Artist Hiroko Kubota Embroiders Popular Internet Cats on Shirts at the Request of Her Son 

cat-1

cat-2

cat-3

cat-4

cat-5

cat-6

Japanese embroidery artist Hiroko Kubota was in the process of making custom sized clothes for her smaller-framed son when he made a small request: could some of the shirts have cats on them? Kubota explains her son was somewhat obsessed with cats and had collected a small library of adorable images found around the web.

After making a few cat shirts the artist posted photos of the pieces online and unsurprisingly they quickly went viral, spurring Kubota to open an Etsy shop under the brand Go!Go!5 where she started selling the shirts at an impressive price tag of around $250-$300 apiece. But price was no object for internet cat fanatics and the shirts have been snapped up almost as quickly as Kubota embroiders them.

You can see many more shirts here. All photos courtesy the artist. (via Spoon & Tamago)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Idyllic Oceanside Landscapes Photographed by Andrew Smith 

cuba-1
Greece Santorini

cuba-5

cuba-2
Taupo, Waikato, NZ

cuba-7
New Zealand

cuba-3
Muriwai, Auckland, NZ

cuba-4

cuba-6

cuba-8
Motuoapa, Waikato, NZ

If I had to spend the rest of my life trapped inside a photograph, there’s a good chance I might flip through a stack of photographs by Andrew Smith (previously) to make a selection. Smith shoots mostly in locations around his home in New Zealand where he captures breathtaking oceanside landscapes both in and out of water. Smith photographs almost exclusively with a Nikon D800 and then processes his images in Adobe Lightroom, something he documents in detail on his Before and After Lightroom Blog. These are some of my favorite shots from the last year or so, but you can see hundreds of additional photos by Smith over on Flickr.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

Artist Tobias Gutmann Travels 25,000 Miles With the ‘Face-o-mat,’ A Portable Analog Portrait Booth 

face-3

face-1

face-w

face-4

face-5

Since late last year Swiss artist Tobias Gutmann has been traveling the world with his portable analog portrait booth dubbed the Face-o-mat. Customers take a seat in front of a small window, much like a photobooth, and then adjust some levers to determine how their portrait will look: color or black and white, natural or facelift, classical or avant-garde. Then, for a small fee, Gutmann works his illustration magic and creates a strange abstract portrait in less than three minutes.

In the last few months the Face-o-mat traveled some 25,000 miles (40,514km) with stops in Stockholm, Milan, Dar es Salaam, Tokyo and London. Gutmann often repaints the facade of the machine to match the local language, and recently rebuilt the entire machine using MDF (Medium-density fibreboard) to make it more durable. You can follow further Face-o-mat adventures on Facebook and you can see some of the over 700 poraits Gutmann has illustrated over on Tumblr. (via Think Faest!)

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Wonderland: A Fantastical Voyage of Remembrance Through Portrait Photography by Kirsty Mitchell 

Gaia, The Birth of an End
Gaia, The Birth of an End © Kirsty Mitchell

Part tribute, part conceptual photography, part exploration of costume and set design, Wonderland is an ongoing series of portraits by UK photographer Kirsty Mitchell. After the loss of her mother in 2008, Mitchell found herself in need of a creative outlet to grapple with the emptiness that often follows the death of a loved one. To fill the vacuum, Mitchell began to revisit fragments of fairy tales her mother would share with her as a child and decided to use them as a starting point for a series of elaborate portraits that would make use of her background in fashion design and costume making. The resulting images would form a storybook without words, a sort of visual narrative that people might project their own stories onto.

Everything you see in Mitchell’s photos from the costumes to the sets have been sewn, painted, glued, and assembled completely by hand, requiring up to five months of preparation. By the time of each photoshoot, which generally happens in the woodlands around her home, an elaborate scene has been constructed that the photographer says is akin to a miniature movie set, complete with lighting and assistants, let alone her absurdly patient models.

Gammelyn's Daughter
Gammelyn’s Daughter © Kirsty Mitchell

Gammelyn's Daughter a Waking Dream
Gammelyn's Daughter a Waking Dream © Kirsty Mitchell

The Ghost Swift
The Ghost Swift © Kirsty Mitchell

The Last Door of Autumn
The Last Door of Autumn © Kirsty Mitchell

The Guidance of Stray Souls
The Guidance of Stray Souls © Kirsty Mitchell

The Faraway Tree
The Faraway Tree © Kirsty Mitchell

The Storyteller
The Storyteller © Kirsty Mitchell

The Queen's Armada
The Queen’s Armada © Kirsty Mitchell

A Floral Birth
A Floral Birth © Kirsty Mitchell

Now five years later the Wonderland project has practically consumed Mitchell’s life. The photos, which total 69 pictures, have gone thoroughly viral around the web and have opened up entirely new avenues in her artistic career. Mitchell has just announced a collaboration with FX Media, who is helping to shoot a full-length documentary about the final 10 photos in the series, including a 5-minute behind-the-scenes clip detailing the preparation for each image, the first of which, Gaia, you can watch above. Mitchell also recently exhibited with Italian Vogue and was made Nikon UK’s Ambassador of Fine Art Photography in July of this year. You can learn more about her work via her website and get info on limited edition prints here.

Lastly, please do not use Mitchell’s Wonderland images on your billboard, t-shirt, coffee mug or shower curtain without her permission. Seriously. She’s an exceptionally kind person to speak with and will be thrilled to hear all about your amazing ideas for her work. All images above courtesy Kirsty Mitchell. (via PetaPixel)

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Evolution: A Stunning Monochromatic Exploration of Vertebrate Skeletons by Patrick Gries 

Horse and rider
Horse and Rider © Patrick Gries

Opah
Opah © Patrick Gries

Cheetah
Cheetah © Patrick Gries

African Elephant
African Elephant © Patrick Gries

gries-5
Rattlesnake © Patrick Gries

gries-6
Mandrill & Humbolt’s Wooly Monkey © Patrick Gries

Orca
Orca © Patrick Gries

gries-8
Lemur © Patrick Gries

gries-9
Flamingo & Water Monitor © Patrick Gries

gries-11
© Xavier Barral

gries-12
© Xavier Barral

Created in collaboration with the National Museum of Natural History in Paris, Evolution is an extraodinary collection of images by photographer Patrick Gries that tells the visual story of evolution through 300 black and white photos of vertebrate skeletons. Unlike a textbook approach to photography, the skeletons Gries’ photos appear to have been reanimated, artfully posed and lit in lifelike scenarios resulting in images that are both beautiful and haunting.

In addition to the National Museum of Natural History in Paris, Gries acquired anatomical specimens from numerous veterinary and natural history museums throughout France and Monaco to round out the series of photos that are accompanied by passages from writer and scientist Dr. Jean-Baptiste de Panafieu. Evolution is available through Editions Xavier Barral.

All images courtesy Patrick Gries. (via Photojojo)

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Pixel Pancho and Vhils Collaborate on the Streets of Lisbon 

vhils-1

vhils-2

vhils-3

Italian artist Pixel Pancho was recently invited by Underdogs to create a number of murals and other interventions in Lisbon, Portugal. One of my favorite pieces was this awesome collab with street artist Vhils (previously), known for his instantly recognizable “subtractive” style of etching imagery into walls. The steampunkish android holding a derelict boat was placed on a building next to the the Tagus river near where it empties into the Atlantic Ocean. Images courtesy Underdogs and Miguel Vinagre. (via StreetArtNews)

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Page 291 of 739«...290291292293...»