The Sketchbook Project Publishes a Printed Glimpse Into Their Global Sketchbook Community

May 5, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

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The Sketchbook Project began in 2006 by co-founders Steven Peterman and Shane Zucker as a way to disseminate hands-on art making via the virtual world. Since its inception in Atlanta, GA and move to New York City in 2009, the project has grown into a massive crowd-sourced library that features 33,724 sketchbooks from over 135 countries. This extensive collection can be viewed in person at the project’s exhibition space at the Brooklyn Art Library, online in their digital archive, and at pop-ups around the country in their mobile library.

Now entering the project’s ninth year, the co-founders have published a compendium of their collection of sketches from around the globe titled The Sketchbook Project World Tour. Peterman and Zucker believed it would be unfair for the book to represent the entirety of the project, and rather aim for the publication to serve as a glimpse into the community they have supported for nearly a decade. “Sketchbooks over the years have served as shared memoirs to cancer survivors, inspired some to return to art school, and have been a daily practice to re-inspire the dormant or budding artists. You will read accounts by people you have never met,” they explain in the book’s introduction.

The book’s foreword is written by our very own, Christopher Jobson, who in 2012 had the opportunity to curate a selection of sketchbooks for The Sketchbook Project’s first national Mobile Library tour. The book, printed by Princeton Architectural Press, is available today in the Colossal Shop.
Update: The Sketchbook Project World Tour book is now available in the Colossal Shop.

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Handmade Kraft Paper Animations by Nancy Liang

May 4, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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From time to time we love to stop and marvel at the mathematical wizardry of artists and designers who make GIFs with code, but Sydney-based illustrator Nancy Liang takes an old-school approach with her imaginative scenes made almost entirely by hand. There isn’t a single element in her animations that doesn’t begin as a physical drawing or object. Liang works mostly with kraft paper cutouts and pencil drawings, all of which is carefully planned in copious sketches before each element is scanned and animated in Photoshop. Seen here are a few of her most recent pieces, you can see more on her Tumblr: Over the Moon.

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Hyperrealistic Cactus Paintings that Bristle with Detail by Lee Kwang-ho

May 4, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Cactus No.69, 2011, Oil on canvas, 162.1×130.3cm, courtesy Johyun Gallery

With deftly applied strokes of paint scarcely wider than a hair, Korean painter Lee Kwang-ho creates towering renderings of cacti that bristle with thorns and tangled branches. The colorful oil paintings can reach up to 8 feet tall, an imposing scale with ample room for tediously composed details that push each work into the realm of hyperrealism. You can explore more of Kwang-ho ‘s work at Artsy and Atelier Aki. (via Juxtapoz, Hi-Fructose, Beautiful/Decay)

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Cactus No.51,2010,Oil on Canvas,194x200cm, courtesy Johyun Gallery

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Cactus No.59, oil on canvas, 259.1x170cm, 2011, courtesy Johyun Gallery

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Cactus No.73, oil on canvas 193.9×130.3cm 2011, courtesy Atelier Aki

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Cactus No.59, oil on canvas, 259.1x170cm, 2011, courtesy Johyun Gallery

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Cactus No.35, oil on canvas 162x130cm 2009, courtesy Atelier Aki

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Cactus No.35, detail

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“Touch” Exhibition at Joyhun Gallery, 2011

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“Touch” Exhibition at Joyhun Gallery, 2011

 

 



Double Exposure Animal Portraits by Andreas Lie

May 4, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Norwegian visual artist Andreas Lie merges verdant landscapes and photographs of animals to creates subtle double exposure portraits. Snowy mountain peaks and thick forests become the shaggy fur of wolves and foxes, and even the northern lights appear through the silhouette of a polar bear. Lie is undoubtedly influenced by his surroundings in Bergen, Norway, a coastal city surrounded by seven mountains. Many of these are available as prints and other objects on Society6. (via Beautiful/Decay, Blu)

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Simon Stålenhag’s Retro Sci-Fi Images of a Dystopian Swedish Countryside Published In Two New Books

May 1, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Across the backdrop of an expansive retro-Scandinavian landscape, Swedish illustrator Simon Stålenhag has spent the last few years imagining a world of science fiction inhabited by roaming mech robots, dinosaurs, and other technological innovations plopped right onto the Swedish countryside. The digitally painted images spread far and wide across the internet over the last few years, capturing the imagination of legions of fantasy and sci-fi fans who clamoured for comic books and even a feature film. For now, we’ll have to make do with old-fashioned art books.

Stålenhag and Free League Publishing just announced a Kickstarter project for two new books featuring Stålenhag’s dystopian vision of the future that will pair illustrations with short stories written in English. You can explore many more illustrations on his website (just start scrolling), and some are available as individual prints.

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Fascinating Satellite Photos of Seaweed Farms in South Korea

April 30, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center just shared these fascinating satellite photos taken in January 2014 over the shallow waters around Sisan Island, South Korea. The tiny patchwork of small squares are entire fields of seaweed that are held in place with ropes and buoys to keep the plants near the surface during high tide but off the seafloor in low tide. Via NASA Earth Observatory:

Since 1970, farmed seaweed production has increased by approximately 8 percent per year. Today, about 90 percent of all the seaweed that humans consume globally is farmed. That may be good for the environment. In comparison to other types of food production, seaweed farming has a light environmental footprint because it does not require fresh water or fertilizer.

You can see much more of what’s happening at NASA lately by following the Goddard Space Flight Center on Flickr.

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Urban Jewelry: New Lace Street Art by NeSpoon

April 30, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Since we last learned about NeSpoon last year, the Polish street artist has popped up everywhere with new pieces in Perth, Tunisia, Portugal, and elsewhere. NeSpoon translates traditional lace patterns into large-scale murals or stencils, ceramic installations, and even embroidery. The artworks are part of her ongoing series of “public jewelry” that seeks to turn unadorned spaces and surfaces into something beautiful. You can see more over on Behance.

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