligent Redesign, detail.

kris-6Expulsion, 2013. Mixed media assemblage. 24″ x 32″ x 9″.

kris-7Expulsion, detail.

kris-9Der Ubermensch of the Post-Post World Calamity Variety, 2013. Mixed media assemblage. 54″ x 48″ x 16″.

This week Kansas-based artist Kris Kuksi (previously) opened his fourth solo show, Revival, at Joshua Liner Gallery. Kuksi continues his use of ornate assemblage to create wildly complex sculptures that comment on history, life, death, and spiritual conflict. In the words of director Guillermo del Toro:

“A postindustrial Rococo master, Kris Kuksi obsessively arranges characters and architecture with an exquisite sense of drama. Instead of stones and shells he uses screaming plastic soldiers, miniature engine blocks, towering spires and assorted debris to form his landscapes. The political, spiritual, and material conflict within these shrines is enacted under the calm gaze of remote deities and august statuary. Kuksi manages to evoke, at once, a sanctum and a mausoleum for our suffocated spirit.

Revival will be on view through January 18, 2014 and you can see many more pieces from the exhibition in this gallery.

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