An 80-Ton Bird’s Nest Built at the Clemson University Botanical Gardens

The Clemson Clay Nest was a public land art installation by Bavarian artist Nils-Udo that was constructed in the botanical gardens at Clemson University in South Carolina in 2005. The nest was built with the assistance of numerous students and other volunteers using 80 tons of pine logs harvested from the local Oconee County pine plantation and hundreds of bamboo stocks that were carefully organized into a circular structure dug in gardens rich red clay. After two years the piece was eventually dismantled and the mulched trees were used to partially fill the large hole. You can see many more of the work in these photos by Dylan Wolfe.

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Time-lapse Portraits Layered and Cut to Reveal the Passage of Time

For over a year I’ve been stalking the website of book and paper artist Ryuta Iida hoping to share new work with you and today I finally have something to show for it. As part of an ongoing collaboration with artist Yoshihisa Tanaka called Nerhol the duo are showing 27 new works at limArt this month including these astounding new portraits that are part of a series called Misunderstanding Focus. At first glance it looks as though a photograph has been printed numerous times, layered and cut into a sort of sculptural topography, which would indeed be amazing enough, but Nerhol took things a bit further. The numerous portraits are actually different, photographed over a period of three minutes as the subject tried to sit motionless, the idea being that it’s impossible to ever truly be still as our center of gravity shifts and our muscles are tense. The portraits are actually a layered lime-lapse representing several minutes in the subjects life and then cut like an onion to show slices of time, similar to the trunk of a tree. What a brilliant idea. If you’ve never seen Iida’s cut paper books, definitely head over to Nerhol to see them up close. A huge thanks to my friend Johnny at Spoon & Tamago for helping me translate some of this! (via upon a fold)

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Flickr Finds No. 17: Fun with Automobiles


Jan Cieslikiewicz


Patrick Joust


tipper *


Ethel Lilje


Mark Massey


Josephy Holmes


Joel Robison


artofthestate, sculpture by Lorenzo Quinn

As I was putting this post together I realized the vast majority of the photos contained cars in one way or another and decided to slap a theme on it, so here’s your bi-weekly dose of random photography seen on Flickr. See previous Flickr Finds.

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Anatomical Neon: Blown Glass Human Organs Containing Neon Lights by Jessica Lloyd-Jones

Anatomical Neon is a series of blown glass lights by North Wales-based artist Jessica Lloyd-Jones meant to focus attention on how energy is used by the human body. Describing the four pieces via her website she says:

Brain Wave conveys neurological processing activity as a kinetic and sensory, physical phenomena through its display of moving electric plasma. Optic Nerve shows a similar effect, more akin to the blood vessels of the eye and with a front ‘lens’ magnifying the movement and the intensity of light. Heart is a representation of the human heart illuminated by still red neon gas. Electric Lungs is a more technically intricate structure with xenon gas spreading through its passage ways, communicating our human unawareness of the trace gases we inhale in our breathable atmosphere.

The pieces were funded in part by awards from Arts Council Wales and Wales Arts International and executed at Urban Glass in New York in 2010. (via pinterest)

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A Skull of Books

I just spotted this new work-in-progress by one of my favorite artists Maskull Lasserre (previously). Incarnate (Three Degrees of Certainty II) is nearly perfect rendering of a human skull from a thick stack of outdated computer manuals. Looking at these particular titles I can’t help but think these books have been called to a much higher purpose.

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Suspended Bouncy Ball Installation by Nike Savvas

Atomic: Full of Love, Full of Wonder was a 2005 installation by artist Nike Savvas at the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art in Melbourne. The piece involved an immense array of suspended bouncy balls creating a dense field of color in the gallery space that was gently moved in waves by a nearby fan. How fun would it have been to walk through this? Savvas most recently exhibited a series of complex geometric thread installations at Breenspace. (via job’s wife)

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Origami Stop Motion Videos by Sipho Mabona

I’m really enjoying this pair of perfectly executed stop motion videos shot by animation studio stoptrick featuring the origami work of Sipho Mabona. Mabona also just completed a fun origami installation for the Japanese American National Museum in L.A. featuring a swarm of locusts folded from uncut sheets of U.S. currency. (via laughing squid)

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