Cut Paper Sculptures and Illustrations by Elsa Mora 

elsa-1

elsa-2

elsa-3

elsa-4

elsa-5

elsa-6

elsa-7

elsa-8

Multimedia artist Elsa Mora was born and raised in Cuba before moving to the U.S. in 2001. Mora now lives and works in Los Angeles where she creates beautiful cut paper sculptures, illustrations and other visual curiosities with nothing but paper and glue. A number of her original works are available in her shop and on Etsy. She’ll also have work at the upcoming About Paper exhibition at Couturier Gallery in L.A. starting December 7th. (via Lustik)

See related posts on Colossal about , .

A Rotating Disco Ball Pizza Oven by Lukas Galehr 

disco-1
Photo © Lukas Schaller

disco-2
Photo © Lukas Schaller

disco-3
Photo © Lukas Schaller

disco-4
Photo © Lukas Schaller

disco-5
Photo © Lukas Schaller

Designed by Austrian architect Lukas Galehr for the recently-opened ‘Disco Volante’ pizzeria in Vienna, this fully-functional pizza oven has been designed to look like a gigantic reflective disco ball. And yes, it even rotates. Via Madame Mohr:

According to the clients wish the restaurant should not only carry the atmosphere of a southern Italian pizzeria but also transport the lightness of the “Italo-Disco” era of the 1970s and 80s.

The heart of every pizzeria is the wood fired oven which in this case is a giant disco ball with a rotating mechanism. After the dough is run out the Pizzaioli start the engine and the oven begins to slowly turn with about 1 revolution per minute.

You can see many more photos here and over on iGnant. Photos by Lukas Schaller. (via Dezeen)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

Graffiti Artist Le Module de Zeer Transforms a Room at the Les Bains Night Club 

lesbains-1

lesbains-2

Back in April we took a peek inside the near complete transformation by fifty street artists of the Les Bains nightclub prior to its demolition. Included in that post was an image of an incomplete work by graffiti artist Le Module de Zeer. The sprawling organic work seems to split the room in two as various forms dominate the walls, ceiling and floor. Watch the video by Yann Rineau to see the piece come together through to completion.

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Orchid: Exploding High-Speed Paint Flowers by Fabian Oefner 

orchid-1

orchid-2

orchid-3

orchid-4

orchid-5

For his third and final investigation in his “Paint Action” series Swiss photographer Fabian Oefner (previously here and here) created a series of flower-inspired paint formations titled Orchid. To make the images Oefner poured numerous layers of paint with a top layer of either black or white onto which he dropped a colored sphere. The resulting splash forced the colored paint up and out of the top layer resulting in the crowning splashes of color you see here. While working on the project the Creator’s Project stopped by the photographer’s studio for a discussion about how he works.

See related posts on Colossal about .

Food Sculptures Made with Fruits and Vegetables by Dan Cretu 

dan-1

dan-2

dan-3

dan-4

dan-5

dan-6

dan-7

Romania-based photographer Dan Cretu creates all sorts of fun everyday objects like cameras, radios, and bicycles using cut fruit and vegetables. Cretu says the pieces aren’t digitally altered and that due to the organic nature of the medium, each piece has to be constructed and photographed in less than four hours. You can see much more over on Tumblr, and just launched an Etsy shop where you can get prints of his work.

See related posts on Colossal about .

This Programmable 6,000-Part Drawing Boy Automata is Arguably the First Computer and It Was Built 240 Years Ago 

boy-1
The Writer was built in the 1770s using 6,000 moving parts by Pierre Jaquet-Droz, his son Henri-Louis, and Jean-Frédéric Leschot

Designed in the late 1770s this incredible little robot called simply The Writer, was designed and built by Swiss-born watchmaker Pierre Jaquet-Droz with help from his son Henri-Louis, and Jean-Frédéric Leschot. Jaquet-Droz was one of the greatest automata designers to ever live and The Writer is considered his pièce de résistance. On the outside the device is deceptively simple. A small, barefoot boy perched at a wooden desk holding a quill, easily mistaken for a toy doll. But crammed inside is an engineering marvel: 6,000 custom made components work in concert to create a fully self-contained programmable writing machine that some consider to be the oldest example of a computer.

In my youth the “automata” of choice was either a Tomy Omnibot or a demonic Teddy Ruxpin, cheaply manufactured plastic robots, both which played cassette tapes and were destined to break within a few weeks (if you lost or broke the remote control to the Omnibot it was effectively useless). Not to suggest the machines above were mass-produced as children’s toys, but it’s amazing to think such incredibly crafted machines like the Writer and the Swan were built in the eighteenth century around the time of the American Revolutionary War, the age of James Cook, and the invention of the steam engine. (via Colossal Submissions)

In this clip from BBC Four’s documentary Mechanical Marvels: Clockwork Dreams hosted by Professor Simon Schaffer, we go behind the scenes to learn just how this remarkably complex 240-year-old device was designed and constructed. The entire clip is well worth a watch, in fact here’s another bit about Merlin’s gorgeous silver swan automata:

Update: Some also argue that the 2,100-year-old Antikythera mechanism used to calculate astronomical positions is a contender for the first analog computer. (thnx, Elliot)

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Page 304 of 747«...303304305306...»