Tag Archives: abstract

Louise Zhang’s Abstract Vials Filled With Playfully Grotesque Neon Blobs

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SLOSH SAMPLES #1 2014 flubber, pva glue, acrylic, oil paint, resin plastics, polymer balls, polymer clay, pigment, water, varnish, 100ml serum vials, all photos by docQment

Louise Zhang's Slosh Samples look like floating paintings, three-dimensional depictions of 2D abstract work. The bottles contain brightly colored fluids that separate and congeal, containing everything from polymer clay to flubber. At first one is delighted by the bubblegum colors that fill the vessels, yet after a quick inspection the grotesque nature of what lurks inside is easily revealed.

Both Zhang’s sculptures and paintings happily represent blob-like forms and revolting textures. The work seems excited to repel its audience after it has seduced them with its saturated neon hues, a palette that could be described as cute or playful. Zhang’s website compares her playful works to childhood cartoons like Spongebob Squarepants or Ren and Stimpy—television shows that invite our minds to interact with slime, slop, and snot.

Zhang is a Sydney-based artist currently working on her MFA at UNSW Art & Design and partaking in a residency with Throwdown Press. The artist’s first solo exhibition Plomp was held at Artereal Gallery in 2014. Zhang has described her work as “evocative of confectionery—the gooey, the sticky, and the sensation of sweets melting,” which brings to mind the sweet and sugary installations of Pip & Pop. (via Zannaka)

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SLOSH SAMPLES #2 2014 flubber, pva glue, acrylic, oil paint, resin plastics, polymer balls, polymer clay, pigment, water, varnish, 100ml serum vials

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SLOSH SAMPLES #2 (details) 2014

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Beautiful Abstract Bird Plumage Photographs by Thomas Lohr

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Photographer Thomas Lohr is known mostly for his high-profile fashion shoots for clients like Vogue, Le Monde d’Hermès, and i-D, but somewhere in his grueling shooting schedule he still finds time for personal projects, the most recent of which is a collection of bird plumage photos gathered into a limited edition book titled Birds. Lohr wanted to take a slightly different approach with the project and instead of capturing the animals in their entirety, he decided to focus on what intrigued him the most: the color, texture, and form of their feathers.

The abstract photos of wings, bellies, and other near unrecognizable parts of each bird are accompanied by each species scientific name like “Anodorhynchus Hyacinthinus” or “Geronticus Eremita,” creating yet another unfamiliar layer of abstraction. You can take a peek inside the book on Lohr’s website, and read an interview over on AnOther. (via AnOther, This Isn’t Happiness)

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Swirling Photographs of Mixed Paint by Mark Lovejoy

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Working from his studio in Alpine, Texas, artist Mark Lovejoy creates richly textured images of mixed paint, but although he’s somewhat secretive about his process, one thing is clear: they aren’t just photographs of mixed paint. The act of creating the color formations alone sounds more like an act of chemistry than art as he mixes resins, oils, diluents, waxes, and drying agents to create the gloppy textures you see here. Portions are then photographed, reworked, and reshot. In the end, we’re left staring at beautifully colorful images that exist somewhere between salt water taffy, Jackson Pollock paintings, and an alluring industrial accident. Whatever they are, Lovejoy is extremely proficient, cranking out several images each day which he shares on his website. Prints are available of every image. (via It’s Nice That)

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Psychedelic Paint and Poured Resin Artworks by Bruce Riley

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Chicago-based artist Bruce Riley fills canvases with abstract organic forms made from layer after layer of dripped paint and poured resin. While looking at images of his work online, it’s difficult to grasp the depth and scale of each piece which can be penetrated by light from multiple angles, casting shadows deep into the artwork. Riley works using a number of experimental techniques, frequently incorporating mistakes and unexpected occurrences into the thick paintings that appear almost sculptural in nature. Filmmakers Jason Stanfield and Jordan Olshansky recently stopped by Riley’s studio and shot this brief studio visit. You can see more of his paintings on Flickr, and at Packer Schopf Gallery. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Concentrically Layered Ceramic Sculptures and Vessels by Matthew Chambers

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When stopping to consider these masterful ceramic objects by artist by Matthew Chambers, a flood of familiar images came to mind as I tried to understand what I was looking at. The aperture of a camera, the protective shell of a curled up armadillo, ocean waves, bowls of pasta, or portals to other dimensions; all valid reactions to these hand-built ceramic vessels and sculptures that contain dozens of thin concentric layers.

For the last 8 years Chambers has been working from a 215 square foot studio in Newport on the Isle of Wight where he creates each piece without the aid of sketches or designs, preferring to experiment as he works. Each “layer” is an individual section thrown on a potter’s wheel which he then assembles with other layers to make a solid sculpture. How something so precisely geometric can be formed from clay by hand is nothing short of astounding.

Chambers most recently had work at New Craftsman Gallery. You can also read a studio visit from Ceramic Arts Daily, and a more in-depth interview about his process on Ideas in the Making. (via Rhubarbes, Contemporist)

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Regular Division: A Hypnotic Video Collage Merging Classical Oil Painting and Greenhouses

You can safely file this video titled Regular Division from artist Joe Hamilton under I don’t know what it is but I like it. One way to explain it would be a collaged cinematic journey through ornate botanical gardens … augmented with famous oil paintings. Or something? Intrigued, I reached out to Hamilton and he shares a bit via email:

Regular Division is a collaged video loop that was shot and digitally composed on location in Europe, Asia and the Middle East as part of a new series of works looking at landscape. The series responds to the impact of the digital technologies on our representation of landscape and the effect of this on our relationship with landscape.

Regular Division, the first in this series of works, features a spiral of intermingled scenes filmed from inside a number of green houses and domes. An artificial paradise of foliage under a canopy of gridded glass. The video also features high resolution images of brush strokes taken from classical oil paintings bridging a connection to the traditional medium that has played such an important role in the representation of landscape in the past.

The piece is currently on view at Pablo’s Birthday Gallery in New York as part of the group show ‘Like New Landscape’ curated by Front Company. (via Booooooom)

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Abstract Parisian Rooftops Photographed by Michael Wolf

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For a photographer living in a major city filled with iconic architecture, museums, and myriad tourist destinations, the struggle to capture an authentic image is great. This was the exact situation photographer Michael Wolf found himself in after moving to Paris from Hong Kong in 2008. Surrounded in a city filled with sights that could easily be interpreted as cliché, Wolf pointed his camera away from the recognizable landmarks and instead focused on the dense rooftops surrounding the city. Packed with stout chimneys, tv antennas, graffiti, and numerous geometric forms, these shots present a strange abstracted view of a usually recognizable place.

Wolf’s “Paris Abstract” series is currently on view at Robert Koch Gallery in San Francisco through September 6, 2014. (via Juxtapoz)

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