Irving Harper: Works in Paper 

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Irving Harper: Works In Paper is a new book from Skira Rizzoli that collects the paper works of industrial designer Irving Harper. Harper worked as the director of design at George Nelson Associates during the 1960s and is known for designing the Marshmallow Sofa for Herman Miller (as well as the firms’ iconic logo) and the ball and sunburst clocks for Howard Miller. Privately the designer was also an artist and created numerous paper sculptures depicting animals, masks, and other figures. Via Rizzoli:

Encompassing influences as diverse as Picasso, Egyptian hieroglyphs, the art of Oceana and Africa, the architecture of Paris, and the American beech tree that shades the Rye, New York home he has lived in for over 50 years, the artist’s private meditations reveal an informed aesthetic consciousness expressing itself as pure joy. Harper’s private work delivers on the promise of modernism: humble materials elevated by brilliant design and craftsmanship, and integrating the natural world to create objects in a universally understood language.

You can pick up the book on Amazon or directly from Rizzoli. All images courtesy Skira Rizzoli. (via grain edit)

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Tree Spirit Carvings by Keith Jennings 

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Starting with a few hand tools in his own backyard, sculptor Keith Jennings began carving faces into trees in 1982, a project he now refers to as Tree Spirits. It wasn’t long before he was commissioned to do a series of the carvings on some 20 trees around St. Simons Island just off the coast of Georgia. You can read and see more over on My Modern Met.

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Art Class Advertising Reinvented: A Stop Motion Video Using Stills Taken from a Life Drawing Course 

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How do you advertise a life drawing course? You could photocopy posters from the last session for the umpteenth time and hang them on a wall, or maybe take out a tiny ad in the local paper and hope some people show up. Except that’s what we’ve been doing for decades. Creative duo Wriggles & Robbins decided to take a new approach in this brief clip advertising drawing courses at The Book Club in London. Using photographed stills of the students’ work-in-progress the team created this lovely stop motion video the that does an extraordinary job of capturing the energy, perspective and fun of a life-drawing class. Really cool, I wish it went on for another minute or so. (via it’s nice that)

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New Underwater Reefs and Landscapes Made of Paper by Amy Eisenfeld Genser 

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Connecticut-based artist Amy Eisenfeld Genser (previously) recently completed a new series of coral reefs that she painstakingly recreates using rolled bits of paper and acrylic paint. Ahead of her upcoming exhibition at the Architectural Digest Home Show, Genser sat down with All Things Paper for a brief interview. An excerpt on her process:

These days I usually work with Thai Unryu [mulberry paper], but I have hundreds of papers in my studio from all around the world. I treat the paper almost as a pigment, layering colors one on top of the other to create different colors. My pieces are about a foot wide. Then I roll one layer on top of the other in all different thicknesses. I seal the roll with acid-free, archival glue stick, and then cut the long piece into sections with scissors or pruning shears. I have pruning shears of all different sizes to accommodate different widths.

See and learn more over on All Things Paper.

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Light Sculptures by Diet Wiegman 

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Approach a sculpture by artist Diet Wiegman and you might be left scratching your head at this random assembly of trash and objects, but shine a light on this same pile of detritus and suddenly a perfectly formed shadow appears: the unmistakable form of Michael Jackson, Michelangelo’s David or even a faithful recreation of the Earth’s surface as it reflects off a metal tray. In no way limited to shadows, the the artists career which spans nearly 50 years (most of what you see above was created in the 1980s) has also involved ceramics, paint, and photography. Two other accomplished artists, Tim Noble and Sue Webster, have also created similar shadow sculptures, though most of these works by Wiegman appear to pre-date them a bit. You can see 38 light sculptures on his blog and read a bit more over on Alafoto. (via ignant)

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Long Exposure Tree Landscapes by Pierre Pellegrini 

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Swiss photographer Pierre Pellegrini shoots some phenomenal long-exposure photographs of trees. The strong perspective and foggy atmosphere seemingly ever-present in his work creates images that are both beautiful and eerie. You can see hundreds more of his images over on Art Limited and on his personal website.

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