The Mini Book of Major Events by Evan Lorenzen 

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Trying to compress the history of Earth into a single book is an especially daunting task, the difficulty is compounded when the book you’re writing is the size of a nickel and is limited to just a few pages. Oh, and it needs lots of pictures. Lucky for us, illustrator Evan Lorenzen was up to the task and identified a few pivitol moments in history which he turned into this extremely tiny hand-bound book. You can see more of his miniature books over on his Tumblr. (via F*ck Yeah Book Arts)

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The Subtractive Canvases and Street Art of Pejac 

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Equally versatile in medium, canvas, and subject matter, Spanish artist Pejac seems comfortable working on the smallest drawing to the largest outdoor mural. While his ideas and motivations are often crystal clear, it is his minimalism and subtractive techniques that make his work truly stand out. His figures are often rendered only in silhouette or fine lines and familiar patterns like bricks or the folds of the human brain are transformed into flocks of birds or the branches of trees.

You can see much more of his work on Facebook and learn a bit more over on Arrested Motion.

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Fantastic Fungi: The Startling Visual Diversity of Mushrooms Photographed by Steve Axford 

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Marasmius haematocephalus

To think any one of these lifeforms exists in our galaxy, let alone on our planet, simply boggles the mind. Photographer Steve Axford lives and works in the Northern Rivers area of New South Wales in Australia where he spends his time documenting the living world around him, often traveling to remote locations to seek out rare animals, plants, and even people. But it’s his work tracking down some of the world’s strangest and brilliantly diverse mushrooms and other fungi that has resulted in an audience of online followers who stalk his work on Flickr and SmugMug to see what he’s captured next.

Axford shares via email that most of the mushrooms seen here were photographed around his home and are sub-tropical fungi, but many were also taken in Victoria and Tasmania and are classified as temperate fungi. The temperate fungi are well-known and documented, but the tropical species are much less known and some may have never been photographed before. Mushrooms like the Hairy Mycena and the blue leratiomyces have most likely never been found on the Australian mainland before, and have certainly never been photographed in an artistic way as you’re seeing here.

It was painfully difficult not to include more of Axford’s photography here, so I urge you to explore further. All photos courtesy the photographer. (via Awkward Situationist)

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Panus fasciatus

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Leratiomyces sp. / Found in Booyong Reserve, Booyong, NSW

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Mycena chlorophos

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Cyptotrama aspratum or Gold tuft

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Schizophyllum commune

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Hairy mycena

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White Mycena

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Mauve splitting waxcap

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Marasmius sp. / Marasmius haematocephalus

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panus lecomtei

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OLED Dandelion Lights by Takao Inoue 

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These beautiful lights were designed by cinematographer Takao Inoue as part of a small exhibition on display at Milano Salone earlier this year. The lights are made from real dandelions that have been suspended inside an acrylic block with a miniature OLED light embedded within the stem. The TAMPOPO OLED (tampopo is Japanese for dandelion) is now available through Tokyo Somewhere. You can read more on Spoon & Tamago and catch a brief interview with the designer on Lost at E Minor. (via Spoon & Tamago)

Update: Oh, and here’s a video.

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Calamityware: Disastrous Scenarios on Traditional Blue Porcelain Dinner Plates 

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For centuries artisans have been crafting white porcelain dishes and decorating them with intricate cobalt blue patterns, from floral designs to swirling landscapes. Enter graphic designer Don Moyer who is turning the tradition on its head with his wildly successful line of Calamityware dinner plates. Moyer expertly mimics several Eastern motifs in his plates with one major addition: flying monkeys, a UFO assault, and giant gurgling sea monsters.

Two plates have already been created and are available in his shop, while a third is currently doing quite well over on Kickstarter. He says next up is a bonafide pirate invasion plate which you can keep an eye out for (ba dum!) later this year.

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