Art Photography

Temporary Calligraphy Illuminates Historic Sites Throughout Europe

August 22, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Mexican calligraffiti artist Said Dokins combines calligraphy writing with graffiti techniques to create public murals that address conflicts of power, destruction, and control imposed by both historic and contemporary regimes. His latest project, Heliographies of Memory, uses luminous tools to explore displaced memory, creating light paintings that use famous historic buildings or other iconic sites as temporary backdrops.

“‘Heliographies of Memory’ consist in a series of photographs that capture the calligraphic gesture, the very moment where the action of inscription is taking place,” said Dokins. “…The texts are written with light, so the words disappear as soon as they were suggested by the moves of the calligrapher, invisible to the simple eye, they just can be captured by a process of long-exposure photography, that reveal what happened, even though no one could see it.”

Dokins collaborates with photographer Leonardo Luna to capture each of his ephemeral interventions. Together they opened the 2017 OASTRALE Biennale of Contemporary Art in Dresden with a choreographed calligraphy presentation. You can see more images of their project Heliographies of Memory on Dokins’ Instagram and Facebook. (via I Support Street Art)

 

 



Craft

Incredibly Lifelike Felt Paintings of Pets and Plants by Dani Ives

August 22, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Fiber artist Dani Ives conjures the natural world in her unique take on the traditional craft of needle felting. Ives describes her method as “painting with wool,” in which she applies her love of animals and her background in biology to build intricately layered portraits of a variety of flora and fauna.

Dogs, cats, birds, and farm animals come to life alongside toadstools and fruits, and Ives’ ability to capture the moisture and glint of animal eyes and noses adds an impressive degree of realism. While her plant life depictions take more of a traditional botanical angle, most of Ives’s animal subjects take center stage on the embroidery hoop, peering out at the viewer, further adding to the strong sense of unique personality, and it’s no surprise that she is in high demand for pet portrait commissions.

Ives sells originals and prints of her work on Etsy, and she continues her love of teaching by traveling from her home in Northwest Arkansas to lead workshops around the country, as well as offering e-courses in needle felting. You can also follow her work on Instagram.

 

 



Design

A Secret Work Studio Suspended Below a Highway Overpass by Fernando Abellanas

August 21, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

All images by Jose Manuel Pedrajas, courtesy Lebrel

Spanish furniture designer Fernando Abellanas has carved out a new creative home in a section of Valencia that isn’t the typical artist neighborhood: he’s built a studio affixed to a highway underpass. The workspace is complete with a desk and chair, as well as shelves stocked with homey framed artworks and potted succulents―all attached to the highway’s cement framework. The floor and walls function as a self-operated horizontal elevator. Using mechanics adapted from a metal dolly, Abellanas hand-cranks his way to his studio, completing the picture of a cozy four-walled workspace.

As he described in an interview with le cool Valencia, Abellanas has a lifelong interest in refuges―locating peace and solitude in unexpected places, like under the dinner table as as a child, and now, hidden underneath the whir of traffic. The designer is also inspired by the way people with very limited resources use neglected spaces to create homes.

The studio hasn’t been sanctioned by the city of Valencia, so its exact location is a secret, and it will remain intact for as long as Abellanas is able to keep it there. You can follow more of Abellanas’ work  for his brand Lebrel via Instagram and Facebook, and the video below (in Spanish) offers a closer look. (via FastCo)

 

 



Art

Densely Textured Murals Reminiscent of Topographical Maps by ‘Klone’

August 21, 2017

Christopher Jobson

As part of an ongoing body of work titled Personal Topography, artist Klone has painted murals around the world in this distinct, striped style. The paintings of creatures and people are meant as a visual metaphor for the ways in which personalities and inner identities differ. “The series explores both the way each [person] and other creatures have their own topography, represented by the topographical lines,” Klone shares with Colossal. “The simplicity of colour limitations provides the idea in a direct approach and there is a constant attempt to work with the surface and not necessarily make it disappear, so the wall stays a wall and a building is still the building.”

The works seen here went up in Canada, the United States, Poland, Norway, Ukraine and Israel over the last year. Klone was born in Ukraine and now lives and works in Tel Aviv. You can see more of his work on his website and on Instagram.

 

 



Sponsor

For Winsor & Newton’s Professional Acrylic Paints, Consistency is Key (Sponsor)

August 21, 2017

Colossal

In order to have free reign over your creative ideas, access to consistent tools and materials is essential. Winsor & Newton have taken the guesswork out with their Professional Acrylic paint range: rigorous laboratory testing ensures optimum performance each and every time you uncap a tube.

And now you can see, behind the scenes, how this analysis works. Newly released videos from Winsor & Newton’s London lab document the carefully calibrated process that helps to deliver impeccable paint with every brushstroke. These trials are central to Winsor & Newton’s innovative approach, and are the final step in a process of research and development that yields the brand’s premium products.

‘Color Men’, the lab’s set of expert chemists, work closely with in-house artists on research and development, and are dedicated to testing Winsor & Newton’s products again and again. They’re responsible for ensuring absolute consistency in Professional Acrylic paints.

As a starting point, the Color Men test each Winsor & Newton paint’s opacity levels by examining the degree to which light can pass through it. This test uses a carefully calibrated machine that was built expressly for the process. Color is pulled over special high-contrast cards using an applicator bar, and, once dry, the opacity is measured to ensure perfect levels of coverage over both black and white backgrounds.

Winsor & Newton isn’t just accounting for results: they meticulously monitor the viscosity of their Professional Acrylic to ensure a consistency that’s buttery, reliable, and easy to work with. The Color Men measure viscosity and texture through resistance, by using a viscometer spindle stirred within the paint at a predetermined speed.

As a final measure of engineering perfection, Winsor & Newton ensure the right balance of materials in their Professional Acrylic paint by testing specific gravity—adhering to strict specifications on the volume of each ingredient. The result? Perfect paint, every time.

Learn more about Winsor & Newton’s testing process and Professional Acrylic Paints at winsornewton.com/na/professional-acrylic-paint.
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Art Illustration

Drawing With Shadows: Illustrator Guy Larsen Creates Portraits From the Shadows of Crumpled Paper

August 21, 2017

Christopher Jobson

In this brief video, London-based illustrator Guy Larsen finds inspiration in the shadow lines cast by a crumpled up ball of paper which he uses to draw a variety of distorted portraits. Being a talented artist makes this look easy, but it’s probably a fun exercise for anyone who wants to practice seeing things differently or to force a different illustration style. You can see more of Larsen’s work on Instagram and in his online shop. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art

Origami Animals Bound Across Walls in Murals by ‘Annatomix’ 

August 18, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Annatomix, a self-taught painter from Birmingham UK, creates geometric, origami-inspired animals on everyday materials of all sizes. Bumblebees and rabbits take shape on small surfaces like discarded paper bags and wood scraps, while foxes and peregrine falcons scale the sides of buildings. Crafted in acrylic and spray paint, pastels, graphite, and ink, her animal renderings balance a fantastical element while also responding to the environment they are painted into.

The artist’s lifelong interest in science, history, religion and philosophy have lead to her current body of work, which is “centered on nature of science and its connection with spirituality. I am using sacred geometry as the starting point to explore a broad range of themes that include; the creation of the universe,  evolution and extinction, repetition and cycles in history, the illusion of reality,” as she describes on her website.

Annatomix’s newest murals will go up this week in Sweden as a part of the street art Artscape Festival and you can see recent in-progress and finished work on her Instagram. Many of her smaller pieces are also for sale on her website.