Guerilla Creative Collective ‘Kut’ Brings Unexpected Weather to the Streets of Riga

A Latvian group that goes by the name Kut who describes themselves as “a creative collective consisting of filmmakers, musicians, artists, politicians and cats,” recently undertook an action on the streets of Riga called “Oh Joy!” where the group brought nature to the city and made the weather change unexpectedly. Aside from the few “Oh dear god what is this stuff all over me” moments, it looks like most people enjoyed it quite a bit. Love the editing. (via vimeo)

Colored Thread Installations by Gabriel Dawe

Dallas-based artist Gabriel Dawe (previously here and here) creates colorful site-specific installations using bright gradients of suspended thread. Above is a small selection of his work over the past year as part of his Plexus series. Despite the geometric precision in each installation, it’s fascinating to see how some works become sort of amorphous clouds of floating color, and I’m sure seeing these on a computer screen hardly compares to seeing them up close. See much more on his website.

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Artists Take a Ride on a 4-Story Goldfinch Painted on an Abandoned Building in Naples

Graffiti & Street Art reports this giant goldfinch (“The Goldfinch of Scampia”) was painted on the side of a troubled building in Naples in 2009 by German artists Simon Jung and Paul & Hanno Schweizer. Afterward the three perched on the building’s ledge for this great shot. (via graffiti & street art)

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Illustrator Mark Crilley Shreads a Playing Card and Draws a Photo Realistic Copy

Michigan-based author and illustrator Mark Crilley has been working on a series of “realism challenges” on his YouTube channel. In his third installment he tackled the realistic drawing of a torn playing card. Pretty incredible. (via boing boing, thnx brian!)

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Black Cloud: Carlos Amorales Adorns Gallery Walls with Thousands of Black Paper Moths


Black Cloud, 2009, Espacio AV


Black Cloud, 2009, Espacio AV


Black Cloud, 2009, Espacio AV


Black Cloud, 2009, Espacio AV


Black Cloud, 2007, Yvon Lambert Gallery


Black Cloud, 2007, Yvon Lambert Gallery


Black Cloud, 2007, Yvon Lambert Gallery


Black Cloud, 2007, Yvon Lambert Gallery


Black Cloud, 2007, Yvon Lambert Gallery


Black Cloud, 2007, Yvon Lambert Gallery

Black Cloud is an installation by Mexican artist Carlos Amorales involving tens of thousands of black paper months affixed to the walls of large interior spaces. The piece was first installed at Yvon Lambert in 2007 and then in a different configuration at an old baroque church in Spain that was converted to a multi-use space called Espacio AV in 2009. Gorgeous. See much more here. (via feul)

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Unusual Long Exposure Firework Photographs by David Johnson

While attending the International Fireworks Show in Ottawa, Canada earlier this month photographer David Johnson had his camera in hand to document the night. When Spain’s entry into the competition begin he decided to try something a little different resulting in the photos you see here which are unlike any long exposure firework shots I’ve ever seen. Via email David tells me how he accomplished the effect:

The technique I used was a simple refocus during the long exposure. Each shot was about a second long, sometimes two. I’d start out of focus, and when I heard the explosion I would quickly refocus, so the little stems on these deep sea creature lookalikes would grow into a fine point. The shapes are quite bizarre, some of them I was pleasantly surprised with.

What’s interesting is that unlike usual firework photos that seem to make long trails across the sky, Johnson’s photos look like flowers with little triangular plumes coming to a point. Pretty amazing. You can see several more photos here.

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New Interpolated HD Video of Curiosity Mars Rover Descent Depicts Real-Time Landing

I’ve seen several different videos of Curiosity’s descent down to the Mars, and while incredible because of what they depict, none approached the frame-rate we might normally expect from an actual film. Using footage provided by NASA, Reddit user Godd2 just spent the last four days on behalf of all humankind creating a stunning interpolated HD version of the descent. In layman’s terms interpolation involves taking a choppy video, in this case NASA’s 4 frames-per-second video, and rendering the “missing” frames in between resulting in an incredibly smooth 25 frames-per-second video. This is, I believe, the closest approximation ever of what it might feel like to land on another planet in real time using actual footage. Amazing. Here it is on YouTube.

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