Art History

Portraits of Women Painted on the Handles of Old Paint Brushes by Rebecca Szeto

June 23, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Misako Shirasu. 7″h x 3″w x .75″d · Oil on Carved Paintbrush · 2017.

Drawing inspiration from across centuries, mediums, and cultures, artist Rebecca Szeto (previously) identifies both anonymous and historically significant women to depict atop the carved handles of old used paint brushes. From the first woman to graduate with a degree in architecture from MIT to a Chibok schoolgirl kidnapped by Boko Haram in 2014, or an anonymous face lifted from a 17th century Baroque painting, each portrait presents the face of a woman who has come in and out of focus throughout history.

“I am interested in things that fall between the cracks of place and language,” says Szeto in her artist statement. “Rust, dead bees, beaten up paintbrushes and scrap materials from my immediate surroundings all become a starting point. Play and chance are integral parts of my process; they’re a way for me to detach from preconceived ideas about the materials so I can freely explore their inherent qualities and investigate their deeper implications.”

You can explore the individual stories of all the women featured in the works seen here on Szeto’s website, and she’ll have work on view at Root Division in San Francisco as part of an exhibition titled Bizarre Bizarre curated by Michael Arcega starting in July.

Musical Notation. 7.25″h x 2.5″w x .1″d · Oil, Plaster on Carved Paintbrush · 2016.

Marion Mahony. 8″h x 3″w x 1″d · Oil on Carved Paintbrush · 2015.

Angela Isadora Duncan. 6″h x 2″w x .5″d · Oil on Carved Paintbrush · 2015.

Chibok Girl: Salamatu Bulama Usman. 5.5″h x 3″w x .5″d · Oil on Carved Paintbrush · 2017.

Violet Jessep. 5.25″h x 2.5″w x .5″d · Oil on Carved Paintbrush · 2015.

Emilie du Chatelet (2 for Squared). 8″h x 4″w x .5″d · Oil on Carved Paintbrush · 2015.

Margaret Roper (1500). 7″h x 3.5″w x .5″d · Oil on Carved Paintbrush · 2015.

 

 



Art

New Paintings Which Combine Cubist and Realist Elements by ‘Belin’

June 22, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Spanish artist Miguel Ángel Belinchón or “Belin” (previously) has long practiced photorealistic murals. It was in 2016 however, that his work began to mutate with the adoption of a cubist style, elongating his subjects’ necks and segmenting their faces in ways that would make Picasso himself proud. Despite the distorted facial features, many of his new works feature recognizable subjects. Belin’s paintings honor some of his great inspirations, displaying the likenesses of painters such as Frida Kahlo, Keith Haring, and Dali, alongside famous subjects such as the Mona Lisa.

Belin’s current solo exhibition is named after his self-created style, Post Neo Cubism, which can be seen at Paris-based 24 Beaubourg through June 25, 2017. You can see more of Belin’s stylistic mash-ups on his website and Instagram. (via Juxtapoz and Arrested Motion)

 

 

 

 



Animation Art

Wildly Absurd Experimental Body Animations by Esteban Diacono

June 22, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Argentinian motion graphics designer Esteban Diacono spends most of his time producing slick digital treatments for corporate clients around the world from Fox to FX and the Discovery Channel. But he also sneaks in a few hours each day to work on an ongoing series of hilarious (or completely discomforting depending on your perspective) animation experiments that he shares through his Instagram account. The floppy 3D renderings of haggard old men being shot at with donuts and imposing suited figures clad in scale-like armor are all ways for Diacono to learn new animation tools like Houdini while expressing himself creatively, free of commercial constraints.

Dianco says the experiments began about 8 months ago, inspired in part by the wildly popular mo-cap dance video produced by Method Studios. “I started doing some small tests, and decided to start uploading them to Instagram as a way of forcing myself to start and finish something,” he shares with Colossal. “Otherwise, you can work on a piece forever and then forget about it when commercial work comes and you need to put it aside. These small things are manageable, they don’t take more than a couple hours to make and that’s great for me.”

