Voyage: A Fleet of 300 Illuminated Boats in Canary Wharf by Aether & Hemera 

Media architect Claudio Benghi and light artist Gloria Ronchi joined together in 2006 to form Aether & Hemera, an interdisciplinary collaboration that seeks “to research the aesthetic challenges of light and its power to trigger emotions and response, creating a sense of identity or setting a mood.” Their latest installation in London’s Canary Wharf is this beautiful fleet of 300 illuminated boats called Voyage. Each floating light is reminiscent of a paper-folded origami boat that is illuminated from within, and I’m told there is a wireless network in the vicinity that allows you to join with your mobile device and somehow alter the color of the entire installation.

Voyage will be up through February 15th, 2013, and while the lights are on during the day, the viewing is probably best at night. I want to thank photographers Sean Batten and Ian Docwra for providing the images for this post.

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Software Architect Turned Photographer Alexander Safonov Captures Breathtaking Underwater Scenes off the Coast of South Africa 

Alexander Safonov is a software architect from Voronezh, Russia who currently lives and works in Discovery Bay, Hong Kong. Not content to sit in front of a computer full-time he obtained a diving license in 2002 and started to experiment with underwater photography about two years later. He has since made numerous excursions to photograph underwater wildlife off Cocos Island, Fiji, the Galapagos and Raja Ampat. However his favorite destination is the annual sardine run off the coast of South Africa where most of the photos you see were captured over the last few years. You can see much more of his work on Flickr and 500px.

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Metropolis: A Giant New Window Drawing by Strook 

Risking life and limb atop a tall scaffold, Belgian street artist Strook (who you might remember from his mossy pressure-washed street art) just completed this impressive drawing titled Metropolis inspired by Fritz Lang’s 1927 film by the same name. The drawing was done entirely with white marker inside the Concertgebouw (concert building) in Bruges, Belgium but because of the changing light patterns during the day the piece looks as if was done in black when viewed opposite a light source. Watch the video to see the entire piece come together.

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Cranberry Bog Wakeboarding 

The annual harvesting of cranberries has to be one of the most genius methods of fruit farming there is. Every fall after the berries ripen on the vine, instead of being picked by people or machine the fields are flooded with water from a nearby reservoir. Because the berries are filled with air, all it takes is a gentle nudge from a special tractor to knock them loose and float them to the surface where they are quickly and easily collected by the tasty, tart kabillions.

Lucky for us a film crew over at Redbull asked the important question: “What would happen if you pulled a wakeboarder through the ocean of cranberries and filmed with high speed HD film?” This glorious video is the result. The team assures us that no cranberries were injured during production. (via devour)

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The Porcelain Sculptures of Kate McDowell 

In her delicate crafted porcelain sculptures conceptual artist Kate McDowell expresses her interpretation of the clash between the natural world and the modern-day environmental impact of industrialized society. The resulting works can be equal parts amusing and disturbing as the anatomical forms of humans and animals become inexplicably intertwined in her delicate porcelain forms. Via her artist statment:

In my work this romantic ideal of union with the natural world conflicts with our contemporary impact on the environment. These pieces are in part responses to environmental stressors including climate change, toxic pollution, and gm crops. They also borrow from myth, art history, figures of speech and other cultural touchstones. In some pieces aspects of the human figure stand-in for ourselves and act out sometimes harrowing, sometimes humorous transformations which illustrate our current relationship with the natural world. In others, animals take on anthropomorphic qualities when they are given safety equipment to attempt to protect them from man-made environmental threats.

Some of McDowell’s work is currently on display at the American Museum of Ceramic Art through January 26th, 2013 and you can see much more of her recent work in her online portfolio. If you liked this, also check out the work of Motohiko Odani. (via empty kingdom)

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New High Speed Liquid Splash Photographs by Markus Reugels 

I never tire of seeing German photographer Markus Reugels’ (previously here and here) continued experiments with water splashes. It’s immediately apparent when looking at some of these recent photos from the last few months that his lighting, color, and timing techniques have continued to evolve, as each image is more impossibly complex than the last. See much more of his recent work here.

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