Temporary Light Etchings on the Streets of Copenhagen by Asbjørn Skou

Artist Asbjørn Skou lives and works in Copenhagen where he creates all matter of prints, drawings, and occasionally public light installations. The images above are from a 2010 series called Markeringer where the artist projected a collection etchings at the Sjaeloer railway station. To me it looks almost as is the drawings have been etched into the building’s surface causing the light from the inside to creep through. See much more from this installation here. (via ruines humaines)

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Glittering Metallic Ink Clouds Photographed by Albert Seveso

I am completely unable to resist posting new work from photographer Albert Seveso (previously here, here and even here), and this continuation of his experimental underwater ink photography is no exception. For this new series, Il Mattino ha l’oro in bocca, Seveso uses accents of metallic inks to accentuate the rolling plumes of color as they disperse underwater. All photos courtesy the artist.

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Nihilistic Optimistic: New Shadow Sculptures Built from Discarded Wood from Tim Noble and Sue Webster

Earlier this week London-based duo Tim Noble and Sue Webster opened their first solo show since 2006 at Blain|Southern in London. Titled Nihilistic Optimistic, the exhibition includes six large-scale sculptures built from what appear to be haphazard clumps of discarded wood but when illuminated by a light projector create uncannily accurate self-portraits of the artists. Via their artist statment:

Tim Noble and Sue Webster take ordinary things including rubbish, to make assemblages and then point light to create projected shadows which show a great likeness to something identifiable including self-portraits. The art of projection is emblematic of transformative art. The process of transformation, from discarded waste, scrap metal or even taxidermy creatures to a recognizable image, echoes the idea of ‘perceptual psychology’ a form of evaluation used for psychological patients. Noble and Webster are familiar with this process and how people evaluate abstract forms. Throughout their careers they have played with the idea of how humans perceive abstract images and define them with meaning. The result is surprising and powerful as it redefines how abstract forms can transform into figurative ones.

If you’re in London the next few weeks I think this is a must-see, if not here are some more installation views. The show runs through November 24.

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Miniature Worlds Digitally Assembled from Hundreds of Photographs by Catherine Nelson

Sydney-based artist Catherine Nelson refers to herself as a painter with a camera, in that she doesn’t see the world as a photographer does but instead uses photos as a medium with which she creates these fantastic miniature worlds. Each work is comprised of hundreds of photographs which she digitally stitches together, drawing from an extensive background in visual special effects having worked on such films as Moulin Rouge, Harry Potter and 300. Of her work Nelson says:

When I embraced the medium of photography, I felt that taking a picture that represented only what was within the frame of the lens wasn’t expressing my personal and inner experience of the world around me. With the eye and training of a painter and with years of experience behind me in film visual effects, I began to take my photos to another level. The ‘Future Memories’ series comprises of 20 floating worlds, meticulously composed with thousands of assembled details. Visual poetry, nature photography and digital techniques blend together to give shape to these transcendental landscapes. The result is a contemporary pictorial mythology that subtly reminds the viewer of a profound truth: that it is in the flourishing variety of the local that the fate of the world resides.

Although the pieces are quite gorgeous to look at right here on Colossal, it’s hard to convey the resolution and scale of each piece which measures about 40×40″ (100x100cm), a level of detail that requires Nelson to spend nearly a month on each piece. It was my assumption based on the perspective and detail that some of these works must be somehow partially rendered in 3D, however she assured me via email that this is not the case. Though she uses digital editing to assemble them, they are almost purely based in photography. Incredible.

Nelson had several pieces on display earlier this month at fotofever in Brussels and will have work later this year at Gallery NOW in Seoul and at CONTEXT in Miami. You can see much more of her work at Galerie Paris-Beijing.

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Stunning Photographs of Antony Gormley’s ‘Another Place’ by Paul Sutton

Another Place is a collection of 100 cast iron figurative sculptures by artist Antony Gormley that was installed at Crosby Beach, England in the mid-2000s. The giant figures each weigh upward of 1,400 lbs (650 kg) and are spread across an area of beach nearly two miles long. Photographer Paul Sutton has spent the last few months capturing these wonderful images of the works, many more of which you can see over on his 500px page.

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Anne Lindberg Creates A Cloud of Cotton Thread at Carrie Secrist Gallery

A few days ago I stopped by Carrie Secrist Gallery here in Chicago to discover a new thread installation from Kansas City-based artist Anne Lindberg (previously) called Zip Drawing. The piece was created by stapling taunt strands of Egyptian cotton thread in a meticulous yet seemingly haphazard fashion between opposing gallery walls resulting in an ethereal field of suspended color. Although these photos by Derek Porter do a great job of conveying the hue and scale of the piece (35 feet at its widest) it’s hard to feel the magnitude and energy of the piece without standing right in front of it. Stop by if you can, the exhibition runs through October 20 and also includes a number of her colored pencil drawings.

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Black & White in Color: Visual Trickery from Eran Amir

I’ll let this fun video from filmmaker Eran Amir speak for itself, suffice to say the entire thing was shot as you see here without any color correction, and here’s a making of to show how he did it. Amir previously shot a music video using 1,500 photographs held by 500 people around Israel.

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