Tag Archives: abstract

More Than a Mile of Abstract Neon Lighting Suspended Within Tate Britain 

All images © Tate Photography/Joe Humphreys

Suspended from the ceiling of Tate Britain's Duveen Galleries is Welsh artist Cerith Wyn Evans' latest installation, over a mile of bright neon lighting broken into abstract lines and monumental curves. The piece, Forms in Space… by Light (in Time), changes with perspective, each of the work’s three sections continuously morphing as one walks around the clusters of kinetic energy.

These abstract symbols appear as marked movements in the air, a direct intention by Wyn Evans who was greatly influenced by Japanese Noh theatre and choreology—the practice of turning dance into notational form.

Other site-specific installations by the aritst include Arr/Dep (imaginary landscape for the birds) at the Headquarters of Lufthansa in Frankfurt (2006) and E=V=E=N=T (2015), a sculpture commissioned for Malmö Live. You can visit his installation, which was produced for the Tate Britain Commission with support from Sotheby’s, until August 20, 2017. (via Dezeen)

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Digital Artist Mike Winkelmann Creates Daily Conceptual Illustrations Spanning Nearly a Decade 

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For over 9 years, graphic designer and digital artist Mike Winkelmann (aka Beeple) has endeavored to create a new digital illustration every single day. From abstract blobs of metallic goo to fully-realized science fiction landscapes, Winkelmann shares every creation he makes in an uninterrupated stream online via Tumblr, Facebook and elsewhere. While some pieces are more successful than others, he says the daily act of creation is less about producing consistently solid work, and more about working through ideas, quickly working through the bad ones, and learning new tools or methods. The vast majority of what he imagines simply defies explanation or genre, and themes change dramatically from image to image. Winkelmann shares more about his process and tools in this interview with iO9. (via Behance)

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Geometric Watercolors by Artist Jacob Van Loon 

Recent Colorado transplant Jacob van Loon creates geometric watercolors that seem to visually reference abstract architectural renderings. The colors in his works look as if they have bled beyond recognition of a specific site or landmark, yet still retain a strict set of dense and chaotic lines. The paintings trap specific colors in the boxes of their grid-like surface, yet also allow some to traverse throughout the work, alternating between clean and hazy sections of muted blues and bright oranges.

“By the time I have a final sketch, the layers of primer are caked up and full of valleys and ridges created by broad brush strokes,” van Loon told The Creator’s Project. “When I’m ready for color, it’s not just about pragmatically filling in the spaces, it’s about putting paint down, letting it travel in the valleys and ridges, and seeing where and how it all comes to rest.”

Last year van Loon was commissioned by the band Explosions in the Sky and Temporary Residence Ltd to create the cover art for their album The Wilderness. A video of the making of the work titled 8th and Main can be see above, and final images of the work below. Van Loon’s work will be included in the upcoming group exhibition “How High” at Left Field in San Luis Obispo, CA, and you can see more of his gridded watercolor works on his Instagram and Behance.

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“8th & Main” (2015), watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel, 29″ x 29″ x 2″ Client: Explosions in the Sky/Temporary Residence Ltd.

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“8th & Main” (2015), watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel, 29″ x 29″ x 2″ Client: Explosions in the Sky/Temporary Residence Ltd.

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“8th & Main” (2015), watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel, 29″ x 29″ x 2″ Client: Explosions in the Sky/Temporary Residence Ltd.

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“Pershing” (2014), watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel, 32″x48″

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“Pershing” (2014), watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel, 32″x48″

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“Haish” (2015), watercolor and graphite on wood, 22″x30″

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“Haish” (2015), watercolor and graphite on wood, 22″x30″

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Artist Samantha Keely Smith Explores Powerful Collisions of Dark and Light in Her Abstract Elemental Paintings 

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Yield, 54″ x 72″, oil and varnish on canvas, 2014.

When encountering paintings by artist Samantha Keely Smith (previously) it’s nearly impossible to escape the mystery and gravity depicted by a violent clash of abstract brush strokes. Ocean waves crash atop foreboding bodies of water, plumes of fire seem to battle clouds in the sky, and swirling storms shield distant secrets just over the horizon. Smith refers to her paintings as ‘internal landscapes,’ part of an ongoing examination of an externalized inner conflict. “My newer works try to boldly portray the struggle I’ve always tried to address in my work between order and chaos, dark and light, and positive and negative impulses,” Smith shares, “along with addressing what feels like a shifting and unpredictable landscape due to global warming.”

You can see a gallery of her most recent paintings on her website and follow progress in her studio via Instagram.

Update: Smith now offers limited edition prints through her website.

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Headlong, 56″ x 72″, oil and varnish on canvas, 2015.

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Crux, 50″ x 60″, oil and varnish on canvas, 2015.

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Interference, 56″ x 60″, oil and varnish on canvas, 2015.

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Manifold, 60″ x 72″, oil and varnish on canvas, 2015.

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Clearing, 56″ x 72″, oil and varnish on canvas, 2015.

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Issue, 60″ x 72″, oil and varnish on canvas, 2015.

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Pulse, 60″ x 72″, oil and varnish on canvas, 2016.

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Samantha in the studio working on Kindred, 2011. Photo by Thomas Feiner.

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Fluxos: A Mesmerizing Experimental Claymation Short by Diego Akel 

When watching this short animation by Brazilian animator Diego Akel, you get the distinct feeling he covered a table with clay, turned on some music, and just started messing around while snapping a photo every minute or so, almost like a kid in a sandbox. You wouldn’t think abstract experimentation with clay would result in anything particularly compelling, but in this instance it happens to be amazing. Titled Fluxos, Akel says the piece is “an essay about the constant flows of life, a self-portrait of its own process, an improvise [sic] on Bach, an investigation on plasticine.”

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Hypnotizing New Concentric Ceramic Vessels by Matthew Chambers 

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Usually people describe staring at a spinning pottery wheel as being somewhat hypnotizing, not staring at ceramic artworks themselves. But such is the case with these uncanny pieces by Matthew Chambers (previously) who continues to push the limits of his concentric stoneware vessels. Every visible layer in his sculptures is individually crafted on a wheel before Chambers assembles them, with a single piece containing dozens of objects. The artist experiments with color, scale, and the patterns by which each piece is internally situated to form colorful gradients or suggest motion across a sequences of sculptures.

Seen here is a collection of more recent work and you can see much more on Mouvements Mordernes and Puls Ceramics. Chambers will also have new pieces on view at the Campden Gallery in Gloucestershire starting October 10th.

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