Design

Heath Ceramics Makes Iced Tea Required Drinking

October 25, 2010

Christopher Jobson

This may be the first and the last iced tea set that makes it onto Colossal, but we have a thing for ceramics so deal. (via annelinnting)

 

 



Art

Spectacles of Environments by Phoebe Washburn

October 25, 2010

Christopher Jobson

Enormous and intricate installations by New York artist Phoebe Washburn

[…] Washburn has moved on to newsprint and scrap wood, but what her massive, room-size architectural sculptures all share is that they’re built from the scavenged bits of the urban world in which she lives. She prizes the castoff and mass-produced—the pencils, crates and day-old newspapers that none of us much cares about—and then sorts, layers and transforms them into what she calls “spectacles of environments.”

Many more great photos on flickr. (via the function key)

 

 



Art Design History

Writing Without Words by Stefanie Posavec

October 25, 2010

Christopher Jobson

This image by Stefanie Posavec represents all of the sentences in On the Road by Jack Kerouac. Each line is organized according to the number of words per sentence, and the sentences are color-coded according to theme. This is only one of many killer infographics in Posavec’s Writing Without Words series in which she attempts to visually organize the language of books. Prints available. (via we find wildness)

 

 



Design

An Invisible Bike Helmet by Hövding

October 25, 2010

Christopher Jobson

The inflatable Hövding bicycle helmet designed by Anna Haupt and Terese Alstin isn’t on the market just yet, but the test footage above of repeated 20km collisions between bike and car suggests some serious money has been invested into this incredible device. The helmet works like an airbag that’s worn somewhat discretely around the neck and inflates just before impact. Awesome. (via core77)

 

 



Art Design Science

Vanessa Ruiz Curates Anatomical Art on her Blog Street Anatomy

October 24, 2010

Christopher Jobson

So, this exists. Street Anatomy, created by Vanessa Ruiz, is a wonderful blog that documents the convergence of medicine, art, and design. I’ve spent all morning scrolling through the archives and you should too.

 

 



Design History

Dazzle Camouflage Gives Warships an Unlikely Disguise

October 22, 2010

Christopher Jobson

I’ve been meaning to post this for a while ever since seeing it on Graphic Hug a while back but it kinda fell off the radar. Dazzle camouflage was a technique used during both WWI and WWII to obscure aspects war ships.

At first glance Dazzle seems unlikely camouflage, drawing attention to the ship rather than hiding it, but this technique was developed after the Allied Navies were unable to develop effective means to disguise ships in all weather.

Dazzle did not conceal the ship but made it difficult for the enemy to estimate its type, size, speed and heading. The idea was to disrupt the visual rangefinders used for naval artillery. Its purpose was confusion rather than concealment. An observer would find it difficult to know exactly whether the stern or the bow is in view; and it would be equally difficult to estimate whether the observed vessel is moving towards or away from the observer’s position.

RISD also has a super cool online gallery on the topic. Great stuff. On a related note, and from a different war, see also Quaker Guns. (via graphic hug)