Posts tagged
with abstract


Walk Inside a Warehouse-Sized Kaleidoscopic Painting by Katharina Grosse

January 19, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

The newest work by German artist Katharina Grosse encompasses an entire warehouse, transforming its raw interior into a soft maze of kaleidoscopic color. The installation, titled The Horse Trotted Another Couple of Metres, Then it Stopped, responds to the architecture of Sydney’s contemporary art center Carriageworks, filling the industrial space with nearly 90,000 square feet of painted fabric.

“I was fascinated by the thought of folding space,” explained Grosse in a statement about the work. “I was interested in taking this vast surface and shrinking it by folding or, actually, hiding the entirety of what’s there. I understand a painting as something that, as we view it, travels through us and realigns our connections with the world.”

To produce the piece Grosse first suspended the multitude of fabric from Carriageworks’ ceiling, creating a series of drapes and folds. The artist then used a spray gun to paint the work in a series of gestural strokes, creating an immersive site-specific environment that obscures the historic building’s architecture in a dense mass of swirling color.

The work was mounted as a part of Sydney Festival 2018, and is on view through April 8, 2018. You can view more of Grosse’s large-scale paintings (including this 2016 in situ installation at Rockaway Beach) on her website.  (via Juxtapoz)



Art Photography

Abstracted Street Puddles Awash in Neon by Slava Semeniuta

January 10, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Photographer and artist Slava Semeniuta, who goes by the name Local Preacher, recently noticed the glimmering reflective beauty of the streets of Sochi after an evening rain. As the artist tells Colossal, he had his camera handy and was able to “show the hidden beauty under our feet.” The series of dramatically-colored photographs isolates neon shop window reflections in puddles and potholes and transforms the captured moments into otherworldly landscapes. Semeniuta is based in Sochi, Russia, and shares his work on Behance and Instagram.




Explosive Light-Based Installations by Adela Andea

January 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Romanian-born artist Adela Andea creates futuristic light installations that range from wall-based works to immersive environments. The pieces appears as lit explosions, with LED lights, magnifying lenses, and flex neon springing outwards in a blend of chaos and control. Despite their composition of electrified material, each work is inspired by a natural phenomena. Andea looks to bioluminescent sea life, melting icebergs, and cosmological events to shape the composition and meaning of her large-scale installations.

Andea is currently represented by Anya Tish Gallery in Houston and Cris Worley Fine Arts in Dallas. You can see more of her neon-based installations on her website. (via The Jealous Curator)



Design Photography

Spaceships: Abstract Photographs of European Architecture Portrayed as Spacecraft by Lars Stieger

July 31, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Hamburg-based photographer Lars Stieger travels around Europe to photograph architectural structures, but instead of capturing a building in its entirety he opts to isolate only the most unusual aspects, recasting each as a figment of science fiction. For his new series titled Spaceships he pushes this concept to the extreme by applying an otherwordly color scheme that places these real-life buildings onto alien worlds or sends them hurtling through space. You can see more from the series on Behance.




More Than a Mile of Abstract Neon Lighting Suspended Within Tate Britain

April 4, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

All images © Tate Photography/Joe Humphreys

Suspended from the ceiling of Tate Britain's Duveen Galleries is Welsh artist Cerith Wyn Evans' latest installation, over a mile of bright neon lighting broken into abstract lines and monumental curves. The piece, Forms in Space… by Light (in Time), changes with perspective, each of the work’s three sections continuously morphing as one walks around the clusters of kinetic energy.

These abstract symbols appear as marked movements in the air, a direct intention by Wyn Evans who was greatly influenced by Japanese Noh theatre and choreology—the practice of turning dance into notational form.

Other site-specific installations by the aritst include Arr/Dep (imaginary landscape for the birds) at the Headquarters of Lufthansa in Frankfurt (2006) and E=V=E=N=T (2015), a sculpture commissioned for Malmö Live. You can visit his installation, which was produced for the Tate Britain Commission with support from Sotheby’s, until August 20, 2017. (via Dezeen)




Digital Artist Mike Winkelmann Creates Daily Conceptual Illustrations Spanning Nearly a Decade

October 21, 2016

Christopher Jobson


For over 9 years, graphic designer and digital artist Mike Winkelmann (aka Beeple) has endeavored to create a new digital illustration every single day. From abstract blobs of metallic goo to fully-realized science fiction landscapes, Winkelmann shares every creation he makes in an uninterrupated stream online via Tumblr, Facebook and elsewhere. While some pieces are more successful than others, he says the daily act of creation is less about producing consistently solid work, and more about working through ideas, quickly working through the bad ones, and learning new tools or methods. The vast majority of what he imagines simply defies explanation or genre, and themes change dramatically from image to image. Winkelmann shares more about his process and tools in this interview with iO9. (via Behance)












Geometric Watercolors by Artist Jacob Van Loon

September 14, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

Recent Colorado transplant Jacob van Loon creates geometric watercolors that seem to visually reference abstract architectural renderings. The colors in his works look as if they have bled beyond recognition of a specific site or landmark, yet still retain a strict set of dense and chaotic lines. The paintings trap specific colors in the boxes of their grid-like surface, yet also allow some to traverse throughout the work, alternating between clean and hazy sections of muted blues and bright oranges.

“By the time I have a final sketch, the layers of primer are caked up and full of valleys and ridges created by broad brush strokes,” van Loon told The Creator’s Project. “When I’m ready for color, it’s not just about pragmatically filling in the spaces, it’s about putting paint down, letting it travel in the valleys and ridges, and seeing where and how it all comes to rest.”

Last year van Loon was commissioned by the band Explosions in the Sky and Temporary Residence Ltd to create the cover art for their album The Wilderness. A video of the making of the work titled 8th and Main can be see above, and final images of the work below. Van Loon’s work will be included in the upcoming group exhibition “How High” at Left Field in San Luis Obispo, CA, and you can see more of his gridded watercolor works on his Instagram and Behance.


“8th & Main” (2015), watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel, 29″ x 29″ x 2″ Client: Explosions in the Sky/Temporary Residence Ltd.


“8th & Main” (2015), watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel, 29″ x 29″ x 2″ Client: Explosions in the Sky/Temporary Residence Ltd.


“8th & Main” (2015), watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel, 29″ x 29″ x 2″ Client: Explosions in the Sky/Temporary Residence Ltd.


“Pershing” (2014), watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel, 32″x48″


“Pershing” (2014), watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel, 32″x48″


“Haish” (2015), watercolor and graphite on wood, 22″x30″


“Haish” (2015), watercolor and graphite on wood, 22″x30″