Internal Landscapes: Sweeping Abstract Oceans by Samantha Keely Smith 









Artist Samantha Keely Smith paints abstract oceanic landscapes that are at once menacing and serene, a clash of light and color that she refers to as “internal landscapes.” Using oil paint, enamel, and shellac, Smith uses an additive and subtractive process by partially destroying her progress several times before completion. This cyclical process, much like the timeless crash of ocean tides against the shore, adds an additional level of texture to her work. She shares in a 2013 interview with NeverLazy Magazine:

My images are not at all real places or even inspired by real places. They are emotional and psychological places. Internal landscapes, if you will. The tidal pull and power of the ocean makes sense to me in terms of expressing these things, and I think that is why some of the work has a feel of water about it. My work speaks of things that are timeless, and I think that for most of us the ocean represents something timeless.

Currently based in New York, Smith generally doesn’t work with galleries but instead interacts directly with collectors. You can see more recent work on Tumblr and Facebook. (via My Modern Met, Incomplete)

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New Blurred Cityscapes by Valerio D’Ospina 

Cattedrale di Milano (2014). Oil on canvas, 40 x 40in.

Manhattan (2013). Oil on panel, 35 x 48in.

Driving on Madison Avenue (2013). Oil on panel, 48 x 24in.

Broadway and West 25th (2013). Oil on panel, 24 x 16.5in.

Duomo di Milano (2012) Oil on linen, 39 x 56in. / Facade (2012). Oil on panel, 24 x 30in.

Bivio (2011). Oil on panel, 40 x 24in.

La Strada (2014). Oil on panel, 48 x 40in.

It’s hard not to get lost in these dramatically blurred architectural renderings and cityscapes of New York and Italy by Italian painter Valerio D’Ospina (previously). The artist transforms the street The Pennsylvania-based artist most recently had a show last year at Mason Murer, and you can now follow him on Facebook and Instagram. (This Isn’t Happiness)

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Spectacular Genetic Anomaly Results in Butterflies with Male and Female Wings 

James K. Adams, Professor of Biology, Dalton State College


Andrew D. Warren, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History



Kim Davis, Mike Stangeland, and Andrew Warren, Butterflies of America

In the realm of genetic anomalies found in living organisms perhaps none is more visually striking than bilateral gynandromorphism, a condition where an animal or insect contains both male and female characteristics, evenly split, right down the middle. While cases have been reported in lobsters, crabs and even in birds, it seems butterflies and moths lucked out with the visual splendor of having both male and female wings as a result of the anomaly. For those interested in the science, here’s a bit from Elise over at IFLScience:

In insects the mechanism is fairly well understood. A fly with XX chromosomes will be a female. However, an embryo that loses a Y chromosome still develops into what looks like an adult male, although it will be sterile. It’s thought that bilateral gynandromorphism occurs when two sperm enter an egg. One of those sperm fuses with the nucleus of the egg and a female insect develops. The other sperm develops without another set of chromosomes within the same egg. Both a male and a female insect develop within the same body.

Above are some great examples of bilateral gynandromorphism, but follow the links above and below for many more. (via Live Science, The Endless Airshow, Butterflies of America, IFLScience)

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Retro Technology LEGO Kits by Chris McVeigh 









Jack-of-all-trades artist and designer Chris McVeigh creates these awesome minimalist Lego models of outmoded technology including TVs, video game consoles, as well as analog phones and cameras. Not only does he design and photograph them, but also makes them available as sets you can buy in his shop, or as instructions you can download freely on his site. He also turns many of his LEGO-themed illustrations and photos into prints which you can find on Society6. (via Stellar)

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Suspended Floral Installations by Rebecca Louise Law 








Rebecca Louise Law is a London-based installation artist known for her transformation of spaces using hundreds or thousands of suspended flowers. Trained in fine art at Newcastle University in England, Law has been working with natural materials for 17 years, a practice that involves a constant exploration of relationships between nature and humans. Over the past few years she has worked in numerous public spaces, museums, and galleries, and has been commissioned by brands like Hermes, Cartier and Gucci.

You can see more of her work over on Yellowtrace, and in her artwork and projects galleries. (via Yellowtrace)

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