Hand Drawn Rotoscoping Gifs and Other Animation Experiments by Matthias Brown 

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I recently stumbled onto the Tumblr of animator Matthias Brown who shares his numerous experiments with rotoscoping and other animation techniques in quick looped gifs. In case you’re unfamiliar, rotoscoping is method where animators trace real footage frame by frame to create live-action animations with a hand drawn feel, a technique invented in 1915 by Max Fleischer who used it in his series Out of the Inkwell. While the technique is a century old it’s oddly refreshing to see it appear in today’s barrage of animated gifs, gritty imperfections and all. You can see much more of Brown’s work over on his aptly titled site TraceLoops, and he talks a bit more about his process here.

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Ephemeral Rays: Hundreds of Suspended Light Bulbs in a UK Dockyard 

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Installed earlier this summer at the Chatham Historic Dockyard, Ephemeral Rays is a new work by artist Charlotte Smith. The piece consists of several hundred lights on filaments that fill a large window of a galvanizing shop. Of the work she shares:

Originally installed at Chatham Historic Dockyard, Ephemeral Rays depicted the volume of a fleeting ray of light beaming through a window of the Galvanising Shop. Reinstalled at Turner Contemporary the work evolved into a new form; drawing on the stunning expanse of sea and sky, the infinite horizon line was the focal point of the composition.

You can see much more over on her website. (via My Modern Met, Lustik)

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Artist Guy Laramée Carves a Mountainous Landscape from an Encyclopedia Britannica Set 

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In one of his most ambitious book sculptures to date artist Guy Laramée (previously here and here) created an homage to the printed Encyclopedia Britannica by transforming a 24-volume set into a sloping mountainous landscape. Titled Adieu, Laramée says the work was inspired in part by Encyclopedia Britannica’s announcement that after 244 years the would cease printing its iconic multi-volume book sets. The artist relied on his travels in Ecuador, Peru and Brazil to arrive at the final form carved into the book tops that gradually morphs from green mountains to grasslands and semi-desert prairies. Watch the video above by Sébastien Ventura to see the piece in detail, and you can also see more of Laramée’s recent work over at JHB Gallery.

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All You Can Feel: Images of Recreational Drugs Exposed to Film Negatives by Sarah Schoenfeld 

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Whether you’ve tried mind-altering substances or not one thing remains true: we all have an idea of what a drug feels like, be it imagined, anecdotal, or from direct exposure. So what might the effect of a drug look like? That was the question asked by artist Sarah Schoenfeld who had ample exposure to the realities of drugs while working in a Berlin nightclub. To answer the question she converted her photography studio into a laboratory and exposed legal and illegal liquid drug mixtures to film negatives. The resulting chemical reactions were then greatly magnified into large prints to form a body of work titled All You Can Feel.

These final, otherworldly images of heroin, cocaine, MDMA, and other substances explore a relationship between photography, alchemy, pharmacy and psychology. One can’t help but draw parallels between Schoenfeld’s photos and the perceived effects of various narcotics, be it the sharp, electrified ball of Ketamine or the cold, isolated sphere of LSD, while others look like unstable tectonic plates, a continent on the verge of destruction.

All You Can Feel is now available as a book through Kerber Press, and a collection of images were on view as part of a group show, It Is Only A State of Mind at Heidelberger Kunstverein in Heidelberg through February 2, 2014. You can also read an interview with Schoenfeld over on Kaltblut. If you liked this, also check out Vanishing Spirits by Ernie Button. (via It’s Nice That)

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Artist Paco Pomet Subverts Vintage Vacation Photos and Historical Landscapes in His Surreal Oil Paintings 

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Artist Paco Pomet who lives and works in Grenada, Spain possesses a wonderfully bizarre sense of humor that manifests itself in each of his oil paintings which contain a strange or humorous visual twist. His subverted landscapes and portraits often borrow from sepia-toned photographs that look like historical documents or vintage vacation photos. Pomet opens his second solo show, Scapelands, at Richard Heller Gallery on January 11, 2014.

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