Figurative Sculptures Welded from Steel Scraps by Jordi Diez Fernandez 

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Monument a Ildefons Cerda

8- Ildefonso CerdÖ II.
Monument a Ildefons Cerda

10- Ildefonso CerdÖ. Detalle.
Monument a Ildefons Cerda

11- Ildefonso CerdÖ. Espalda
Monument a Ildefons Cerda

12- Ildefonso CerdÖ. Perfil.
Monument a Ildefons Cerda

13-Ildefons CerdÖ. Vista noct.
Monument a Ildefons Cerda

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Amantes de Acero

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Age Quod Agis

32- El Umbral.
El Umbral

34- El Umbral.
El Umbral

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Barcelona-based sculptor Jordi Diez Fernandez works pimarily with welded steel fragments to create monumental human forms. His most recent piece is a tribute to civil engineer Ildefons Cerdà (top) who was largely responsible for designing the 19th-century extension of Barcelona called the Eixample, a memorial now on view in the municipality of Centelles. You can see much more of Fernandez’s work on his website and over on Behance.

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Old Technology Making Music: ‘Eye of the Tiger’ on a Dot Matrix Printer and ‘Tainted Love’ Played on Hard Drives 

I’m such a sucker for these clips of outmoded technology making music. In the first video by MIDIDesaster we listen as Eye of the Tiger by Survivor is played on a dot matrix printer. In the second video by Gigawipf, a box of hard drives plays ‘Tainted Love’ by Soft Cell. Gigawipf has dozens of other songs recorded with hard drives you can listen to here, and if you liked these you should also check out Polybius, and still my all-time favorite House of the Rising Sun which I managed to turn into a ringtone because I’m like that. (via Laughing Squid)

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Life and Death Animated through the Four Seasons in New Music Video for Chet Faker 

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In this superbly shot stop-motion music video for Chet Faker’s latest single Talk is Cheap, creative directors Toby and Pete create a striking visual of the four seasons. It gets a tad macabre at the end, but it’s still beautifully executed. If you liked this, check out Emma Allen’s makeup stop-motion short Ruby.

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Artist Aganetha Dyck Collaborates with Bees to Create Sculptures Wrapped in Honeycomb 

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Photo by William Eakin

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Photos by William Eakin

In North America, Europe and many other parts of the world, bee populations have plummeted 30-50% due to colony collapse disorder, a fact not lost on artist Aganetha Dyck who for years has been working with the industrious insects to create delicate sculptures using porcelain figurines, shoes, sports equipment, and other objects left in specially designed apiaries. As the weeks and months pass the ordinary objects are slowly transformed with the bees’ wax honeycomb. It’s almost impossible to look at final pieces without smiling in wonder, imagining the unwitting bees toiling away on a piece of art. And yet it’s our own ignorance of humanity’s connection to bees and nature that Dyck calls into question, two completely different life forms whose fate is inextricably intertwined.

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Born in Manitoba in 1937, the Canadian artist has long been interested in inter-species communication and her research has closely examined the the ramifications of honeybees disappearing from Earth. Working with the insects results in completely unexpected forms which can be surprising and even humorous. “They remind us that we and our constructions are temporary in relation to the lifespan of earth and the processes of nature,” comments curator Cathi Charles Wherry. “This raises ideas about our shared vulnerability, while at the same time elevating the ordinariness of our humanity.”

If you want to learn more I suggest watching the video above from the Confederation Centre of the Arts, and if you want to see her work up close Dyck opens an exhibition titled Honeybee Alterations at the Ottawa School of Art on March 3, 2014. A huge thanks to Gibson Gallery as well as Aganetha and Deborah Dyck for their help. All photos courtesy Peter Dyck and William Eakin.

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Giant Suspended Net Installations by Janet Echelman 

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In the late 1990s artist Janet Echelman traveled to India as a Fulbright Scholar with the intention of giving painting exhibitions around the country. She shipped her painting supplies ahead of time and landed in the fishing village of Mahabalipuram to begin her exhibitions with one major hitch: the painting supplies never arrived. While walking through the village Echelman was struck by the quality and variety of nets used by the local fisherman and questioned what it might look like if such nets were hung and illuminated in the air. Could it be a new approach to sculpture? A new chapter in her artist career was born, and the artist has since dedicated her time and energy to creating these massive net sculptures in locations around the world.

Echelman is currently embarking on her largest piece ever, a 700-foot-long sculpture that will be suspended over Vancouver next month in conjunction with the 30th anniversary of the TED Conference. In collaboration with the Burrard Arts Foundation, she’s currently seeking funding via Kickstarter to make it happen. There’s all kinds of great prints, postcards, and shirts available so check it out.

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Giant Wind-Up Bots Overtake the Streets of Buenos Aires 

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In this latest clip from Fernando Livschitz of Black Sheep Films we watch as tin windup toys overtake the streets of Buenos Aires, living amongst its inhabitants as if it was an everyday occurrence. Livschitz is known for his short films that blend live action footage with aspects of absurdity, most notably his New York and Buenos Aires theme parks. Music by the very fine Canned Heat circa 1972.

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