While Dianco states emphatically on his Instagram profile that he’s “definitely not an artist,” he was approached in May by ArtFutura to participate in an exhibition at Ex-Dogana in Rome that’s up through September. You can follow more of his works on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Artist Lucy Sparrow Opens an Entire Convenience Store of Handmade Felt Products in Manhattan

June 21, 2017

Christopher Jobson

If you have a late-night hankering for some felty gefilte fish or a bottle of fermented fabric, be sure to stop by 8 ‘Til Late, the newest temporary installation by British artist Lucy Sparrow known for her felt recreations of everyday objects. Located in Manhattan at The Standard, High Line, the bodega is filled from floor to ceiling with thousands of objects you might find at a typical corner store from breakfast cereals, a deli counter brimming with meats, frozen foods, and spirits—all made from felt and a bit of paint. And just like a real store, every last thing is for sale.

Over the last few years Sparrow has exhibited her felt objects in galleries and art fairs around the world including Art Basel, Scope Miami, and the New York Affordable Art Fair. 8 ‘Til Late is a companion piece to her 2014 installation in London titled The Corner Shop with a similar concept but with Eurocentric products. We have word that lines stretched around the block the last few days and every object in the store has since sold. While originally scheduled to be open through June 30th, the exhibition is ending early, specifically 10pm tonight. So if you’re nearby, now’s your chance. Maybe?

You can see the finer details of some 400 individual items from 8 ‘Til Late on Sparrow’s website.

 

 



Art Craft

Superb Cut Paper Artworks by Pippa Dyrlaga

June 21, 2017

Christopher Jobson

All images © Pippa Dyrlaga.

Yorkshire-based artist and printmaker Pippa Dyrlaga has a lovely portfolio of cut paper works. Each piece is cut from a single sheet of paper and is infused with a rich pattern of repetitive cuts that form the scaly details of twisting snakes to the patterned plumage of parrots or the fur of cats. Dyrlaga has degrees in Contemporary Art Practice and Art and Design and Curation from Leeds Metropolitan University and now works on a variety of freelance and commissioned projects. She also translates many of her pieces into limited edition screen prints which she sells in her shop. (via Yatzer)

 

 



Art Illustration

Elongated Female Figures Composed From Elements of Natural and Urban Scenery by Johanna Goodman

June 21, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Taller than trees and towering over buildings, Johanna Goodman‘s pieced together female forms appear to stretch far above the landscapes before them. The collaged works, which combine elements of art, design, and architecture, are a part Goodman’s series titled The Catalogue of Imaginary Beings, which aims to explore the individual’s role in history and popular culture.

“[The Catalogue of Imaginary Beings] draws its inspiration from a wide spectrum of sources—including magical realism, surrealism and symbolism—and more specifically references such cultural artifacts as talismans, idols, totems and all of the material detritus that surrounds all of us all the time,” Goodman told Ms. “These characters are composites embodying notions of ‘the warrior,’ vulnerability, industry, the universal and the personal. They reference these identities as they’ve been depicted historically through art, literature and commerce.”

Recently Goodman has created works that commemorate the strong women involved in the Women’s March on Washington and its sister marches across the globe. She has also created work inspired by the Climate March that occurred this past April (like the figure seen erupting from a smoke stack below). You can view more of Goodman’s elongated collages on her Instagram and Tumblr. (via Tu Recepcja)

 

 



Illustration Science

A Neural Network Generates Surprisingly Elegant Images of Dinosaurs Composed of Plants

June 20, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Artist and writer Chris Rodley utilized a deep learning algorithm to create these really lovely illustrations of dinosaurs composed of plants. The images were generated with an online service called DeepArt that lets you upload a “target” image and then apply a visual style to it. For step one he fed the network images of common dinosaurs and then applied the styles of 19th-century fruit engravings and botanical illustrations. The results are a sort of 21st-century artificial intelligence channeling Giuseppe Arcimboldo. You can read a bunch more about all the technical mumbo jumbo over on Sploid. (via Kottke)